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Create custom OS X keyboard layouts online System
There's a great web-based program on Wordherd.com called Unicode Keyboards for Mac OS. You can use it to create customized OS X keyboard layout files, and it includes good documentation on how to make it all work. All credits to Wordherd!

I've used it to make keyboard symbol characters (jpg example) from Lucida Grande available through keyboard shortcuts. When writing a software manual, you can then use the "real" keyboard symbols (like the Command "clover"), instead of writing "Command-C." The Lucida Grande font has all those symbols; they're just not easily available (though Character Palette will do for occasional use). As a small example of how to do this, use these rules:
OSl $21ea.  :: CapsLock
OSs $21e7.  :: Shift
OSc $2303.  :: Control
OSo $2325.  :: Option
OSa $2318.  :: Command
in the Unicode Keyboards for Mac OS program to generate a keyboard layout file, and install it according to the instructions.

In Lucida Grande, Option-Shift-L will then produce the CapsLock symbol, Option-Shift-A will produce the Command "clover" symbol, etc. Use the Character Palette with mouseovers to find out which Unicode number represents which symbol. For instance, in this screenshot, the clover symbol is Unicode 2318.

[robg adds: I haven't tried this one yet...]
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Try Ukelele instead
Authored by: Uncle Asad on May 20, '04 02:32:20AM
Having tried a number of these keyboard layout generators (the online Wordherd.com utility before it had useable instructions, several versions of Keyboard Builder and Ukelele) while trying to recreate a custom layout I'd made back in the days of System 7, Ukelele remains my favorite. It has a nice GUI and just works--no special "coding" required!

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