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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance Apps
Adobe's new Reader 8.0 is very fast; a noticeable improvement over version 7 (especially if you disable most of the plug-ins within the package). However, Reader 8's "self-heal" feature will automatically install the Adobe Help Viewer 1.0 in your Applications folder whenever Reader is launched. I don't want it in this location, because I reserve my root applications directory for audio apps only (with all others in an OS X Apps sub-folder).

I couldn't figure out how to change the default path, but found that simply making the app invisible (with Mac Pilot) would eliminate the annoyance. Admittedly trivial, as most annoyances are, but it's also nice to find a solution.

[robg adds: There are many ways of making apps invisible, of course, including many free options (SetFile in Terminal if you have the Developer Tools installed, for instance). If you haven't tried Reader 8 yet, it's worth the download time, although I'm holding out hope for a Firefox and/or Camino PDF plug-in.]
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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: megasad on Dec 11, '06 08:05:20AM
Search inside of both "/Library/Application Support/Adobe/Acrobat/RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml" and "/Applications/Adobe Reader.app/Contents/MacOS/RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml" for all instances of ">/Applications/" and then replace that with ">Contents/MacOS/SelfHealFiles/Applications/". If you do that, the foolish help and updater files are not created outside of the Adobe Reader application itself everytime you run it.

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http://www.megasad.com/

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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: erostratus on Dec 11, '06 03:00:21PM

Sorry to ask this, but for those of us who don't know, how do you disable the plug-ins in Reader 8? I'll take all the extra speed I can get!



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 11, '06 03:24:22PM

Get info on the app, and there is a Plugins pane on the Get Info window, with check boxes next to each plugin.

Just uncheck the ones you want disabled.

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: audioaquatic on Dec 12, '06 01:43:19PM

Hi - I can't get this edit to work: could you elaborate on the Find/Replace paths? Thanks, Jim



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: Echidna on Mar 08, '07 09:50:19PM

Holy crap, that's great. This comment should be the hint! I hate applications that think they're smarter than you are. Way to out-smart it!

audioaquatic: If you're still paying attention to this thread, open the two files mentioned above (right click on Acrobat Reader.app and choose "Show package contents" to navigate inside it) in TextEdit (or some other editor) and do a find and replace.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: charlietuna on Dec 11, '06 08:23:46AM

I remember how in OS 9 and under, we moved around Applications with impunity. I can't understand why we'd repeatedly confront this issue now in OS X, 5 or more years later. Apple updaters will break. Other applications' updaters will break. This hint is not so much a hint as a user-error fix.

If you want to keep your applications together, give them the same label and group them with a smart folder you attach to your dock or Finder sidebar. Or just use old fashioned aliases in a regular old folder. Now there's a real hint.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 11, '06 09:02:26AM

Exactly. There's no reason at all to move applications around and put them in folders. The reason I say this is if you have to go into your applications folder to launch an application in the first place, you aren't working as efficiently as you can.

Moving applications in OS X is not a good idea in general.

There are any number of ways to organize groups of aliases... folders in your dock, or things like third party apps like DragThing, and FruitMenu (two of my favorites).

I also use my Mac for audio, and my most used apps (Cubase SX, Spark XL) are planted firmly in my Dock (along with Photoshop, Illustrator, etc.)

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: mistersquid on Dec 11, '06 09:49:09AM

Well here's a couple of self-important prescriptions for telling people how to work.

Thanks so much!



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 11, '06 01:00:19PM

And that was a self-important bit of judging?

More self-importance comes from Apple who advise not to move applications from their default locations or put them in folders.

We gave our opinions and advice... you read too often people complaining when a recent system upgrade doesn't work and leaves half updated folders masquerading as applications in the Applications folder due to things being moved.

Since this was posted as a "hint", which is defined as "a small piece of practical information or advice" we followed up with more practical information and advice, which in my case of using Macs since 1990, I think is well worth heeding.

And what useful bit of information did you contribute to this discussion? ;)

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: Peganthyrus on Dec 11, '06 09:40:16PM
And yet we have this handy "go->applications' shortcut in the Finder, with the easy-to-remember apple-shift-A shortcut. Got that application you use once every quarter, can't remember its name, don't want it cluttering up your dock? Apple-shift-a and dig around. Except Applications is a mess. So we make folders in it.

Yeah, I know, this is the age of tagging and smart search and we're not supposed to ever care about the file structure on our disk any more. Sometimes folders work for a memorable scheme.

Some stuff works in a folder off of Applications, some doesn't. I've gotten used to Adobe's apps not being able to launch their own help since CS2, for instance, since I keep them and their annoying standalone help application in a 'gfx' directory of my applications along with my other graphics tools...

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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: palsyboy on Dec 11, '06 10:52:01PM

It's a lot easier and more elegant to use a combination of Quicksilver and HimmelBar.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: Peganthyrus on Dec 12, '06 09:55:13PM

Actually, I mostly launch stuff with QS and the Dock. Popping open a reasonably-organized Applications folder is for those now and then apps that don't get permanent space in either the Dock or in my brain...



