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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations Install
Just a quick heads-up ... I had organized my pre-installed Apple applications (Safari, Mail and iChat in a folder called Communications, etc.). When I installed Tiger using "Archive and Install," it did not replace the old apps with their new versions; instead, it put the new apps in the default location (Applications) and left my old apps behind. Launching from the Dock loaded the old versions, so I had to dig around and trash all the old apps.

So, just a warning: if you muck with your Applications folder, you might want to put everything back in place before installing Tiger.

[robg adds: This comes up with every major update (and some minor ones), it seems, so I figured it was worth repeating the caution. This is one reason why I've simply stopped trying to arrange the Apple-provided applications: I let them live where they want to live. Yes, there are ways around the issue using symbolic links, but I decided it wasn't worth the hassles. Every other program I own is installed on a separate Applications partition (barring a few recalcitrant subjects who refuse to run if they're not in /Applications), but I leave the Apple stuff alone.]
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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations | 16 comments | Create New Account
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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: escowles on May 06, '05 11:29:19AM

I have also stopped rearranging the /Applications folder. Instead, I have made my own set of folders for groups of apps (Media, Network, Utilities, etc.) in my home dir, and put aliases to applications in my folders. The folders are in my Dock, so when I install a new app, I usually just drag an alias to my dock folders, and then drag the original to /Applications.

So I use my folders in the Dock as my main application launcher, and only browse through /Applications in the Finder when I need something I don't normally use. This lets me keep the number of apps in the folders small, too, which helps the menus come up quickly and makes it easier to find the app I'm looking for.

-Esme



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: KJ on May 06, '05 12:04:03PM

Doesn't moving applications from the place they want to install result in the Software Update not seeing these applications (unless you do the symbolic link trick)? Or am i utterly wrong here?

---
KJ



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: qwerty denzel on Jun 14, '05 02:48:37AM

I thought that Software Update checks the reciepts folder for the current version, etc.



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: Thom on May 06, '05 12:08:01PM

I used to try and rearrange stuff, and I'd get really upset when doing system updates that Apple's programmers didn't spend the time to use one of the MANY methods at their disposal of finding the location of an app I might have moved...

Apple: "Well, we wrote it, and put it there in the first place."
Me: "Well, it's my system! And as an admin, I can move things around!"
Apple: "Enjoy your b0rk3n!" (er, okay, they wouldn't say that. But I digress.)

For a while I tried to deal with this by making aliases to the programs in other places, and making the original files invisible. But even this was a long and arduous process.

I was also really enjoying Keyboard Maestro's ability to launch any of a list of 'favorite apps' right from its command-tab program switcher. You'd hit a key (I think it was 'a') while cmd-tabbing, and boom, at the end of the list of currently open apps, the icons of any of your favorite apps (defined in KM's prefs) not already open would appear at the end of the list. If you picked one of them, it'd launch. (So good!)

I began to care a lot less about moving things around or launching from a list of 'favorite apps' because of programs like LaunchBar. My hands are on the keyboard most of the time, and being able to simply hit cmd-space, type a few letters from the name of my app, file, or whatever... just rocked.

More recently, and better, Quicksilver. It's free, it has more plugins, amazing amounts of support and ongoing development, more interface options... etc. Simply amazing software.

When I move to Tiger (soon...), Spotlight will provide yet another way of finding programs.

So, yeah... go ahead and put those apps wherever you want, Apple. I won't touch them anymore. ;)



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Applications folder in home
Authored by: juz10mac on May 06, '05 12:14:57PM

I used to use a folder called "More Applications" that I made myself on my hard drive. I put all non-Apple stuff that I installed myself, there. That worked quite well for a while, then I got some applications that wouldn't work unless they were in /Applications. Now I just stuff everything in my Applications folder (unless it looks like a utility, then it goes in my Utilities folder). I also made a folder for games inside Applications, but I don't have very many and that folder often gets forgotten. When I install Tiger (in just two more weeks, come my birthday) I will wipe everything, leave the apple stuff and stuff that I find completely necessary in my Applications folder and I will put everything else in my home folder's Application folder. That brings me to my point: The system considers a folder called "Applications" in your home folder to be a valid place to put applications. The idea is that if you don't own, or have admin access to the computer, you still have a place to install applications. I would also say that this is more of my stuff and not Apple stuff, so it belongs in my home folder. If you don't believe me, just put an "Applications" folder in your home folder and watch it take on the appearance of your Applications folder. The change will take effect the next time finder is reloaded (logging out then back in, for example).



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: ether on May 06, '05 01:03:28PM

But why (oh! why?!) won't Apple (or anyone else) put a list somewhere that tells me where all that stuff I moved should have been left, so that in my now-wiser and repentant state I can put it all back?

I've got things that should probably have been replaced by something with a slightly different name (how many different Airport utilities am I supposed to have?), and I have no idea where what I do have comes from.

