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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips Pick of the Week
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Note: As you may know, I was out for two weeks with our new daughter, and I returned needing to catch up on a couple Pick of the Week selections. Since I can't give these picks space in the site-top box (three entries is just too crowded), I thought I'd link to the other two "catch up" picks here, just so they have some chance of being seen. The April 24th pick is iChatExtender, and for May 1st, it's Conference Recorder 2. Both worth a look if you're an iChat user.

This week's pick is a bit odd, in that it's not actually a program. Instead, it's a 155 page PDF containing nothing but tips and tricks for using Firefox. I typically use three browsers -- Camino for most of my day-to-day stuff, Safari when I need to see what a site will look like for roughly 75% of the Mac users, and Firefox when I want to take advantage of its powerful add-on extensions. Of the three, Camino gets the most use, followed by Firefox and then Safari. The thing I love about Firefox is its open, extensible architecture. People can (and have!) write extensions to do nearly anything. The browser is also themable, and has an amazingly thorough set of configuration options. The challenge lies in figuring out which extensions and themes are good. Enter the Firefox Facts PDF booklet.

The booklet is a treasure trove of Firefox information. It contains a mix of tips, pointers to (and descriptions of) useful extensions and themes, and references to other websites with even more Firefox information. I've been using Firefox (and its predecessors) for many years now, but I still found this booklet to be a fascinating and useful read. I've already installed four more extensions based on what I've read about, and I'm only halfway through the book.

Beyond the booklet, if you're a Firefox user, the Firefox Facts website itself is a very useful resource. For instance, a recent tip pointed to this write-up, a constantly updated list of the "50 best" Firefox extensions for 'power surfers.' Perusing the list, I again found a couple of useful tools that I hadn't previously installed.

The booklet (and the site) are a great resource for Firefox users -- whether you're new to the browser or if you've been using it for a while, you'll more than likely find some useful tidbits inside. Thanks to Mitch Keeler, Bob Fogarty, and Chris Pirillo for writing and editing the booklet -- it collects a ton of good information in one well-written and easy-to-search PDF.
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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips | 13 comments | Create New Account
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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: momerath on May 10, '06 08:39:01AM

Once firefox can store passwords in the apple keychain, I will probably start using it. Does anyone know if this is possible?



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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: perturb on May 11, '06 05:12:25AM
Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: syko on May 10, '06 08:39:52AM

IT's great to hear you're a Camino user, but I finally switched away from it-- even with the current releases, it wasn't stable enough. Spinning beach ball or it'd just quit.. how stable is it for you?

Been using Omniweb and Safari for day to day and FF for a few things.



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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: rb3 on May 10, '06 09:03:58AM

For what it's worth, the new Camino on my PowerMac Dual Gig G4 MDD runs well, and never crashes. Occasionally I see the SPOD, but that's also usually because I should buy more RAM, and not Camino's fault.

I miss some of Safari, but not that much, and I fire up FireFox whenever I need some of its extension power.

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512Ke, SE/30, 7500, PMG4/DualGig



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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: stilabel2 on May 11, '06 05:50:36PM

Camino is my primary browser and I have yet to experience any spinning beach ball. I have an iMac G5 with 2Gig of memory. I prefer it most of the time to Firefox and almost never use Safari

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Michael E. Abell



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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: covisp on May 19, '06 07:24:09PM

Camino seems to be less buggy in terms of Rainbowing that Firefox. I just wish it supported more plugins.


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http://www.covisp.net



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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: tinker on Oct 07, '06 08:34:46AM

If you're running Camino with Quicksilver and the spinning beach ball of death happens when you're trying to download things, it could be the Camino Quicksilver bug. Disable cataloguing of your desktop in Quicksilver (or set Camino to download elsewhere), and clean out your download history. Should work like a charm.



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tab extensions
Authored by: kholburn on May 11, '06 12:24:03AM

I have used a couple of tab extensions in Firefox for a while most recently tabfx to give me close boxes on each tab like safari.

This book mentioned an extension called "too many tabs" which looked interesting but while looking at it I found another one "Tab Mix Plus" which does similar things.

Tab Mix Plus puts a close box on each tab and one in the tab line as well if you want it and multiple tabs rows if necessary which is awesome and a bunch of other things like a menu to clone a tab to another window, reopen tabs you've closed and the ability save sessions.

It also has a load bar on each tab when the page is loading. Very nice.



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very good news for Firefox users
Authored by: perturb on May 11, '06 05:32:11AM
Mozilla bug 332579 (modestly titled "Improve Mac event handling for 1.8.1") has been fixed, reviewed, and merged to a production branch.

When this work eventually makes it into official builds (e.g. Firefox 2.0) it will solve problems like the ancient "Holding down mouse button forces 100% CPU on Macs" issue (141710) and it lays the groundwork for further Mac-specific improvement. Kudos to Mark Mentovai.

"Mark, would you expect this build to provide significant performance benefits over a standard build without the event handling changes? That appears to be the case" ...

"Absolutely. Current "standard" builds are based on an event loop that's basically spinning when it doesn't need to be. The key architectural change here is that the loop goes to sleep until something actually happens. There are also side benefits in the elimination of a bunch of dead code paths that would execute frequently. These paths were useful on OS 9 but are dead ends on OS X."



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But can you make it less fugly?
Authored by: Lectrick on May 12, '06 08:24:17AM

the only reason i keep switching between Safari and FF is because Safari is WAY more "mac-like"...

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In /dev/null, no one can hear you scream



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But can you make it less fugly?
Authored by: ZZamboni on May 13, '06 03:05:07PM
Take a look at the GrApple themes - they make firefox remarkably Mac-like. I've been using them for a while, and they really make firefox blend much better with the rest of the Mac environment.

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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: TClarke on May 12, '06 02:07:05PM

You mention, Robg, that you use Camino most. Do you, or anyone, happen to know any way in Camino of toggling JavaScript on and off without going into preferences, as one can in Firefox (NoScript extension) and in Opera(supplied tool-bar button)?



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Firefox Facts ebook - A great collection of Firefox tips
Authored by: dumas on May 17, '06 07:03:26AM

This book didn't impress me. It seems to be a completely unedited and unselective collection of many tips from a web site. Often a later "chapter" contains different and more up to date advice on the same topic as an earlier chapter, so you can't trust what you read unless you've checked the whole book for later, more up to date information.



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