Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!

An easy way to record streaming audio Internet
In the past, I have jumped through a number of different hoops to digitize streaming audio (e.g. NPR's Car Talk using RealPlayer). I've used WireTap, but you can't set it to a timer and it won't encode MP3s. I also used Soundflower or Jack to route the output to Amadeus II, which has a timer and does MP3s, but it's such a hassle to set up when I don't use Soundflower for anything else. Or I've tried the trick of patching the output mini-jack to the input mini-jack, then recording in whatever app I choose (make sure Playthrough isn't selected). This is also a hassle (finding the cable, checking levels to make sure it's set up correctly, etc.).

But here is the easiest and quickest solution, bearing in mind I'm not going for high quality audio, just intelligible voice: Speaker to internal microphone. Connect to the website stream and, as soon as it begins playing, launch your favorite audio recording program (Audio Companion, Amadeus, Sound Studio -- I usually have one of them running all the time), and start it recording. Bingo, done.

Turns out that the internal microphone, which is usually my default setting, does an acceptable job of recording the built-in speakers. No additional routing required. Record with a timer (Amadeus II) set to the length of the stream, encode to MP3 in real time or on save. Much easier.
    •    
  • Currently 2.40 / 5
  You rated: 4 / 5 (5 votes cast)
 
[36,973 views]  

An easy way to record streaming audio | 21 comments | Create New Account
Click here to return to the 'An easy way to record streaming audio' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
Audio Hijack Pro
Authored by: robtain on Apr 06, '06 08:03:27AM

My suggestion would be to try Audio Hijack Pro. It has a built-in timer function and can be used to send RealPlayer, Windows Media Player or iTunes to specific URL at a given time or on a recurring schedule.

Rob



[ Reply to This | # ]
Audio Hijack Pro
Authored by: RandyChev on Apr 06, '06 12:05:54PM

If you are an information junkie like me you have to get Audio Hijack Pro. Of course you can record anything that you can hear on your Mac. But you can also record something while the sound is muted from that source without muting the whole Mac audio. And you can record more than one audio source at a time. With enough CPU power you could record an mp3 radio stream, a web based radio stream, a Realplayer stream, and record an audio tape patched in through your microphone input all at the same time, all muted so you can get some work done too.

I (actually my Mac) records a local radio show that is streamed by mp3 and AHP puts a bookmarkable AAC file for each hour in my iTunes folder with the tags set so that I find them in in my smart playlist after I sync my iPod each morning.

I have no affiliation with Rogue Amoeba (http://www.rogueamoeba.com/) the authors of the software other than I paid for the program and use it daily. Best audio recorder I've ever bought.

Last I looked you can download a fully functioning version that will let you record as long as you want but will put static in the audio after 10 minutes. Very scriptable and great technical support from the company.

Okay, end of plug.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Audio Hijack Pro
Authored by: osxpounder on Apr 06, '06 01:46:51PM

I will add that I've used Audio Hijack Pro for over a year now, professionally, to snag audio from various sources for busy university professors. I've found it reliable on both a dual G5 powerhouse and an old G4 733Mhz with 512-768MB RAM [I upgraded RAM recently in that one]. I can confidently recommend it for recording audio on your Mac, because I've learned I can rely on it and can keep promises based on knowing it'll get the job done.

That said, I have never tried scheduling a recording with AHP, because I also own a radioSHARK at home and the only scheduled things I wanted to record unattended have been local radio shows.

---
--
osxpounder



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: foilpan on Apr 06, '06 08:17:09AM
i've been using the hint referenced here and have had no problems. http://www.macosxhints.com/article.php?story=20050130184054216

[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: dcottle on Apr 06, '06 08:50:04AM

I forgot to mention I'm using a laptop, where the speaker is right next to the internal microphone.

Also, as I said, the point of this hint is that it is really easy: for me at least. No additional software, patching, or setup required. That is to say, it's already set up, so to speak, since the speaker is right next to the microphone.



