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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary System 10.4
Tiger only hintTyping "jobs" and "wozniak" in the Dictionary application or widget utility will bring up some obvious definitions of these words. You even get the correct pronunciation.

[robg adds: There seem to be a ton of names in the dictionary; gates works, too. So does Schiller, but it probably doesn't return the individual you might be thinking of. What's odd is the behavior of these alternative defintions. Say you have a sentence like this:

"The gates of the old mansion slowly creaked open."

If you control-click on gates and choose Look Up in Dictionary, you'll get Bill Gates' entry. The same thing happens with the word jobs in a sentence -- you'll see Steve's entry. The only way to get the "true" definitions of these words is to enter them in the search box of the Dictionary application directly. If you do that and wait, you'll see all the possible defintions. Even stranger, though, if you just type the word and hit Enter, you'll get the 'real' definition by default.]
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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary | 7 comments | Create New Account
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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary
Authored by: lsmft5178 on May 11, '05 02:01:41PM

This hint seems to imply that this behavior is a dictionary easteregg, but is in fact just a regular property of how dictionaries work. Look at it this way: 'jobs', 'gates' and 'bonds' are all words that will bring up individuals before they bring up 'real' definitions, where as 'dole' 'gore' and 'bush' will bring up 'real' definitions first. We could easily assume that this is a result of a wily Giants loving Apple employee with no interest in politics. I would point out that the real difference between these two sets has nothing to do with computers, baseball, or politics, but instead that the words in the first set are all plural. The dictionary pulls up Stevie's entry first because it has a separate entry for 'Jobs' but not one for the plural of 'job'.
To address Rob's point about using the application directly, the difference in behavior is because the applications entry field is case sensitive, and the contextual menu is not.
If anything it's happy accident. If you only look up words relating to computers in the Oxford English Dictionary, you'll think that you have a book about computers.



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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary
Authored by: kps on May 11, '05 02:15:45PM
If you only look up words relating to computers in the Oxford English Dictionary, you'll think that you have a book about computers.

According to my copy of the Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, Third Edition, Revised with Addenda:

Computer, one who computes, specifically one employed to make calculations in an observatory, etc.
I suppose that might have changed slightly in later editions.

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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary
Authored by: slytle on May 12, '05 02:36:16AM

Here's the really odd behavior:

There are entries for:

Windows |ˈwindōz| plural noun [treated as sing. ] trademark a computer operating system with a graphical user interface.

and

Linux |ˈlinəks| noun trademark an open-source version of the UNIX operating system.

but Apple and Macintosh return only:

apple |ˈapəl| noun 1 the round fruit of a tree of the rose family, which typically has thin red or green skin and crisp flesh. Many varieties have been developed as dessert or cooking fruit or for making cider. • [with adj. ] an unrelated fruit that resembles this in some way. See also custard apple, thorn apple . 2 (also apple tree) the tree bearing such fruit. • Genus Malus, family Rosaceae: numerous hybrids and cultivars. 3 ( the Apple) short for the Big Apple .

macintosh noun variant spelling of mackintosh . mackintosh |ˈmakənˌtä sh | (also macintosh) noun chiefly Brit. a full-length waterproof coat. • [usu. as adj. ] cloth waterproofed with rubber.

.sly



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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary
Authored by: da5idonimac on Jun 03, '05 08:11:18AM

highlight the word "blog" and look it up... :)



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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary
Authored by: macmath on Jun 03, '05 01:42:04PM

The same behavior occurs if you use the 'in-line' method of using the dictionary: Namely, highlight the word with a double-click of the mouse, and while the word is highlighted, hold down on the Control, Command, and 'D' keys. A small window will come up with a definition for the word. Moreover, the 'Thesaurus' option choosable from the same little window has no further options. However, selecting the 'More...' at the bottom of the little window does take you to the natural definitions of those words.

This is my favorite means of using the dictionary.



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10.4: View some interesting definitions in the Dictionary
Authored by: zarathustra on Oct 03, '05 02:06:56AM

Definitions vary by case. Jobs and jobs will return different results.



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case-sensitivity in Dictionary?
Authored by: sjk on Oct 03, '05 09:35:19PM

Are you're implying that a Dictionary app lookup of "Jobs" should be case-sensitive and return a proper name definition if it exists (e.g. Steve Jobs) but otherwise be case-insensitive? That's (arguably) the preferred behavior.



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