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How to update a modified WEP key Network
I have changed WEP key on my router for security reasons. However, even after I deleted my wireless network from the preferred network list, and re-added it with the new WEP password, it would still use old one.

As I found out latter, the WEP key is stored in the keychain, and must be updated by using Keychain Access (in Applications -> Utilities).
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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: SteamSHIFT on Feb 15, '06 07:03:01AM

I had a similar problem after switching from WEP to WPA encryption; my mac insisted on trying to use the old password (and/or maybe encryption method) to authenticate itself. In the end, I just changed the name of the wireless access point and it all sorted itself out.

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Andy Bennett
SteamSHIFT



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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: kL on Feb 15, '06 09:56:44AM

I hope you realize that WEP is not secure anyway.



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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: schaps on Feb 15, '06 11:03:07AM

It's more secure than nothing at all. It will keep honest people honest (like those mini locks you can buy for your luggage).



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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: quangtonthat on Feb 15, '06 07:43:31PM

WPA is the way to go. It is so much easier to manage and safer, probably gives you better performance than the out-dated and unsafe WEP.



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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: schaps on Feb 16, '06 07:20:43AM

yes, we all know that, but WPA is still relatively 'new' and there is a lot of older equipment out there that is not WPA capable. For example, our small school's wireless network.

We have 24 teacher PCs with old D-Link 802.11b wireless cards in them which cannot do WPA, nor be firmware upgraded, so they do 128 bit WEP until funds can be secured to upgrade all the cards. None of the teachers have file sharing enabled, and the rest of the network is the eMac lab running Tiger, so I am not too worried about hackers. At least, I cannot lose sleep over it, because I cannot help it right now. Convincing them to get the eMac lab was my big success, though, but we spent the whole grant/gift money on that and had to skimp on the teachers' network.



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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: wesw02 on Feb 25, '06 04:41:20PM

I hope you know that your off topic, and not addressing the issue.



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How to update a modified WEP key
Authored by: schaps on Feb 15, '06 11:09:31AM

This is a bug in Airport, I think, that they haven't thought of. It happens to me so often as I configure and reconfigure wireless networks, I don't even realize I am going into the keychain to delete it anymore.

If you attempt to connect automatically to an access point and it cannot, and the password is stored in the keychain, Airport client should give you the option to delete the saved password and enter a new one.

Does Apple think no one will ever change their encryption keys and passwords?



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Using WEP is crazy
Authored by: tttyyy on Feb 16, '06 12:05:04PM

Unless you absolutely have to, using WEP is stupid. WEP is completely insecure. Not in an intangible, theoretical way, but in a my-10-year-old-can-download-any-one-of-dozens-of-tools-and-crack-it-in-5-minutes kind of way. And people are doing it all the time. WPA (or WPA2) is basically no harder and provides real security.

You don't want to run WEP. Really. Stop.



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Using WEP is crazy
Authored by: schaps on Feb 16, '06 01:13:37PM

Not crazy, sometimes it's all you have. See my posts above.

Been going 6 months, no security breaches yet (I watch the logs for IPs).

It depends also on your area. We're two blocks from a free WiFi cafe, and a neighbor has an open wireless to leach off of.



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crazy or not
Authored by: sjk on Feb 16, '06 07:23:24PM

I'm using WDS between a Linksys WRT54G (downstairs) and AirPort Express (upstairs), the latter primarily for EyeHome and AirTunes connectivity. The generic Linksys firmware doesn't support WPA over WDS. Since there's no sensitive data going over the WLAN I decided not to use WEP and just set up basic non-broadcast SSID and MAC address filtering. I haven't felt like messing with third party firmware up to now but that'll change if Linksys doesn't add WDS+WPA support soon or other circumstances change. I'm aware of what I'm doing and potential vulnerabilities. I don't foresee my WLAN remaining this open much longer.

Neighbors here have open networks, one using a Linksys router (default SSID, gosh) with an impressive signal in the garage (a.k.a. break room) that I've infrequently borrowed to finish something online (like posting something on a blog, forum, etc.) when my WLAN drops out of range, typically when another neighbor's on her 2.4GHz phone. One time I launched iTunes and was amused to notice a shared library but certainly wouldn't go snooping. Now I'm working on optimizing router placement, without compromising EyeHome/AirTunes performance, with the added benefit of avoiding temptation to borrow the neighbor's net. And maybe I'll even offer them some network security services.



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crazy or not
Authored by: chris234 on Feb 16, '06 09:30:46PM

Keep in mind that "hidden" SSIDs and MAC filtering make WEP look like high security in comparison.....



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high (in)security
Authored by: sjk on Feb 17, '06 06:54:17PM

Yep, I'm not fooling myself into a false sense of security with what I'm (not) doing. Now that my routers are in better locations I'll work on resolving the WDS+WPA issue.



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Using WEP is crazy
Authored by: merlyn on Feb 20, '06 06:16:02AM
I use WEP on my personal home network specifically because I don't care. In fact, my password is painfully obvious, and my guests laugh when I tell them.

I run WEP only to prevent the casual user from joining my network instead of an open network, and as a defense in case someone did try to use my home network for nefarious activities, because I can claim in court that "my net was encrypted and they had to break that encryption". Nevermind that it wasn't hard, but I've seen enough court time up close to know that this would suffice. Legally, there's a world of difference between an unlocked door and a locked door. The brand of lock doesn't matter, unless you can argue that the contents justified a stronger lock.

So, don't be disrepecting WEP. There are times when it's completely appropriate. But yes, you have to understand what you're accomplishing with the encryption.

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Using WEP is crazy
Authored by: wesw02 on Feb 25, '06 04:43:03PM

Why post when you do not address the issue?



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