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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked Internet
If you travel, or use your laptop at wireless hot spots, you've probably discovered that even though you can read your .Mac email using Apple Mail, many of these providers block access to SMTP, forcing you to send your messages through web mail rather than the Mail app itself. Some people probably find this more secure, and it is, but I'm a creature of habit, and I've got Mail set up with various handy filters that sort my messages and trash spam, etc., which makes it far more convenient to do my mail reading and replying within Mail itself.

Unfortunately, as mentioned above, lots of providers block SMTP, so replying to messages within Mail results in an error. Here's the trick I've discovered to allow sending mail through Mail -- save your email as a Draft, then log onto the .Mac website and complete the sending from there. If you have several messages to send, save them all as Drafts. It's rather strange behavior, when you think about it, that a provider will block access to SMTP, but allow you to upload your drafts to your mail server. But they do. And for someone who's a creature of habit like I am, it's a simple solution to an annoying problem.
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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked | 21 comments | Create New Account
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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: AaronAdams on Jan 18, '06 07:23:37AM

If SMTP over port 25 is being blocked, you can use .Mac's alternate SMTP port.

http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=75124

The article says it applies to 10.4.2 or earlier, but it applies to 10.4.3 and 10.4.4 as well.



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: mm2270 on Jan 18, '06 07:53:05AM

That's exactly right. Our company blocks port 25, as do many providers, because that is the most common port used by spammers that take over a system to send mass emails out. Use port 587 and it should allow it to go through. Much easier than savings emails as drafts, etc.



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: slowe on Jan 18, '06 11:21:59AM

The alternate SMTP port described in your hint and referenced in the Apple document is a proposed standard from the IETF for mail submission. It's intended to be used by MUAs (e-mail clients) for submitting messages to MTAs (e-mail servers), and it's strongly recommended that authentication and encryption (via STARTTLS) be required. The idea is that this allows ISPs to tightly control server-to-server traffic (which will still occur over TCP port 25) while permitting client-to-server traffic (which will now occur over TCP port 587).

Note that .Mac is not unique in their use of port 587; Gmail also supports it.



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Change the port from 25 to 587
Authored by: j-beda on Jan 18, '06 07:38:53AM
According to the .mac help pages: http://help.apple.com/mac2/1/help/mail/pgs/mac31.html

Note: Some ISPs restrict access to the TCP port (25) used by SMTP. If your ISP is blocking port 25, you can use your email application to change the port to 587 and try again.

Thus, you might just be able to change the port over to 587 which should work even if port 25 is blocked.



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: schaps on Jan 18, '06 08:38:07AM

When working at public hotspots, I always check whether my system is sending out cleartext username password combos using DsnifFE. .Mac through port 25 does, and the POP does as well. I therefore disable .Mac when on a public wireless network. I'll have to try this alternate port trick to see if it makes a difference. However, I don't discount the fact that real hackers might also be scanning for alternate ports used by major ISPs.

However, I have a Comcast cable modem, and Comcast requires you to use SSL authentication and alternate port when connecting to POP and SMTP from other networks. Their settings work even when on a Comcast network, too, so I leave them on all the time. This way, no one is able to snatch my login/password.

Google's Gmail does this also, the only difference being you cannot use a vanity "@mydomain.com" e-mail address when sending through Gmail's SSL SMTP - well you can, but it gets changed to your Gmail address when it goes through.

SSL - don't settle for anything less!



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: Anonymous on Jan 18, '06 09:01:23AM

I use ssl on dot mac. Port 587 supports this and i use imap secure on port 993

I presume POP will have a secure option i think port 995 ??

I would urge people to use this service then removes a chance of your dotmac password becoming compromised.

In the old days you would have to pay for SSL now it come as standard with good ISP's



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: schaps on Jan 18, '06 11:40:23AM

awesome, that did not used to be the case. Does .Mac mail still require you to send "from" your @mac.com e-mail address? I guess I could try it... I have about 20 different "from" addresses with the various jobs and organizations I am involved in. They all filter into 2 Gmail accounts for the excellent spam filtering. Between them, there are over 103,000 junk mails in the Spam folders from the past 30 days.

Anyway, with Comcast SSL SMTP, I can use any "from" address I like. Gmail changes it to Gmail, and .Mac used to just stop it from going out. Again, wonder if that's still the case-- will check it tonight.

Thanks for the tip...



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: Trunkmonkey on Jan 18, '06 10:13:34AM

Uhhh...instead of disabling your .Mac accounts you could just use SSL. After all, you did mention SSL at the bottom of your post. ;)



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: schaps on Jan 18, '06 11:12:49AM

uhh (whatever language that is...)
Didn't know till I read the comment above you that SSL was allowed. It was not offered as of a few years ago, and since then I've used my Comcast.