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 12, '06 03:16:02PM

That's fine, but you still have to dig through folders. I hate digging through folders. I rarely open the Applications folder, being that it is such a mess, if I don't have to. I don't even open my hard drive very often.

The Go menu is a lame excuse for the fact that Apple decided that the Apple menu was out dated.. but it was a good place to put aliases. I do use the keyboard shortcuts, but the rest of the Go menu is somewhat redundant, as you have these folders in your sidebar. I use Fruitmenu, and many of my often, and not so often used apps are lunched from there.

I think the OS X Finder is poorly designed in general. I dislike the column view as it's implemented in OS X (Greg's Browser was better) and I REALLY dislike the column view in file dialog boxes, since there's too many columns, you have to resize them to see long names (without hovering over each file), and it takes you too far back in the file path. Once you open a new window you have to start all over again! GRRR! Then of course you can't sort the column by date modified, etc. I use list view almost exclusively, unless I need previews.

If you can get away with applications being in sub folders, that's great. I certainly did that in OS 7 through 9. What I do now is use Dragthing for groups of apps (Music, Graphics, Web Design, Utilities, etc.). I can get to them from any application... My DragThing palette hides, except for its tabs, when I don't need it, and pops up from the right hand side when I hover my house there... no need to switch to the Finder, open a new window and start digging... LaunchBar is another goodie for some things. PITA for others. I know Apple thinks SpotLight is a launcher... Good for finding files though.

You can easily do this by making a folder and filling it with aliases, which can then be put anywhere.. desktop, Dock, or even in your Documents folder, and then drag it to the tool bar on a Finder window, or the Sidebar.

These are my ways of doing things, and I'm not trying to get others to do it my way (my wife for instance...she has her own way, as backwards as it might seem to me, it suits her) :) But some people might find other ways of working helpful. Like learning keyboard shortcuts. (especially Command-delete.. sure beats dragging things to the trash!)

The point being that there are many ways around OS X's limitations that don't inhibit the operation of applications.

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: chucky23 on Dec 13, '06 09:18:02AM

"Moving applications in OS X is not a good idea in general."

What a maroon.

Only a VERY few badly programmed apps and updaters have problems with putting apps wherever you desire. Users with a tad bit more brain power are free to put apps wherever they please.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 13, '06 10:05:30AM
Only a VERY few badly programmed apps and updaters have problems with putting apps wherever you desire.

Like all the Apple stuff? If you look into it, it's quite a list, and not only Apple apps. If anything, the programmers are following Apple's guidelines.

Do you know the definition of asinine?

I agree it shouldn't be that way, but it is. So the advise stands on its own merits.

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net

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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 13, '06 10:15:05AM
What a maroon.

Oh I forgot... that's not actually a word, as used in the Bugs Bunny sense.

So either you are speaking of a color, or you are stranded somewhere...

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net

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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: audioaquatic on Dec 12, '06 02:38:55PM

I think it's safe to say that, notwithstanding the lack of global view settings, OSX encourages (coerces?) the user to work from a single window as much as possible. In setting up a dedicated, exceedingly complicated audio box, with elaborate installs that place files all over the place, I have good reasons for separating my audio apps from the rest of the garbage I rarely use, at least in the short term (even if I do have to manually return items to their default locations for updates). For me, all non-audio apps are merely "helper apps." When I click on the Finder icon in the dock I get a new window in column view, opened to my directory of audio apps, which is all I want to see, thank you. I admit that this is unrepentant OS 9 behavior ; but, similarly, I know EXACTLY what is and where is every item in the folder (as well as the items I have moved). I guess I do it just to wrap my head around what the hell I'm doing - the visual organization helps to do this, it seems.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 13, '06 10:34:39AM
I think it's safe to say that, notwithstanding the lack of global view settings, OSX encourages (coerces?) the user to work from a single window as much as possible.

How so? I often have many windows open. And the fact that you can bring windows from disparate applications, including the Finder, to the front simultaneously, makes things even easier. You can have your Word document right next to your Photoshop document if you want.

I commonly have 8 applications open, and have to work between them. You are making OS X sound like its using Windows' parent/child paradigm, which it is not.

Also, how do you figure there is no global view setting? When I open a new Finder window, it's just as I have set it. Windows will retain their view setting if you change it... I have certain windows open in icon view, with previews, and maximum icon size, wile others are in list view, sorted by date modified.

My default is list view sorted by name.

And as far as using OS X for audio.... I haven't found any problem having Cubase SX, Spark XL, Entourage, and Safari (and probably a few more) open at the same time.... Why on Earth would you need to limit the applications installed on your Mac? This is not a PC where you have to remove crap from the hard drive to get it to run well.

