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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status System
Put this in the "almost useless, but interesting feature" category. I recently realized that when working on a new document in most OS X applications (Text Edit, Word, and many others), the icon in the title bar of the document is slightly grayed-out until you save the document. As soon as you edit it more, it goes gray again. Additionally, if you use the Undo feature enough to get your document to match the saved version, the icon will brighten again. If you go past your last save using Undo, you can Redo until the icon brightens again.

I can't imagine a really good use for this feature except that you can quickly tell if you've saved a document since your last edit.

[robg adds: I must admit, I'd never paid much attention to the icon in the title bar, so I hadn't noticed this behavior. I usually just glance at the red "Close" button, looking for the black dot in its center, which is another way OS X lets you know a document has unsaved changes.]
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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: aGr[j5(6WU on Feb 16, '07 07:55:55AM

The reason it "greys out" is because the Title Bar icon actually acts as a draggable link to the document it heads. For example, dragging it to the Desktop creates an alias; holding Command, Option or Ctrl at the same time copies the file. Thus, the "greying out" is to prevent the copying of a document that has unsaved changes.



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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: Snaro on Feb 16, '07 07:58:58AM

This so called "proxy" icon is greyed out to prevent you from accidentally moving an unsaved document. I assume you know that you can use the proxy like any other icon on the desktop, i.e. you can drag it to another folder, drop it onto an open iChat connection or into an open Terminal window to get the document's path.



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At least since OS 9!
Authored by: Lou Kash on Feb 16, '07 10:52:55AM

Title bar proxy icons have been here at least since OS 9, possibly even since OS 8 (I don't remember, I went from OS 7 directly to OS 9). So this is no big news at all. The behaviour was the same.

Not all apps used to support it though. But e.g. Photoshop, InDesign, Illustrator or Word did.



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At least since OS 9!
Authored by: StarvArt on Feb 17, '07 09:49:26AM

Here, too...I've been using that visual cue for a long time!

It never ceases to amaze me how many of these little things I've always taken for granted that everyone else already knew about and/or was using, and never took the time to drill through the archives here to find out if it's already been 'hinted'.



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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: osxpounder on Feb 16, '07 12:15:02PM

Like Rob, I usually glance at the little red window-closing widget in the top left corner of OSX windows, because a "black dot" can be seen there for any unsaved file [at least, that's how it should be on OSX]. You even see the black dot if the app is in the background [not in focus].

Some apps that are cross platform do something similar, instead [or in addition to the black dot]: they add a space and an asterisk [*] to the name in the title bar when a file has unsaved changes. That's also good, because you can see that even when the app's in the background, and it works for apps that have tabbed windows or something similar that would prevent the window's red widget from showing the status of multiple files.



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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: qwerty denzel on Feb 16, '07 01:23:50PM

In the list of windows in an App's 'Window' menu, all documents which are unsaved have a bullet beside their name. Minimized windows gain a diamond, and the currently active document, of course, gets a tick.



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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: osxpounder on Feb 22, '07 12:34:05PM

For some, the "tick" is also known as a "check mark".



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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: qwerty denzel on Feb 16, '07 01:36:34PM
Also, Xcode, which is the only Apple app I can think of that has something like tabs for navigating editable documents, darkens the icon of any unsaved file in its 'Groups & Files' list.

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Use the title bar's document icon to check saved status
Authored by: Satinder S Sidhu on Feb 17, '07 08:09:48AM

I find this proxy icon very helpful in locating where I have saved the file when I carelessly complete the "Save" action before navigating to the folder where I had intended it to go. The full path that is revealed when I command-click on this icon lets me open the enclosing folder from where the file can be moved to its proper place.



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Use the title bar's document icon to save file, etc.
Authored by: joe40 on Feb 18, '07 11:42:30AM

You can drag the document's title bar icon to save the file elseware by dragging it almost wherever you want.
Or drag it to MAIL icon in the dock to compose a new email with that document as an attachment. When dragging to a folder, hold down the option key while dragging to make a copy instead of making an alias.



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Use the title bar's document icon to save file, etc.
Authored by: osxpounder on Feb 22, '07 12:44:16PM

In my experience, dragging the proxy icon to a folder copies the file to that location, rather than moving it -- or at least, it does that sometimes, and maybe it happens often to me because I use so many drives and mounted disk images.

So, to help ensure that the file goes where I want it, and only there, I just got into the habit of using the standard modifier keys every time I drag a proxy icon:

1. Unless I want to copy or make an alias, I hold down CMD before dropping a file. That ensures the file is moved, not copied or aliased. Since it's a habit, I don't have to waste time checking where the file was, or is. I started doing this because I made aliases too often when I meant to move or copy the file.

2. If I want a copy, I hold down Option before dropping, even if I happen to be dragging to some place that already triggers a copy. Again, it's about me knowing what happens without having to check. The Option-drop always copies.

3. If I want an alias, I hold down CMD and Option before dropping.

In other words, I prefer to ignore the fact that Apple's OSes assume "copy" in some cases, "move" in others, because ultimately I found that this helpful feature, though perfectly logical, wasn't helping me, it was hurting me. For me, it's better to assume I must always choose move, copy or alias, since it's just an added key or two.



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