Good for Apple.



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: edcroteau on Jan 18, '06 05:30:46PM

I was under the impression that .Mac uses SSL for login/password even at a hotspot ... now I'm concerned ...

Thanks,

Ed



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still insecure without SSL
Authored by: rumirocks on Jan 18, '06 10:19:34PM

This is very unsettling. Everything is sent clear text when accessing .Mac on a public wireless network?!?!?!

Can someone explain this some more? What are you supposed to do when you're traveling and in a hotel somewhere? How do you alter the .Mac web-based email prefs? They dont have any stinkin' prefs.



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: kirkmc on Jan 18, '06 08:48:12AM

Um, saving as a draft only works if your .Mac email account is set up as IMAP. (Mine is set as POP.) Does IMAP also use SMTP to send?

---
Read my blog: Kirkville -- http://www.mcelhearn.com
Musings, Opinion and Miscellanea, on Macs, iPods and more



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: the_webmaestro on Jan 18, '06 09:16:49AM

It does for me. I use .Mac+Mail.app via IMAP, and SMTP for sending. I used to just 'send mail' from .Mac (write the whole darn thing...) but this tip looks cool. As for changing the port, that sounds even cooler!

---
Father of Jeremy Logan



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: stewarsh on Jan 18, '06 11:33:51AM

Depends on what you mean. IMAP and POP are both network protocols for accessing stored mail from your mailserver. They have nothing to do with routing(sending) mail; that's what SMTP does. So regardless of whether you're using IMAP or POP, you still have to have an SMTP server defined to send any e-mail.

Now in Tiger's Mail.app; if you specify an account type of .Mac you get an IMAP/SMTP connection.



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: m5comp on Jan 18, '06 09:18:10AM

Earthlink normally blocks port 25, but it's not blocked for .Mac's smtp server (special dispensation, I guess).



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: letartes on Jan 18, '06 01:14:40PM

My way to send emails when the smtp is blocked is to use the mac built in mail server. Just open a terminal window and type :

sudo postfix start

you will be prompted to enter you password. Then, you add 127.0.0.1 to your outgoing mail server list in mail. That is it. Postfix will stay active until your next reboot.



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: schaps on Jan 18, '06 01:27:50PM

OK, could you give some more details, please?
Trying to start postfix (on 10.3.9) results in:
"postfix/postfix-script: fatal: the Postfix mail system is already running"

Set SMTP server to 127.0.0.1 anyway, tried to send test message:
"The attempt to read data from the server "127.0.0.1" failed."

If that's not the correct SMTP setting, could you give an example?

Thanks..



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: jeremyp on Jan 19, '06 09:48:27AM

That won't work. Postfix uses port 25 to send e-mails out too. If port 25 is blocked, it won't be able to send them. Most likely it'll just queue e-mails until it can send them.



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: tomem on Jan 18, '06 05:21:16PM

WOW! Thanks so much for the outstanding hint and followup comments!

My employer is very fussy about security and will not allow SMTP for personal accounts. We set up a more "flexible" server of our own, and have used it for years to get personal email out of the site, but it was a bit of a pain, waiting for the first try to time out and ask for a different server. Also I'm not happy about running personal email through an employers server, having it all logged for prying eyes, etc. and was infurated that I could not use my own resources on the web for my own email.

Port 587 worked first try and it's nice to know one can set up a server of one's own in a pinch if the security cops get wise and shut down still more ports.

Thanks again,
Tom Moore

---
TomEM
Crofton, MD



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: Renegades on Dec 16, '10 07:08:12PM

Mac's Mail ... it sucks!

In every decent mail client you can configure POP port as well as SMTP port ... in Mac's MAIL - you can't!

We use our own mail-servers and use port 26 for SMTP. Working with MAIL on a MAC, it is impossible to use your own mail-servers, the routing will always stay problematic and hence no matter what you declare, ISPs will block you since you'll never be able to be identified as YOU !

When will MAC's Super Staff with 369 rewards and 792 diplomas realize their stuff-up with MAIL? Maybe they should go and get another few diplomas first



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How to send .Mac mail when SMTP is blocked
Authored by: dgerrity on Apr 17, '11 01:03:23PM
For SMTP:
  1. Mail | Preferences | Accounts
  2. Accounts Information tab
  3. Click on the account of interest
  4. Select "Outgoing Mail Server (SMTP): and pull it down, select Edit SMTP Server List...
  5. Advanced tab
There you can pick any server, any port, choose ssl or not, and select from a list of authentication methods.

For POP, use the same process as above to setup the SMTP server. To alter POP inbound settings:

  1. Mail | Preferences | Accounts
  2. Click on the account of interest
  3. Advanced tab
There you can pick any port, choose ssl or not, and select from a list of authentication methods.

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