My folders are organized logically, and no menu is longer than my PowerBook screen, but Apple wins (or would, if I could figure out what goes where. :-(



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: jacobolus on May 06, '05 01:13:51PM
For the most part everything works alright with my applications organized into subfolders, with a few exceptions:
  1. Pages and Keynote need to be in /Applications/iWork/ or else system update won't find them
  2. Dictionary.app needs to be in /Applications/ or else the command-control-D shortcut (and the context menu item) won't work.
But I still prefer to leave everything else organized, just moving the programs apple recreats to their desired locations every time i upgrade.

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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: rossr on May 06, '05 02:24:24PM

My method of dealing with applications in Mac OS X has enabled me to organize my apps and still have Apple apps update correctly. It worked great for the last two major upgrades to Mac OS X (Panther and Tiger).

All without overly-clever symbolic link hoop-jumping! :)

Basically, just accept the fact that Apple apps live in /Applications and /Utilites and go from there...

  1. I create a folder called zApps in /Applications and give it the same permissions as /Applications
  2. In zApps, I create categorized folders for 3rd party applications. For example: Authoring, Graphics, Internet, Fun, Tools (non-Apple utilities) etc.
  3. I make aliases of /Applications and /Utilities and put them into zApps - I re-name the aliases: Apple and Utilities
  4. I put zApps on my dock and in my sidebar for easy reference.
  5. When I install new programs, they go into the appropriate zApp folder (which is located in /Applications).
  6. All my apps are organized!

When I upgrade/update my system, all Apple apps are located in the appropriate place (because I do not categorize them - they live in Applications or Utilities), so all is good.

When accessing my apps from the dock or finder, I use zApps instead of /Applications since it gives me access to all my programs in a categorized way. The only minor annoyance (that is really not that big of a deal) is that I have to distinguish between Apple apps and third party apps. ("Safari - oh that's not in 'Internet' it's in 'Apple' cuz its an Apple app...")

I hope this helps! :)

By the way, I call it zApps so that it sorts to the bottom of the /Application folder...



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: szabesz on May 06, '05 05:39:55PM

:) I use "1app", so it is the firs folder in "as Columns" view, which is my favorite when navigating. I do not want to "hide" this folder...



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: n8gray on May 06, '05 05:53:06PM

I've been planning to do the same thing, but I'll probably put my directory at the top level: /Apps. Is there some reason not to?

I was thinking about trying to set up a folder action so that when I add an app to /Apps it automatically gets symlinked into /Applications, but I'm not 100% sure how folder actions work so I gave up on it.



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: bdog on May 06, '05 04:55:53PM

I've read all of the posts, and I still think my method is the best. It does require a lot of extra work when applying updates though, but I don't care.

First, I move all my apps to sub folders just to how I want it.
Here are the folders in my /Applications/ ; (those are the only things that are in the root of Applications)
Apple
Audio-Video
Classic
Emulation
Games
Hacks-Helpers
Network
Other
Utilities

(are there any other major categories of apps that I missed, besides X11 since I don't use that?)

And in the Apple folder there are these sub folders;
Utilities (Client)
Utilities (Server-X.2)
Utilities (Server-X.3)

Whenever I have to apply a 10.#.x update, I move EVERY apple app to /Applications/ and /Applications/Utilities/ . Then apply the update, and move'em all back! (back to /Applications/Apple/) Otherwise, for any other update, I ALWAYS check to see what files will be modified for that package, and only move the apps that need to be moved.

Oh, and in /Application/Utilities/ there are NO apple apps here, just 3rd party utilities.



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: bdog on May 06, '05 05:02:16PM

I know! I will write a script, when I have time, with a whole bunch of "mv" commands. Then I can just run my "Pre-Update" script before updating. Then have another script that moves it all back!



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: n8gray on May 06, '05 05:41:54PM

Folks, please report these issues as bugs to Apple or the appropriate software developer. There's no reason an app should have to live in /Applications. Launch Services can find apps wherever they live as long as you've launched them at least once.

This is one of my pet peeves with Apple. They tell you, "applications are just bundles that you can drag and drop anywhere," but their own software fails to work if it's not in just the right place.



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: neodidymos on May 06, '05 11:49:57PM

How about just harnessing the power of Tiger without having to create links/moving things around etc:
1. Let apple install where they want
2. On the application, do a "Get Info" and add a "Spotlight Comment" - say for Mail, you could add somethign like "group:Communication". Add the same tag to all applications belonging to the same group - say to Safari/iChat/Y!M etc.
3. Add a smart folder - call it "Communication" with "Spotlight Comment = group:Communication", "Kind = Application", and Location=Computer

I think you will get the same result.



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: lucite on May 07, '05 06:34:07PM

I've read all the other comments and even though I haven't installed Tiger yet, your idea seems like the best one to me. Very intelligent and clean: don't try to defeat system (or lack thereof), but work around it by harnessing another aspect of it. Very clever.

Now all that remains to be seen is if your solution works out well in practice. If someone would like to ocntribute a view on this, that would be great.



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OS X 10.4 install may miss non-standard app locations
Authored by: neodidymos on May 08, '05 05:11:24AM

Lucite- it works well.



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