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Swap out some laptops' batteries via hibernation mode Laptop Macs
This maybe well known and well used already, but not to me, so I suspect to others also. There have been some hints here on putting your Mac into Safe Sleep mode. But this hint is about using Safe Sleep (and its hibernation mode) to swap out the battery in your laptop.

I recently bought a second battery for my PowerBook, and kept running into the situation of having to swap out, but without having a power source to plug into. I did not trust the idea of the supposed five-minute residue, wherein things were supposed to stay in the Mac when you power down for a battery swap. And more importantly, I did not want to shut down all my work.

So I realised if I ran my Safe Sleep toggle script to enter hibernation mode directly, I could then put the Mac to sleep and swap out the battery. After power up, I'd be exactly where I left off, with all my windows and work as they were at the start. The script is here is an old one I wrote a while back, but there are others (some in the referenced hints above) that also get the job done.

[robg adds: This is probably obvious to most, but now it's documented here. Also, you do not have to enter full hibernation mode to swap out batteries. I actually wrote about this for Macworld a while back, and created a video (embedded Flash version in the above link, or watch it in QuickTime) showing that you can remove the battery even while the machine is in normal sleep mode. That's because Safe Sleep writes the contents of RAM to the hard drive when you enter normal sleep mode; once the indicator light starts its normal "blink-blink I'm sleeping" activity, you can safely remove all power sources. I've demonstrated this several times in public, and never had an issue with it.]
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Swap out some laptops' batteries via hibernation mode | 17 comments | Create New Account
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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: marook on Dec 06, '06 09:27:00AM

On MacBook Pro's (and maybe MacBooks) you can also swap the battery while the system is active, as long as the power adaptor is connected. That was not possible on PowerBooks & iBooks.

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/Marook



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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: pkrug on Dec 06, '06 10:18:21AM

Um. No. You can pull a Powerbook's battery anytime you want when it is connected to the power cord. I swap batteries this way once a week.



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Anyway to default to safe sleep?
Authored by: sr105 on Dec 06, '06 11:20:39AM

Both of my powerbook batteries are nearly dead now (~15-40 minutes of life). If I close the lid on my fully charged powerbook on a Friday afternoon and go away on vacation for 3+ days, the laptop (having been on battery power only in sleep mode) will be powered off when I return. I hit the power button and it does a normal cold boot.

Anyone know of a solution for this?



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Anyway to default to safe sleep?
Authored by: splatkus on Dec 06, '06 11:41:31AM

The best thing to do in your case would be to either leave the laptop connected to power or simply do a full shut down on it before you leave for an extended period of time.



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Anyway to default to safe sleep?
Authored by: mark hunte on Dec 06, '06 12:18:03PM

set it to hibernation mode. That way when the Battery goes flat while you're away,
it should boot back up how you left it when you plug in the power

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mh



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Anyway to default to safe sleep?
Authored by: mark hunte on Dec 06, '06 12:19:47PM

Forgot to add, thats what the script above does.

---
mh



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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: tripleman on Dec 06, '06 03:47:47PM

I swap batteries all the time on my macbook pro without powering down - just closing the lid - and I've never had a problem with it.



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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: Anonymous on Dec 06, '06 03:57:01PM

This is a bad hint because it makes wrong assumptions and spreads bad information about how safe sleep works. As long as you don't mess around with those unnecessary safe sleep scripts, a capable computer will automatically use safe sleep. When the computer goes to sleep, it writes the RAM contents to the hard drive but goes to normal sleep. During this time, you can swap out the batteries. While you are doing this, if the computer powers off, it's okay. When you put then new battery in, it will resume from the saved RAM contents on the hard drive.

The quality of hints on this website have been going downhill lately...



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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: rspeed on Dec 07, '06 02:01:46AM

It's absolutely ridiculous not to trust the backup battery. It may be small, but it doesn't take much power to keep a sleeping mac alive.

This is a decent hint for iBook owners, though.



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@ Derivatize: WTF?
Authored by: luomat on Dec 07, '06 08:19:53AM

Derivatize: You say this is a bad hint because it spreads misinformation, and then you reiterate exactly what the hint and robg's comments are about it.

What were you trying to say and how were you trying to defend your accusations by validating what had already been said?

The quality of hints on this website have been going downhill lately...

Funny I was thinking the same thing about the comments.