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: monickels on Apr 06, '06 09:25:39AM

Wow, the quality of those recordings must really suck. Sounds like you went to a lot of trouble figuring this out when Audio Hijack Pro would do the job for a very reasonable price.

---
Double-Tongued Word Wrester: a growing dictionary of old and new words from the fringes of English.



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: tommyw on Apr 06, '06 09:49:30AM

And of course, just to clarify it, Wire Tap Pro will record MP3s and act on a timer. Sucks in Audio from wherever and outputs it in whatever format.

It mightn't be as full featured as Audio HiJack Pro but it's cheaper and simpler. Does the trick for me.



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: dcottle on Apr 07, '06 02:39:27PM

Well, as I said, I'm recording speech. So I don't care that much. And they aren't that bad. Streaming audio is pretty poor to begin with. For the record (and I'll regret this I'm sure), I do and teach digital audio for a living (flame on). So I know how to do high end. One of the things we discuss in class is whether it's worth going to all that trouble for high end when you just need it to be good enough for speech.



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: 010111 on Apr 07, '06 04:09:08PM

your students should seriously look into getting their money back for such a class.

this isn't a difference between "high end" and low-end. it's a difference between correct and incorrect.

if any connection in an audio or video chain besides the input or output is *AIR* you have a problem. if you do not understand this you should not be teaching anything having to do with audio or video production.

you can rationalize it all you want. it is still incorrect. and a very poor hint.

it's akin to suggesting a convenient way to record streaming video would be to set up a video camera and point it at the screen. and then rationalize the pisspoor quality and total inappropriateness of the "solution" by saying i don't 'need high end' or that 'streaming video is low quality anyway'. give me a break. and give your students their money back.



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: dcottle on Apr 10, '06 08:31:45PM

Man, I am such a loser!



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: chyna4xena on Apr 10, '06 09:27:51PM
010111, that is the silliest comment I have ever read.

Clearly, what is "correct" and "incorrect" does change depending on the circumstances. In fact, using gear or setups that are too high-end for a given context is absolutely incorrect, because you waste the extra resources, personnel and time those high-end systems need, and you are getting NO benefit (because the extra quality is not needed). Spending time and money, or energy, for no benefit, is as "incorrect" as it gets. This is something that is taught in all fields of digital recording.

From your theory, I could state that watching a videocassette is an incorrect way of viewing a movie - DVDs have much higher quality and resolution. But it is incorrect to watch DVDs, because the MPEG2 compression system introduces artefacts, and the resolution is not the best - you really ought to go to the theatre. Ah, but the theatre is incorrect, too, because they only screen copies of the prints, they don't have the original, perfect prints themselves. Do you see how it is silly to suggest that any level is "incorrect" ? Every level is "correct" if it is of sufficient quality to satisfy the viewer.

The submitter made it pefectly clear that they understood, and did not mind, the loss of quality involved in this method. The hint wasn't (I cannot stress this enough) "Record high-quality audio", the hint was, "An easy way to record audio (at low quality levels)".

I think his students are well-served by an educator who knows that any one solution is not the perfect setup for every single instance, and that extra work for no benefit is wasted work ... but they probably know that already, as most humans do, as you apparently do not.

He wants to record low quality, streamed, spoken audio, and he wants to do it easily. He is happy with the quality, so for goodness' sake, what on Earth is "incorrect" about that?

[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: dcottle on Apr 17, '06 01:48:51PM

(I posted a response earlier but haven't seen it. Sorry if this is redundant.)

I considered a more reasoned response such as chyna, but 010111 was basically saying I'm a loser for not doing things the way he would, so I figured I'd give in.

We have some very nice equipment, but in committee meetings I use my internal mic at 11k 8 bit because it transfers to the director's jump drive faster, it opens in her editor faster (than an mp3), and it's good enough for what she needs. And yes, clients and students are both grateful to work with someone who has nothing to prove by throwing time, money, and all the gear he has access to at every project. But I do realize most engineers don't think that way, so I usually give in when challenged. Do it how you want. This works for me. (And actually, the quality is pretty good.)



