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Capture windows which are larger than the screen System
Many people know that if you press Command-Shift-4, then press the space bar, you can make a screenshot of a window without the need to painfully select it using the marquee. The mouse pointer turns into a camera; point and click at the window you want to capture.

But it's even better than that: Even if the window is bigger (wider or taller) than the actual screen, the full content (including the stuff which is outside) is grabbed.

One minor issue: In most apps it is not possible to move a window out of the top of the screen, which would enable you to resize it bigger than the actual screen. Reason: The window is blocked by the menu bar. So if you try it with your secondary screen (in dual head mode), it works.
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Capture windows which are larger than the screen | 27 comments | Create New Account
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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: HalMac on Jul 05, '06 09:18:33AM

Add the Control key to the key sequence and the image you capture will be placed on the clipboard instead of being written to a file.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: rumirocks on Jul 05, '06 10:25:38AM

Great hint and additional comment. I was wrestling with this problem just last week. Now I've gotta see if this works with SnapProX.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: rumirocks on Jul 05, '06 10:28:23AM

I am happy to report that if you own SnapProX and do Command+Shift+3, then press the spacebar, it turns into a camera. When you press Return, everything on the dual monitors is snapped as one image.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: rumirocks on Jul 05, '06 10:31:58AM

Correction. I just tried doing that I reported above using SnapzProX a second time and it didn't work.
No comprende.



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Ok, I figured it out for SnapzProX to get both screens
Authored by: rumirocks on Jul 05, '06 10:41:22AM

1. Command+Shift+3 to invoke the SnapzProX app.
2. Command+Shift+4 (Cursor changes to crosshair in a circle)
3. Press Spacebar
4. Cursor changes to Camera
5. Move cursor off SnapzProX window, if you have it there, and entire window selected. If you have dual monitors, everything on both monitors selected.
6. Press Return to take the "picture."
7. SnapzProX window overlay will NOT be recorded.



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Ok, I figured it out for SnapzProX to get both screens
Authored by: landis on Jul 07, '06 10:04:04AM

Of course if you don't have SnapzProX you can just do Cmd+Shift+3 and take a picture of both monitors.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: cougar718 on Jul 05, '06 11:09:25AM

This hint is misleading.

If you use this method, it will *not* capture the entire contents of a window. Only the content that would be visible if the window was centered on the screen is captured.

I believe this is more geared towards having a window off to the side of the screen where the window in it's entirety is not visible and using this method of screen capture captures the entire window instead of part of the window.

Again: This method does not capture the entire contents of a window.

---
Rick alias cougar



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: osxpounder on Jul 05, '06 11:51:27AM

Works great for me. I tried 2 things: I moved this Firefox window so that most of it was off screen, at bottom of a 2-monitor setup. It was also slightly spanning across both monitors. CMD-OPT-4, Space, click, and I got exactly the screen cap described: the contents of the window, even the stuff off the screen.

Next, I zoomed the window to fill Monitor 1 again, and then stretched its corner so it spanned across both monitors. I moved the window to the left, and stretched it some more, so it spanned more than 2 monitors wide. Again, the screen cap got all the window's contents, no probs.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: magir on Jul 06, '06 12:53:05AM

I guess it depends on the application you use. If it paints its contents by itself it might not do that for outside content. Which application have you tried?



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Hint correct, some confusion over wording.
Authored by: gabester on Jul 06, '06 09:21:08AM

I think we're getting into semantic arguments over this...

When any window is completely visible on screen in Mac OS X, command-shift-4 followed by the spacebar bring up the camera element mode; you can then move the mouse/camera over the desired area you want to screenshot and the window's entire area will be captured. However, only the currently visible contents of that window will be in the screenshot; this hint does not intend to suggest otherwise - it merely is pointing out that you can capture a screenshot of a window that is larger than your screen in the same fashion as any window fully visible on your screen.

By having a window larger than your screen, however, you do not suddenly gain the ability to magically screenshot the entire contents of that window when you execute this hint, merely what would be the visible area of the contents of that window were your screen large enough to accommodate it.

<phew> I think I got that right.
g=



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The hint is _correct_
Authored by: Krioni on Jul 05, '06 11:21:12AM

I just tested this - I made a window _bigger_ than my screen and then tried what the hint suggests. It worked - the entire window was captured, not just the part that would fit on my screen, as Rick claims.

