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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application UNIX
Instead of using a GUI application, such as ZTerm, to connect to the serial interface, you can use the command line tool minicom. This has the big advantage that it can be used when connected to the computer via SSH.

You can download minicom via Fink, or compile it from the source. I used minicom-2.1, which can be found on here to compile it on Mac OS X 10.3. In the Terminal, after downloading and decompressing, do:
  1. sudo mkdir /var/lock
  2. ./configure --enable-dfl-port=/dev/tty.modem ... or another tty
  3. make
  4. sudo make install
  5. sudo minicom -s
You can use minicom on a Mac OS X Server setup, too, but you'll have to use /dev/tty.serial as a configuration parameter. It also works fine with the KEYSPAN Adapter USB to Serial cable (/dev/tty.USA28X2b23P1.1 on my machine).
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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: clueless on Oct 28, '04 03:54:07PM

Won't build in 10.2.8 - which is too bad because the fink version has trouble with my eMac's modem. Always takes a couple tries before it can talk to the modem. Then it works flawlessly.

Anybody else seen this behaviour? I've been living with it for a year or so now.



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: gshenaut on Oct 28, '04 04:41:34PM
I have always found Kermit to be a reliable way to talk to serial interfaces. I installed from darwinports, but I think fink has it too.

Greg Shenaut

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minicom security vulnerabilities to boot
Authored by: mzs on Oct 28, '04 05:31:01PM

In the past minicom haws had numerous security vulnerabilities, so if past experience is any indication I would continue to use Kermit. Besides kermit has a ton of very powerful features. (Like you can use kermit between a HP48 calculator.)



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: osxpounder on Oct 28, '04 08:16:21PM

I'm curious: what are serial interfaces? What's an example or two of the things you are talking about?

I'm curious, but I imagine this might be useful if it's what I think it is. A coworker manages a digital closed-circuit television system that has something to do with RS-232, I hear.

---
--
osxpounder



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: gshenaut on Oct 29, '04 01:27:13AM
A somewhat windows-centric introduction is found here.

Greg Shenaut

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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: dkwyman on Oct 29, '04 09:49:25AM

The open source "screen" command is pre-installed in the Mac OS X.
Solaris users will recall the "tip" command. I use "screen" and a
USB-serial adapter when I need quick-and-dirty terminal emulation
via a serial port.
===========================================
screen man page:

screen -r [[pid.]tty[.host]]
screen -r sessionowner/[[pid.]tty[.host]]

DESCRIPTION
Screen is a full-screen window manager that multiplexes a
physical terminal between several processes (typically
interactive shells). Each virtual terminal provides the
functions of a DEC VT100 terminal and, in addition, sev-
eral control functions from the ISO 6492 (ECMA 48, ANSI
X3.64) and ISO 2022 standards (e.g. insert/delete line and
support for multiple character sets). There is a scroll-
back history buffer for each virtual terminal and a copy-
and-paste mechanism that allows moving text regions
between windows.
clip



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: clueless on Oct 29, '04 10:05:50AM

No tip in Jaguar



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BSD tip builds and runs
Authored by: SlewSys on Oct 29, '04 09:17:43PM

For the curious - the FreeBSD tip(1) source builds and runs on MacOSX as is - just remove the FreeBSD macros `__FBSDID($FREEBSD$);' and use bsdmake(1). To attach to the modem, use `cu -l /dev/tty.modem'.



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BSD tip builds and runs
Authored by: rgunzip on Oct 31, '04 09:14:48PM

I would absolutely love to recover my old cu utility, but I searched through the FreeBSD ports database and they don't have a specific "tip" port. Could you give us more details on how to get tip or cu to work on OSX (where to find the source, what to change in the code to get it to compile it, ect...).

I did try to compile UUCP a while back but I was never able to squeeze a binary out of the source code.

Thanks for the "TIP"

CU

;-)



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: dkwyman on Nov 03, '04 12:33:29PM

I should not have alluded to "tip" in Solaris... it confused folks.

The command that's pre-installed in Jaguar/Panther is "screen"
(refer to the "screen" man pages via the terminal).

I'll leave comments about "cu" to someone else.



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: jce on Oct 29, '04 12:40:19PM

Could you please give the exact syntax of the screen-command you use to connect to tty.modem and to your USB-Serial-Adapter.

---
Jean-Claude Eischen
Swiss Federal Institute of Technology
Zurich - Switzerland



[ Reply to This | # ]
Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: malfunction54 on Nov 05, '04 12:33:34AM

Thank you!!! I've been trying to figure out how to get tip/cu finctionality out of OSX. I was using zterm, but it crashes hard, and I can't kill it, even with a "kill -9" I have a soekris Net4801 that I would like to connect to via a IOGear USB-Serial adapter. This did the trick!

FYI, the command was:

screen /dev/tty.usbserial (depends on the device your driver creates)

-Andy



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Use minicom as a serial-interface terminal application
Authored by: Thom on Nov 19, '04 09:58:11PM

I just compiled minicom on an XServe. Here are a few things to be aware of re: the serial port.

1) Just like any cisco router or HP switch, etc, the XServe is configured to listen with a secure terminal on the serial port, for config purposes. Disable this before trying to use the serial port for other purposes.

You might *think* of editing /etc/ttys, but you actually want to edit /System/Library/StartupItems/SerialTerminalSupport/SerialTerminalSupport -- and edit the line halfway through to say,

ENABLE_SERIAL_TERMINAL=$FALSE

Once this is done, it's easiest to just reboot the machine.

2) As mentioned above, the serial port is /dev/tty.serial. Here are some of the defaults I compiled into the program:

./configure --enable-dfl-port=/dev/tty.serial --enable-lock-dir=/var/spool/lock --enable-dfl-baud=9600

(of course, that's because my application is to talk to a device at 9600N81, YMMV.)

3) Notice the lock dir mentioned above. There is no /usr/spool/uucp, or /var/lock, as mentioned in the man page. That's why I compiled it with /var/spool/lock instead. I also ended up modifying the permissions on the lock directory, but there's probably a better way to do that. Again, just FWIW.

Hope this is helpful to someone.



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