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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop System 10.4
Tiger only hintI've been using Disk Utility a lot lately to make disk images from folders. The process is somewhat tedious, so I searched Hints for alternative methods. In this hint, I learned that in 10.2 there was an application called Disk Copy that supported drag-and-drop onto its dock icon. When Disk Copy's functionality was later rolled into 10.3's Disk Utility, the feature was quietly dropped.

In 10.4, this feature has apparently been quietly reintroduced. Dragging and dropping a folder on Disk Utility's dock icon once again results in a prompt to create a new disk image using the dropped folder.
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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop | 10 comments | Create New Account
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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: wwelsh39 on Apr 12, '06 07:36:03AM

I just tried this and Disk Utility works just as you said it would. Please forgive my ignorance, but what is the benefit of having a "disk image" of a folder? I compared the size of the folder and it's disk image and they are almost identical.



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: Brontojoris on Apr 12, '06 07:42:20AM

There are several reasons you might wish to make an Disk Image

- Disk Images can be encrypted and password protected/
- The resource forks for any files inside the Disk Image will be safe if moved to a filesystem that does not support resource forks.
- Disk Images can be compressed.
- Disk Images can be saved for burning to CD later.



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: dogboy on Apr 12, '06 08:52:39AM

Also, it keeps things out of Spotlight queries and stops them being indexed by utilities like Quicksilver.
For instance, I keep my icons on a disc image. Many of them have the same name and icon as my applications, and it's a pain having Photoshop fire up with the iCal icon instead of iCal itself.



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: osxpounder on Apr 12, '06 04:21:00PM

dogboy, thanks for pointing out that Spotlight tip. I keep lots of icons, too, as well as files with really long names that often include the name of the app I made 'em with [because I share them with others or put them on other computers]. I'm gonna stash the icons in a dmg from now on.

Also thanks to the original poster. I've been making dmg files the long way.

Here's my dmg tip: use an encrypted dmg to keep printed PDFs of any online receipts, bill payments, sensitive emails, text files with passwds ... anything you want to protect, yet have ready access to, on your Mac. When I'm about to pay bills online, I double-click my encrypted dmg, type in the password, and pay bills, printing the confirmation pages to PDF on that dmg. When I'm done, I eject the dmg [it's a .sparseimage, so it grows as I add files to it]. If I need to back up that info to put in the safe deposit box at the bank [in case there's a house fire or the Mac gets burgled], it's just one file to burn to CD.

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osxpounder



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: MtnBiker on Apr 12, '06 09:18:07AM

If you're done with a project and you've created many versions of parts of the project (or even if there is no duplication) you can make a disk image and later open the image and retrieve something you need without unzipping the whole mess and having to remember to delete the unzipped files.

If you upgrade a product like Photoshop with many files in the app folder you can dmg the folder and then go back and grab pieces you need.

In summary, you can use it the same as zip, but later look at the files (open or copy them from the disk image) without having to delete the unzipped file after a quick look. You can of course copy many small disk images to a archive CD or DVD and use it as described.

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Hermosa Beach, CA USA



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: jiclark on Apr 12, '06 08:50:33AM

Sorry for the tangent, but this reminds me that I was at a client's place on Monday and discovered that one guy had somehow been creating .dmg files of some of his folders, and he had no idea how, let alone what they were and how they worked!?!

Does anyone here have any ideas about how he might be unintentionally doing this? I realize that this hint implies that he might be dragging and dropping folders on Disk Utility in the dock, but there are several reasons that's unlikely to be the case. One, he's still using Panther; two, the .dmg files are buried in his user folder, and not necessarily in the same directory as the folder that's been converted. Weird, eh?



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: dogboy on Apr 12, '06 09:01:19AM

This works with Quicksilver, too. And probably Launchbar and Butler.
If I choose to open a folder with Disk Utility via Quicksilver, it pops open the same dialog as mentioned in the hint. Cool!



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: DylanMuir on Apr 13, '06 12:58:36AM

Or you can use the hdiutil utility from the terminal.

hdiutil create -srcfolder (folder name)

will do the trick, and is scriptable.

DRM



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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: adrianm on Mar 16, '07 12:12:06PM
plus, hdiutil (and Disk Utility with a defaults hack) can use bzip2 for compression instead of zlib, eg:

hdiutil create -srcfolder folder -format UDBZ archive.dmg
Depending on what you're compressing, this can make quite a difference, but is 10.4 only.

Another nice thing about DMGs is that they can be mounted over a network, so if you just need a handful of files from an archive, you don't have to download the whole thing.

For general archiving, and Mac-to-Mac copying I always use DMGs, as they are just so much more useful. For sharing with Windows, I use ZIP, or gzipped tar files.

Stuffit is dead.

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10.4: Create DMGs in Disk Utility via drag and drop
Authored by: adrianm on Mar 16, '07 12:13:38PM

oops, posting to wrong forum :) please ignore

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