Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!

View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo Apps
Yeah, I know, another pointless 'slow motion by using the shift key' hint -- so I'll try and keep it short.

Open the iTunes Music Store in iTunes. In any of the horizontal album-cover sections (New releases, Exclusives, Pre-Releases, Just Added, Staff Favorites), hold shift and click the blue arrow at either end of the panel.

Ooh aah.

[robg adds: You're right, there's no practical reason at all for viewing sliding album covers in slow-mo ... but macosxhints exists to document these little nuggets, so consider it documented!]
    •    
  • Currently 1.00 / 5
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
  (2 votes cast)
 
[7,029 views]  

View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo | 4 comments | Create New Account
Click here to return to the 'View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo
Authored by: AntAllan on Jul 02, '04 12:25:46PM

This works in Windows iTunes too -- sorry, but I have to use Windows for work -- so it's not so much a Mac OS X Hint as an iTunes Hint.



[ Reply to This | # ]
View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo
Authored by: tidjj on Jul 03, '04 09:30:55AM

Funny.
Try this: the genius (click orange minimizing button) is slightly different between iTunes and other apps. Slow it down using shift key too.



[ Reply to This | # ]
View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo
Authored by: johnq on Jul 03, '04 08:59:45PM

It's quite telling that Jobs would want a key command to slow things down so we can ooh and ahh over special effects, rather than making key commands to speed things up. :D Quite the showman. ;)



[ Reply to This | # ]
View iTunes Music Store panel animation in slow-mo
Authored by: osxpounder on Jul 06, '04 06:08:14PM

Ok, ok, leave it to me to find a good excuse for this slow-mo thing. Here's one: users who suffer from visual agnosia may benefit from having things change a little more slowly than the rest of us can tolerate. I only just learned about that disorder today, though, so I'm just, um, what do they call it, reaching for straws?

Since usability testing supports the idea that slower transitions are easier to recognize, there's another possible angle. Perhaps Apple had earlier planned to offer a checkbox preference for Finder specifying "slow transitions" for that reason, and the last vestige of it is the SHIFT-click .... ?

---
--
osxpounder



[ Reply to This | # ]