[ Reply to This | # ]
Ghetto
Authored by: bedouin on Apr 06, '06 07:27:07PM

Replace 'easy' with 'ghetto.'

This was like when we were kids and shoved tissue into prerecorded tapes and then put two boomboxes beside each other to 'dub.'



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: treck on Apr 06, '06 08:57:10PM

Wow, I am literally amazed that Mr. Hinckley would post this kind of info and think of it as a hint...

---
treck



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: blgrace on Apr 06, '06 10:15:29PM

I recently discovered that if I turn up the volume of my TV (in the next room) and connect a series of vacuum cleaner hoses to reach up close to my isight microphone . . . blah blah balh.. etc.



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: dcottle on Apr 07, '06 02:54:10PM

Ok, ok. I retract the hint. I keep forgetting that audio is a religion to some people. I've done it all the other ways including HiJack and Wiretap and ProTools and Logic and Amadeus ii, Audio Hack, half-track, CoolEdit, quarter-track, even Sound Designer II when it first came out. I like this way. It's fast, easier than connecting tubes between two TVs, and has precedence (Alvin Lucier; I'm just realizing his "I am sitting in a room"). Use Hi Jack if you want. And besides, this is "roy hinckley" speaking. I have coconuts over my speakers for amplification.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Mic does 24bit 96KHz recording!!
Authored by: egz4u2 on Apr 07, '06 11:21:39PM

Hint says capturing low quality spoken word NPR.

Perhaps the details are missing here......

I have a lot of recording experience, mixing, mastering, etc. I just replaced a PB lost in fire, ( with ALL gear!) it was bertha 17" PB G4 1.67GHz. I was in some cafe, and curious, I hit record..... it's mono - speaker also mono - but amazing performance.......
Yeah, there is a S/PDIF I/O - but the microphone ( Actually are there two? ) actually had a great clear sound, it surprised me, the old Plain Talk was a bit longer than stereo 1/8" mini - kicked on a Mic Amp ( which was over 15 years old..... fine for - yeah telephony.....

But everyone asked where the gear was.... no one asked Mic type.... If you look in About this Mac/ More Info - System profiler - Audio

It records 24 bit/ 96KHz - OK, the speaker on a PB lacks a subwoofer, ROFL.... but the Mic is actually an amazing hunk of technology. Core Audio uses 32 bit floats..... and I'd record with 2 in stereo ANY TIME!

I believe in time, I see MP3 & AAC as standard - not even a CD. That is amazing for a built in mic! Very classy Apple....



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: taxi on Apr 07, '06 02:28:12AM
I use mplayer, which is very simple to set up to dump RealPlayer streams to disk, and wrote a bash function to make this easier: RealDump

[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: linnig on Apr 07, '06 04:37:32AM

I'm surprised no one has mentioned RadioLover

http://www.bitcartel.com/radiolover/

I've been using it to record NPR shows streamed over the internet for a year or so. I find it very reliable. It records the show via a timer and can then move it into iTunes automatically. It can record multiple streams simultaneously. It sets the MP3 tags to the name of the show and the recording date. Good stuff.

A happy user



[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: sjk on Apr 07, '06 04:53:41PM
RadioLover only records MP3 streams. I'm still using iNet Stream Archiver for that because I prefer its history and methods for handling duplicates and automatically organizes recordings. But RadioLover adds tracks to iTunes more reliably.

iRecordMusic records RealAudio, WindowsMedia, et.al. See Product Comparision - RadioLover vs iRecordMusic for more info.

[ Reply to This | # ]
An easy way to record streaming audio
Authored by: umijin on Apr 09, '06 07:05:21PM

You might also try a free app called "Radio Recorder" (http://u1.netgate.net/~snowcat/RadioRecorder.html) which allows you to save internet radio streams to mp3 format.

I believe you can also set the recording time.



[ Reply to This | # ]