The hint is correct.

---
--
http://www.danshockley.com



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The hint is _incorrect_
Authored by: cougar718 on Jul 05, '06 11:51:16AM

To clear up any confusion:

The author of the hint notes that the 'full' content of a window is captured. The full content of a window is not captured - If a window contains many pages of text, those pages will not be captured. What is captured, is the entire window itself and the content that is visible at the time.

---
Rick alias cougar



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: clamstrip on Jul 05, '06 01:16:31PM


it only captures what is visible. there is a distinction between what is
"in" a window and what is visible. I argue that if a window has
a scroll bar, then you must scroll it in order to make visible everything
that is "in" it. by this definition, this hint does not capture everything "in"
a window.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: thiefhunter on Jul 05, '06 01:43:01PM

Cougar and clamstrip are right: you only capture what shows in the window, even if it's off your screen. But why not save the window as a pdf? Then you'd get the whole thing.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: nomadman on Jul 05, '06 04:13:12PM

Cougar718, clamstrip, and thiefhunter are incorrect. The hint claimed that one could "capture windows which are larger than the screen", and not *ALL* of the contents of a folder.

This is another distinction to be made: window vs. folder. A window is a view into a folder. The window defines what is visible from the folder contents. The hint claims to help you capture a whole window, that is the graphical view into the contents of a folder, not the contents of the folder.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: cougar718 on Jul 05, '06 04:58:12PM
I believe you are the one that is incorrect. We are in agreement that the hint claimed that one could "capture windows which are larger than the screen. What you fail to read is the fact the hint also claimed that it will capture the full content (including the stuff which is outside) ...
But it's even better than that: Even if the window is bigger (wider or taller) than the actual screen, the full content (including the stuff which is outside) is grabbed.

Your distinction is incorrect. Comparing a window to a folder is just flat out wrong. Look...

A window is a GUI element and is defined as a new view. The window contains _content_ which is to be viewed . When you close a window, you close the view and prevent the ability to see that _content_.

Content in this case is defined as all objects - text, images, frames, etc. which are a child of that window. Anything that is outside the window - buttons, text, etc., is not part of the contents of a window, but belongs to the window itself.

Given the above, the entire contents of window is not defined only by what is currently visible to the user, but what is not visible as well.

Bottom line: The hint's description is misleading. Instead of saying 'full content', the user should have said full window or window in it's entirety.

---
Rick alias cougar

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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: jacobolus on Jul 05, '06 02:39:24PM

If the window is resized using applescript, I believe much more can be captured. :)



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I was able to get the entire screen ...
Authored by: rumirocks on Jul 05, '06 05:26:34PM

I was able to get the entire screen by using the SnapzProX steps I gave above.

I have dual monitors. One is larger than the other. I got one image of both screens together, side-by-side. The smaller screen had white space below the dock to make up for large display of the second monitor beside it.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: tomem on Jul 05, '06 06:42:32PM

Works as advertised for me. It's easy to make a window wider than the screen, but as the hint says, impossible to make one taller than the screen unless you have a secondary monitor where the menubar does not get in the way. It would be nice if Apple would override this restriction. Once upon a time, windows had handles all around the edges, and this would then be possible, it seems.

---
TomEM
Crofton, MD



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: Gnarlodious on Jul 05, '06 07:46:17PM
Great hint, I did not know about the camera icon. I was able to take a picture of a very tall Finder window by moving it under the menubar with this Applescript, which I wrote for hiding windows:

tell application "Finder"
	set frontWindow to the front window
	set {x, y} to position of frontWindow
	set position of frontWindow to {x, 40}
end tell

Once the window is barely under the menubar, you can grab the edge and move it up as far as you want. I also wish Apple would activate this capability which was a very cool feature in OS9. As far as I know, this trick only works on Finder windows, since most apps do not allow window grabbing on the edge. Theoretically an Applescript could resize any scriptable window to an unreasonably long length to allow a fully sized screenshot.

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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: Gnarlodious on Jul 05, '06 08:05:00PM
I was able to take a full size screenshot of this very page in iCab by extending the window with a modified version of the Applescript below.

To see the resulting image look here: iCabLongWindow.png (1.8MB)

So yes, probably an Applescript could semi-automate the procedure.

