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Paste equations into Calculator.app Apps
A friend asked me for help with a Chemistry equation involving the composition of a penny. Using some patience, I figured out what I think was the right equation. I wrote it out in a text editor, then opened up Calculator and then tried pasting it in. It worked like a charm:
(8.95 * 97.3) + (7.14 * 2.7)
I had no idea you could do this; pretty awesome.

[robg adds: This is a huge timesaver if you're working on a more complex problem, as you can just do so in any text editor, then paste in Calculator. You could also use the Terminal, as has been discussed here a couple of times.]
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Paste equations into Calculator.app | 19 comments | Create New Account
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do you know calcservice?
Authored by: nick on Jan 31, '05 10:30:00AM

calcservice - as wordservice this potw - is made by christian gruneberg and provides the ability to solve equations in every cocoa-textfield as a service.



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: Chris Biagini on Jan 31, '05 10:52:59AM

Cool hint, certainly, and you can also do calculations with the "Get Result of Applescript" service. Press command-* (command-shift-8).



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RPN snob
Authored by: Lectrick on Jan 31, '05 11:17:45AM

Or, you could learn how to use an RPN calculator and download one of those, which would allow you to solve any of these kinds of equations of any level of nested parentheses =)

---
In /dev/null, no one can hear you scream



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RPN snob
Authored by: dwinter on Jan 31, '05 01:46:31PM

There's no need for downloading a RPN calculator, Mac OS X already comes with a RPN calculator: dc.
All you have to do is to open Terminal.app and type dc.



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: DaveA on Jan 31, '05 11:35:06AM

Also works in the excellent (and still alive!) Graphing Calculator: http://www.pacifict.com/Home.html



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: PeterDie on Jan 31, '05 02:02:25PM

Always missed the Classic calculator function in OS X.
You could paste an equation followed by an = sign into calculator, the buttons would play it off for you like very swift ghostlike fingers touched them and the answer would be right there. Could knock the socks off any passing windows user.
Shame this animation is gone in OS X



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: BlakeyRat on Jan 31, '05 07:13:02PM
You could paste an equation followed by an = sign into calculator, the buttons would play it off for you like very swift ghostlike fingers touched them and the answer would be right there. Could knock the socks off any passing windows user.

Yes, I'm sure that would be pretty impressive... if the Windows calculator didn't also do the same thing. Oh wait, it does. It has since Windows 95. Any Windows user you impressed with this must be pretty stupid to not know how to work the calculator in their own OS.

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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: Arno on Feb 01, '05 11:20:33AM
The Calculator (in the Apple menu) did this too since the days of sytem 6 (at least) too... Actually, it was much more impressive since it actually typed the numbers on the calculator's keyboard!

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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: wartenberg on Jan 31, '05 02:11:02PM

You can also use Google - just paste the equation into the google search field and google will provide you with the result. Quite handy, as you usually have you browser open anyway.



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: merlyn on Jan 31, '05 03:21:23PM
There's also Calc inside GNU Emacs, included for free in your OSX distro. It's very powerful, rivalling Mathematica for its myriad of features:
  • Choice of algebraic or RPN (stack-based) entry of calculations.
  • Arbitrary precision integers and floating-point numbers.
  • Arithmetic on rational numbers, complex numbers (rectangular and polar), error forms with standard deviations, open and closed intervals, vectors and matrices, dates and times, infinities, sets, quantities with units, and algebraic formulas.
  • Mathematical operations such as logarithms and trigonometric functions.
  • Programmer's features (bitwise operations, non-decimal numbers).
  • Financial functions such as future value and internal rate of return.
  • Number theoretical features such as prime factorization and arithmetic modulo M for any M.
  • Algebraic manipulation features, including symbolic calculus.
  • Moving data to and from regular editing buffers.
  • "Embedded mode" for manipulating Calc formulas and data directly inside any editing buffer.
  • Graphics using GNUPLOT, a versatile (and free) plotting program.
  • Easy programming using keyboard macros, algebraic formulas, algebraic rewrite rules, or extended Emacs Lisp.


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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: maslofer on Jan 31, '05 08:54:45PM
I recommend a program called Longhand.

Has dynamically adjustable equations and is quite powerful.

longhand.pansophists.net

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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: ericasadun on Jan 31, '05 09:35:40PM
Interestingly enough, there's a secret calculator application hidden within Calculator.app. Hidden in the Calculator.app/Contents/MacOS folder is "CalcEngine".

% cd
% ln -s /Applications/Calculator.app/Contents/MacOS/CalcEngine calc
% ls
Applications    FamRecords      Pfurz           Trash           calc
Desktop         Hurz            Pictures        Work            doit
Developer       Library         Public          Work alias      iDVDWorks
Development     Movies          ResetServices   bin
Documents       Music           Sites           bochs
% ./calc
(259+32)
291
(8.95 * 97.3) + (7.14 * 2.7)
890.113
exp(5)
148.41315910258
tan(2*pi)
-2.449293598294706e-16


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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: aranor on Jan 31, '05 11:57:34PM

Why not make an alias instead? That way you don't clutter up your home directory with symlinks.

Also, if you want easy command-line calculation and you have DarwinPorts installed, try looking at the 'calc' port.



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: ericasadun on Feb 01, '05 02:27:46AM
Aranor: Why not make an alias instead? That way you don't clutter up your home directory with symlinks.

Because I'm a dinosaur.


Grandma. New Tricks. Suck eggs. #import<favorite_metaphor.h>

;)



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Expressions, not equations
Authored by: kenahoo on Jan 31, '05 11:47:12PM

I hate to be pedantic, but "(8.95 * 97.3) + (7.14 * 2.7)" is not an equation, it's a numeric expression. Equations have equals-signs in them. When I read the title of this hint, I thought it was going to be about pasting things like "42 + 10/x = x + 5" into the calculator, which I assume is beyond its capabilities (though perhaps the hidden Graphing Calculator within it can do something with it).

Neat trick with Calculator.app/Contents/MacOS/CalcEngine - now if it only had readline support so I could use the up-arrow to edit a previous calculation....

-Ken



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: aranor on Jan 31, '05 11:55:21PM

For really easy equations, why not download the Calculator plugin for Quicksilver? It offers both 'bc' and 'dc' as the engine (selectable in prefs). Just pop open quicksilver, hit =, type your equation, and hit enter.

Note that I am the author of this plugin, so this is a plug, but since it's freeware, I'm plugging it because I honestly think it's the easiest way to do simple calculations. Also, Quicksilver rocks.



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: zzzmarcus on Feb 01, '05 09:24:54AM
I'm a fan of the magic number machine.

It's all but replaced calc.app for me.

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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: smittie on Feb 04, '05 05:13:01PM

So, no one has mentioned that if you open the paper tape (View -> Show Paper Tape) in Calc.app you can type the numeric expression (but not equations) directly into Calc.app. Or you can paste the expression from another app and then use the paper tape to play with the expression. This makes Calc.app similar to but not as robust as Long Hand.

Smittie



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Paste equations into Calculator.app
Authored by: smittie on Feb 04, '05 05:16:29PM

One point to add, Calc.app is pretty picky about where you put the equals sign. You either need to leave it off or put it on a separate line. Calc.app isn't smart enough to handle the equal sign on the same line as the rest of the expression.

Smittie



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