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@ Derivatize: WTF?
Authored by: Anonymous on Dec 07, '06 08:47:49AM
You understand safe sleep, and robg understands safe sleep, and many of the comment posters here understand safe sleep, but mark_hunte seems to not understand. At least from the wording of his comment, he implies that by not "trusting" the backup battery, he would have to restart if his laptop lost power unless he enters safe sleep directly. But this is not necessary. It is still disappointing to read wrong hints like this being published on big time websites even though robg corrects the misconception at the end.

It's a good thing we have the comments to set people straight. Really, stuff like insinuation of bugs in QuickTime, improper use of ColorSync profiles, and putting tape on all of your CDs? WTF indeed.

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safe sleep do active EVERYTIME you close the lid come on!
Authored by: lokon1979 on Dec 07, '06 09:08:45AM
any new powerbook, macbook and macbook pro that support safe sleep right from the factory, do enter safe sleep EVERY TIME when you close the lid! i can't believe that there are still so many people mix up about that!

please just read the apple support page:
http://search.info.apple.com/?search=Go&lr=lang_en&kword=&type=&newstype=&q=safe%20sleep

some scripts can toggle the safe sleep (or call it hibernate if you insist) just let you put the computer into safe sleep WITHOUT closing the lid, but no matter you close the lid or use scripts to put the computer to sleep, it give you same result - safe sleep. you can then remove the battery, next time it power up, the system will restore to the state before sleep.

and there are some method to active safe sleep on some older powerbook, so that they will do safe sleep EVERYTIME you close the lid.

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safe sleep do active EVERYTIME you close the lid come on!
Authored by: mark hunte on Dec 12, '06 11:52:52AM
I agree with Derivatize, I did not understand safe sleep, I think for the same
reason Derivatize has a problem with this hint. Reading misinfo.

When I first heard of 'hibernate' It was in the form of I had to switch it on. Using command line.
My mac is a G4 PPC 1.5ghz. 'hibernate' was new thing as far as I remember well after I got my PB.
I did not apply 'On by default' to my Mac, because I am sure in the past my battery has run down and the Mac had to be fully booted up. Hence the hint.

This seems to have changed without me realising that my Mac now seems to have 'hibernate' /safe sleep on by default.

I can also understand Derivatize frustration in some of the hints that get posted, I myself have complained in the past.
And to my horror I have contributed a bad hint.

But I do believe that one point of the comments is to have the people who read the hints is to help in verifying and expanding upon them.

As to trusting the backup Battery, its a moot point, but I still would not want to trust it. Maybe someone should really explain Why I should.
Are there any pros and cons of using the Backup Battery like this.

---
mh

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not every powerbook support safe sleep
Authored by: lokon1979 on Dec 07, '06 09:11:22AM

not every powerbook support safe sleep, and i think it's the case of yours



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not every powerbook support safe sleep
Authored by: lokon1979 on Dec 07, '06 09:13:34AM

sorry i intended to reply to sr105's "Anyway to default to safe sleep?" but made a mistake



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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: themacthinker on Dec 10, '06 12:25:13PM
Even without using this feature, I noticed that if it is just a matter of a few seconds you should be able to swap your battery without any issue. www.mostofmymac.com

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Swap out some laptop's batteries via hibernation mode
Authored by: Anonymous on Dec 13, '06 09:01:45AM

Now I'm going to tell you something that will really flip your lid! When engaged in SafeSleep, if the battery and AC is removed and the backup battery drains, the computer's NVRAM will reset, and it will "forget" that it's in SafeSleep mode and just reboot (instead of restoring), with the clock reset to 1904.

Based on my experiments, this means:

1) When swapping drained batteries, don't take longer than, say, an hour to do it. Okay, kind of obvious.
2) If your battery is drained, and no alternative is available, (another battery or AC), just leave the drained battery in the computer, don't remove it. The drained battery, though too low to run the computer, does provide enough power to keep the NVRAM. This is pretty obvious too.
3) If your battery has been drained for several hours, your backup battery might be low too; in this case, it's safer to plug into AC before removing the drained battery, "overlapping" power sources. Ah hah, not so obvious! This happened to me once and caught me by surprise. I removed my drained battery that had put the computer to sleep about four hours prior, and when I put in the new battery, it just rebooted, indicating that the backup battery was drained too. I repeated the experiment, draining the battery, waiting, and then overlapping to AC power, and it woke from SafeSleep fine.

Rather complicated, huh? I guess that's what we get for wanted to understand every detail about this automatic feature. Okay, all this is getting a bit obsessive on my part. I just really like to espouse the benefits of sleep, because I see so many people not using it on their laptops. Rebooting is so 20th century! ;)



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