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The many methods of opening a file System
Opening files by double-clicking is classic. So, is control-clicking and choosing 'Open With...' But there are other ways to open files:
  • Drag files onto application icons -- even if they're in the dock. This spares that few seconds of pause when choosing 'Open With...' from above.
  • Mac users often use the File -> Open dialog box as a method to open files. You can drag a file directly into this dialog box from the Finder, and the Open dialog box will automatically snap to the file's location, and highlight the file to be opened.
  • Advanced users can also drag the proxy icons, often found in the top of an open file's window -- left of the filename -- into an Open dialog box or application icon as described above.
  • You can drag-and-drop to applications in the Sidebar or the Toolbar.
  • Finally, the keyboard shortcut to open a file is Command-Down Arrow.
[robg adds: I believe we've published many of these in various spots over the years, but thought it might be nice to have them all collected in one hint. Anything missing from the list?]
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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: nutpoks on Jul 20, '06 07:56:11AM
open [filename] from the Terminal

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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: pub3abn on Jul 20, '06 03:42:54PM

Yeah, dude. The Terminal supports drag-and-drop, so you can type "open" followed by a space, and then drag a file over the terminal window to add its path to the line, and then just hit Enter.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: tirerim on Jul 28, '06 12:50:22AM
And, of course, open -a /path/to/application [filename] to open it with a specific application.

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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: apolet on Jul 20, '06 08:00:50AM

How about the good old Command-O ?

---
apO - PM G5 2 x 2.5 - Final Cut Studio



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: cupbeempty on Jul 20, '06 08:04:13AM

that and my personal clutter reducing method for opening apps
"cmd-opt-O" (closes parent window)



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: Gigacorpse on Jul 20, '06 09:18:22AM

I agree, and it is probably one of the best features of the Finder. When I use XP, I really miss it.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: fds on Jul 20, '06 08:44:39AM

Also don't forget that when dragging a file on a Dock icon, normally it only allows the drag operation to complete if the file's type is specifically registered as something the application can understand.

If you press Command-Option while dragging, it allows you to drop anything on any application.



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Command-Option-drag
Authored by: MJCube on Jul 20, '06 09:21:12PM

Yes, and you can add the Command & Option keys at any point; they don't have to be down before you click. I like to drag an icon to the Dock and check to see that it highlights the app icon. If not, just tap Command & Option to force it.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: igus on Jul 20, '06 09:01:57AM
Quicksilver, which has made me forget about double-clicking!

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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: boredzo on Jul 20, '06 09:25:53AM

You'll need to pause briefly before dragging the proxy icon. Otherwise the drag won't start, and you may end up dragging the window instead.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: barr104 on Jul 20, '06 10:16:51AM

command down arrow? Who at apple thought that made and sense. Well it works and it's easier than command-O so I'll probably use it. Whatever.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: GlowingApple on Jul 20, '06 10:47:29AM

Since Command+up goes up a folder, Command+down would naturally go down a folder. Since you have an application selected and there is no folder farther down (ignoring app bundles, though not handled as regular folders in the Finder) I guess someone though it would make sense to open the selected item then.

---
~Jayson <www.kempinger.homelinux.net>



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: googoo on Jul 20, '06 01:20:08PM

I think command-down arrow is supposed to be like pressing DOWN on the mouse button.

-Mark



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: barefootguru on Jul 20, '06 11:57:06AM

The ancient select a file and use File Open (or Open With) in the Finder's File menu…

If you have Finder toolbars turned on you can select the file and use the gear toolbar icon to Open or Open With…

You can ctrl-click (or click & hold) on the GraphicConverter icon in the Dock (and maybe others) and select 'Open…'

One of the many things I love about OS X over Windows is being able to select multiple files (including of different types) and double-clicking or hitting command-o.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: dcottle on Jul 20, '06 11:14:32PM

Has anyone mentioned control-click, then select Open with? Or right click, if your mouse is set to add the control modifier with a right click.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: trianglejuice on Jul 22, '06 12:08:39AM

Another "key-combination" that's not on the list:

Command-Alt-Down Arrow

If you have a Finder window with a file selected, this command will open the selected file and close the open Finder window. Very useful to prevent clutter.



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The many methods of opening a file
Authored by: squirri on Jul 22, '06 02:23:28PM

Ages ago I found a PDF that gave what appeared to be a pretty complete list of all keyboard shortcuts in Panther. It was nicely laid out and for ages I had it pinned on the wall next to my spanking new OSX machine.

I'm not sure if the list has changed that much over time(although Dashboard, Spotlight etc have come along since Panther)

It would be nice to have a single document with all of this information, preferabbly in an easy to view format that could be stuck up next to the machine - there are so many shortcuts that I, for one, can't remember them all.

Anyone have a good link?



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