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net

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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: audioaquatic on Dec 13, '06 01:09:18PM

Apple designed the OSX Finder quite deliberately to incorporate the sidebar and customizable toolbar in order to make navigation within a single finder window as easy as possible. (The reason for this, according to some insider accounts, was that was how Steve Jobs wanted it. Very little, if any, end-user testing was involved). This has absolutely nothing to do with the windows of open applications or with running apps simultaneously. (?) As for the oft-lamented lack of global view settings, this has been addressed in a multitude of Mac GUI discussions on the web, notably those at Macintouch, with much speculation as to wether it is due to bugs or by poor design.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 14, '06 08:15:29AM

I'm not disagreeing with you, and I personally think the Finder is poorly designed, and needed a lot more end user testing. It's slow and buggy as well.

The NeXTites have taken over the shop, and many years of high quality UI convictions have gone out the window! We know Steve has things the way he is used to working. Until OS X was out he was using an IBM Thinkpad running OPEN STEP as his personal computer. He even used that to do the MacWorld keynotes (which is why he had Apple write Keynote...)

Personally I always I liked NeXTSTEP. I think they tried too hard to make the OS X Finder a compromise between the two OS's.

My point about multiple Finder windows is you sometimes need to do this just to move files around quickly. I keep all my audio files on a second hard drive, and that's organized with folder for each project, etc.

At my job I also have to have multiple Finder windows open for much the same reason.

One odd thing about OS X's Finder is being able to have the same folder open in multiple windows. That can't be good from a UI point of view, and I know many Windows to Mac switches (who admittedly are not computer savvy) that get quickly mixed up and lost. I don't think it was possible to get lost in OS 9!

One add-on I like a lot is DefaultFolder (having replaced ACTION Files on OS 9). Besides being able to navigate to all open Finder windows with a mouse gesture, you can assign default locations for various applications. I feel lost on a Mac without the various third party utilities I use. What does that tell you about the OS X Finder? It's sad really.

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G4/Digital Audio/1GHz, 1 GB, Mac OS X 10.4.8 • www.david-schwab.com • www.myspace/davidschwab • www.imanicoppola.net



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: kyngchaos on Dec 11, '06 09:51:43AM

Er, if it's invisible, it's still there. Or are you just concerned with not *seeing* it there?

Somewhat related to the comments about moving apps around, or not installing them at all (ie the selfheal patch): if you ever did need help for Reader, you wouldn't get it. Reader needs it exactly where it puts it (bad programming, really), so if it's moved someplace else it won't find it.

If you really don't want Adobe's help viewer, but want the option of Help in Reader, another way would be to do the selfheal patch, then in a Terminal (you may need to prefix this with sudo):

ln -sfh "/System/Library/CoreServices/Help Viewer.app" "/Applications/Adobe Help Viewer 1.0.app"

This will view Reader help in Apple's help viewer.



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: rakader on Jan 10, '07 08:24:23AM

Hi,

could you please explain this a little bit more. I've tried this in terminal, but without positive result.

Thanks
rakader



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: megasad on Dec 12, '06 07:39:41PM
For audioaquatic, who asked for elaboration:

In the Finder, go to the Library folder at the root of your hard drive, go to the Application Support folder within that and then the Adobe folder within that and then, finally, the Acrobat folder within that.

Open the file named RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml in a text editor such as TextEdit. Press Command-F and then copy and paste the following into the Find: field:

>/Applications/

And then the following into the Replace with: field:

>Contents/MacOS/SelfHealFiles/Applications/

Make sure the pulldown menu has Contains selected and then click on the Replace All button. The message 22 replaced should appear in grey text on the far left of the Find window.

Close the Find window and then save and close the RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml file.

Finally, you need to repeat those instructions (from the paragraph that begins "Open the file named..."), for a file with the same name (RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml) but in a different location.

To get to that different location, in the Finder, go to the Applications folder, or wherever you have currently stored the Adobe Reader application. Control-Click said application and choose Show Package Contents from the contextual menu. This will open a new window. Next, enter the Contents folder inside of said new window and once inside of that, open the MacOS folder. Here you will find the second RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml file on which to perform the above instructions.

If you haven't already, you can now delete the Adobe Utilities folder that was created within your Utilities folder (or at least the Adobe Updater5 sub-folder if you need the Adobe Utilities folder for another Adobe product) and also the more obvious Adobe Help Viewer 1.0 application from the Applications folder itself.

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http://megasad.com/

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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: rakader on Jan 10, '07 08:27:40AM

Hi,

I've tried this in Acrobat 8. There were 32 results. After doing this Acrobat doesn't start and I need a reinstall. Do you have any hint?

Thanks
rakader



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Work around an Adobe 8 Reader self-healing annoyance
Authored by: BryanD on Feb 07, '08 06:53:37PM
Even simpler:

Find the "RdrENU80SelfHeal.xml" file in both:

- Adobe Reader.app/Contents/Mac OS/
and
- /Library/Application Support/Adobe/Acrobat/

In both the above files, using a text-file editor (e.g., TextEdit, TextWrangler, etc.) find the entry containing "Adobe Updater.app" and edit it to read:
<key>required</key>
<string>NO</string>

(i.e., change the "required" key's argument from "YES" to "NO")

You can then delete the "Adobe Updater.app" from
/Applications/Utilities.

With Adobe Reader 8.1.2, that "did it" for me (on multiple systems).

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