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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: ever on Jul 06, '06 01:36:49AM

I can only get it to work in carbon apps.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: nomadman on Jul 05, '06 07:34:11PM
Incorrect again:
A window is a GUI element and is defined as a new view.
Agreed.
The window contains _content_ which is to be viewed . When you close a window, you close the view and prevent the ability to see that _content_.
Wrong. The winddow does not "contain content". The window is just, like you defined above, a view into the context of a directory. A graphical widget that lets you peek into a directory. The window does not contain anything. The directory does. The window is a resizable widget that "shows" you the directory's content. In any case, those are just programming abstractions (I am a GUI programmer). Your quote is of the original hint is misread though.
Even if the window is bigger (wider or taller) than the actual screen, the full content (including the stuff which is outside) is grabbed.
The "including the stuff which is outside" part was obviously making a reference to the previous clause "Even if the window is bigger (wider or taller) than the actual screen", and not to the "content" of the directory.

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Research is needed by you...
Authored by: cougar718 on Jul 06, '06 07:25:06PM

You need to get your facts straight before you tell someone they are wrong - Time and time again.

Fact:

In Mac OS X a window has what's called a content view which is the view that makes up the entire visible content under the title bar. The window owns, or is parent to, the content view which contains all the text boxes, labels, buttons, images, etc.

A window is _not_ some sort of port-hole into another world where all the views live like you imply. Stating that a window is a view into the context of a directory is nonsense. Graphical widget it may be, but certainly not a view into a directory.

Therefore, the original hint is worded wrong - It may appear correctly worded to those who have less knowledge about how the operating system and it's components actually work.

A person who _claims_ to be GUI programmer would/should know this. Obviously not.

---
Rick alias cougar



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Again, you choose to reinterpret what is written and ad your own twist.
Authored by: nomadman on Jul 06, '06 07:37:31PM
I never said, please point me to it if Im wrong, that I was a Cocoa GUI programmer. I am nevertheless a GUI programmer and for a big company too. Well paid and all, and everyone above me thinks Im pretty competent.
A window is _not_ some sort of port-hole into another world where all the views live like you imply.
I never said that either, but again you choose to bring quite a bit or re-interpretation on what people are writting here. There were no implications involved in my statement. As a GUI component, a window is a graphical view, as in MVC pattern, into the file system. This is true in Swing, and I doubt it would be too different in Cocoa. The GUI, or view, is never the Model, the files are not contained by the view, just re-presented by it. In this case, a graphical view, draws the contents of a directory for you, but its certainly not the container, as far as the filesystem goes.

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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: chyna4xena on Jul 06, '06 10:06:57PM

You guys are having a doozy of an argument, the latter stages of which I don't have anything to say about. I just wanted to point out something that I think is obvious: you could only say the original hint was 'incorrect' by demanding that the phrase "stuff which is outside" mean "stuff which is outside the window's current view" instead of "stuff which is outside the screen".

Previously in the sentence, the object "the screen" had been mentioned, but "the windows current view" had not. Therefore, it is grammatically incorrect to say that the implied object must be "the window's current view" - that object hadn't been mentioned, so it couldn't be an implied object!

The correct interpretation, the only sensible interpretation, of the parenthesised phrase is "stuff which is outside of the screen". You cannot use the phrase "full content" to argue otherwise, because they define their "full content" in the parenthesised phrase (it is not left with an ambiguous meaning) and as I said, according to the rules of English, the only object eligible to be considered as a possibility for the implied object in the parenthesised phrase is "the screen". You cannot simply throw whatever objects you want in there and then claim that the original poster is wrong.



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Capture windows which are larger than the screen
Authored by: nomadman on Jul 07, '06 05:40:47AM
You are right chyna4xena. And your point was my original argument before I got carried away into GUI theory. I quote myself:
The "including the stuff which is outside" part was obviously making a reference to the previous clause "Even if the window is bigger (wider or taller) than the actual screen", and not to the "content" of the directory.
There is no abiguity on the hint if you read it completely. It was gramatically clear that he was talking about the screen and not the window area. Reading the comments we can infer most readers got it as intended and quite liked the hint in fact. You said it better than me though. Thanks for bringing us back to the actual issue.

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