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A possible solution for incorrect envelope printing System
A certain common printer configuration can cause improper rendering of envelopes from Address Book and Microsoft Word. I use an HP LaserJet 4L on a Linux CUPS server as a network printer, and my default config for this would not render envelopes with correct rotation; no matter what settings I tried in the various print dialogs, and no matter what other online tips I tried, the address information would print in portrait fashion instead of being correctly rotated 90 degrees (landscape) to correspond to a manually-fed envelope.

The good news is, I discovered the problem and corrected it. In summary, one must skip the CUPS printer driver and utilize one of your OS X printer drivers.

The wrong way to set up your printer is what I did first: to simply use the Default Browser in Printer Setup Utility to find my network printer. Because all other printing functions seemed to work just fine, it took me a while to realize that something might be amiss.

The correct way to set up your printer is to choose 'IP Printer' in Printer Setup Utility. Then complete the form as follows:
  • Protocol should be Internet Printing Protocol - IPP
  • Address should be your CUPS server hostname or IP.
  • Queue should be the string printers/ plus the CUPS queue name of your printer. Mine happens to be called Laser, so the Queue string for me is printers/Laser. You can remind yourself of the CUPS queue name by pointing your web browser at http://your.cups.server:631.
  • Name and Location are free-form entries.
  • Print Using corresponds to your printer make and model; in my case, it was HP LaserJet 4L - Gimp-Print v5.0.0-beta2.
Using these settings, my envelopes began printing correctly. I have the 'broken' driver and this correct driver installed, and I can alternate between the improper and correct printing behaviors simply by switching between the two.

Naturally, this may be simply my combination of CUPS, Linux, HP LaserJet, and OS X ... many of you may have no problems at all. I suspect, however, that there might be others out there whose native CUPS drivers are not printing correctly, and if so I encourage you to try the technique above to determine if the OS X printer driver solves your problems.
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A possible solution for incorrect envelope printing
Authored by: maczac on Jan 13, '06 10:10:00AM

I may be and idiot, but how does one get the Address...the cups server host name and IP ????

thanks


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zac



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A possible solution for incorrect envelope printing
Authored by: Anders Sandberg on Jan 13, '06 06:33:36PM

http://localhost:631/

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Anders S



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A possible solution for incorrect envelope printing
Authored by: Brian Purnell on Jan 15, '06 10:46:00PM

I'm afraid http://localhost:631/ doesn't tell you the Address (should be your CUPS server hostname or IP) or Queue (should be the string printers/ plus the CUPS queue name of your printer).

I'm afraid I don't know and can't seem to figure what these two are. If anyone knows how to get this info it would be appreciated.



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A possible solution for incorrect envelope printing
Authored by: cbpowell on Jan 16, '06 01:48:04PM

A 'CUPS server' is synonymous with 'network print server' in this context, and the address of it is most likely the IP address of the machine on your network that is physically attached to the printer with a parallel or USB cable. True, there are contexts where your CUPS server is not physically cabled to the printer, but this is the most likely scenario for many people. Put another way, it is the IP address of whatever machine is "sharing" the printer to others on the network.

Chances are, if you have a CUPS server on your network, you know it, and it is most assuredly not localhost. Your network administrator (if that isn't your role) will be able to give you the correct IP, and once you have that you can proceed with the rest of this hint.

If your printer is physically attached to your Mac, or your printer is attached to an AirPort Express, this hint does not really apply to you.



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