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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration System
There have been some interesting things going on in the browser battlefield regarding color managing, as seen in these two blog posts:

Safari brings color-managed browsing to Windows
Color Spaces

The web, as it currently stands, is basically an unmanaged environment. But that might change with Safari for Windows and future versions of Firefox. Calibrating your monitor will be more and more important if this turns out to be true. So I thought I might share something that I've learned from calibrating current large LCDs.

Eyeballs are no replacement for hardware calibration, but they are free and readily available, as is Apple's ColorSync Display Calibrator. The problem is that monitors have come a long way in recent years, but Apple's software is essentially a port from OS 8 and haven't changed much since. The Apple logo and grey background were fine for 800x600 and 1024x768 days, but look pretty small on 1920x1200.

If you change the resolution to 640x480 before calibrating, you get two advantages: One, the Display Calibrator takes the entire screen; two, the image gets blurry and you don't have to squint as much in order to blend the Apple logo with the background. I found that changing the resolution led to a much better result. Just remember to choose Hide Others from the Apple menu before changing the resolution, or else you'll end up with lots of tiny windows everywhere when you get back to your native resolution.
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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: kkL on Jun 26, '07 10:58:22AM

Isn't scaling causing color blending, which in turn spoils optical effect on which calibration is based on?

(instead of white/black/white/black stripes you get white/gray/gray/black/gray/gray, etc. so it'll be less different from solid gray than the same graphic in 1:1 to screen pixels)



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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: Unsoluble on Jun 26, '07 06:51:17PM

Changing resolution doesn't cause that sort of antialiasing, because it isn't actually doing any scaling -- it's just making all the pixels bigger. You'd get the effect you're describing if you used the mousewheel-zoom thing via Universal Access.



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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: robogobo on Jun 26, '07 02:26:51PM

Great idea! I think Apple's software is adequate for most needs, unless you're outputting to print. Even then, it's a good start, and free.



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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: jef_pearlman on Jun 26, '07 10:02:40PM

Don't most LCD screens (which pretty much all laptops and a large fraction of recent desktops) do antialiased scaling when operating at below-native resolution? So it seems like you would get the blurring problem (though whether that would mess up the illusion, I don't know)...



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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: Unsoluble on Jun 26, '07 10:30:59PM

Ahh yes, LCD screens would indeed do that at non-native resolutions. I'm pretty sure it wouldn't actually noticeably affect the calibration process, though.



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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: Pedro Estarque on Jun 27, '07 06:48:18AM

The blurring is a welcome side effect from the resolution decrease. It doesn't require you to squint as much in order to blend foreground to background.



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Reduce monitor resolution to ease calibration
Authored by: tommyw on Jun 28, '07 02:05:30AM
I'm sure many viewers will know this. It's not free...but you can try it out fully before you buy. It's very good and much more thorough than Apple's one:

http://www.bergdesign.com/supercal/




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