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Restart quickly via fast user switching System
I set my wife up with a separate user account and Fast User Switching so she could use Mail and Safari. I mistakenly rebooted from her account after adding a new screensaver. At the time, she had about four apps booted, while on my side, I had over 35. But the thing went into reboot as though my account didn't exist at all -- 30 seconds is all it took, compared to up to five minutes from my side. It dawned on me that anyone could create a basic user for just such a use. Some dock icons were moved around, but rebooting again after setting things back resulted in no changes.

[robg adds: I haven't tested this one...]
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Restart quickly via fast user switching | 12 comments | Create New Account
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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: rufo on Mar 12, '04 11:37:09AM

I'm not sure what exactly he means by this... If you try to shut down or restart the computer while two users are logged in, a dialog comes up asking for an administrator's username and password, informing you that by continuing all other users will lose unsaved changes. My understanding (and perhaps I'm wrong here) is that OS X will basically just kill every process belonging to that user without giving it a chance to clean up after itself. While most programs should deal with this OK, I'm still reluctant to come anywhere near endorsing that as a good thing to be doing on a semi-regular basis. Besides the obvious problem of losing all your unsaved documents, programs leave temp files around, preferences might not be saved, a program could be killed in the middle of writing important data to disk and in the process corrupt a data file. I'm not saying any of this will happen, but it still seems like a poor thing to be doing unless absolutely necessary.

If the poster means something else by it... then all bets are off and everybody can just ignore me. ;)



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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: schneb on Mar 12, '04 12:20:48PM

Sounds to me like it just restarted the login partition and not the core system.



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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: Kriek on Mar 12, '04 12:45:40PM

This is not true, I have 3 user accounts set-up, 2 of them are admin accounts, one is a regular user. Whenever you try to reboot in either one account you have to supply an admin username + password.



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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: Saint on Mar 12, '04 01:34:23PM

here's my question:
why did you restart after installing a screen saver?
if it was somescreensaver.saver, I'm pretty damn sure nothing would tell you to restart, cause there is no need to restart.
was it some sort of bastard/stupid independently installed screensaver that doesn't run thru system prefs?



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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: PaulB on Mar 13, '04 01:00:16AM

READ! He said: "I mistakenly rebooted from her account after adding a new screensaver."
So: he acknowledges that is was a mistake to do in the first place, but doing something mistakenly, he thought he discovered something new and is sharing that with the rest of the world!



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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: johnq on Mar 15, '04 06:20:05AM
---
READ! He said: "I mistakenly rebooted from her account after adding a new screensaver."
So: he acknowledges that is was a mistake to do in the first place, but doing something mistakenly, he thought he discovered something new and is sharing that with the rest of the world!

---
He doesn't "acknowledge it was a mistake to do in the first place". He seems to be saying that the mistake part was not that he rebooted, but that he "rebooted from her account".

For all we know he still thinks you need to reboot anytime you add screensavers.

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Bad/Misleading hint.
Authored by: evands on Mar 12, '04 02:09:56PM

Equally true: Pressing and holding the power button on your mac for 3 to 5 seconds will immediately turn it off without the tedious process of shutting it down.

Rebooting in this manner does not give applications run by the background user any notification that the system is shutting down. This may result in loss of data, will definitely not give you a chance to save changes, and so on.



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force-quit loginwindow process!!
Authored by: cparnot on Mar 12, '04 03:24:58PM

If you want to log out fast, that's the way to go: kill loginwindow in Activity Monitor... no need to switch user.

This is basically what you are doing here, and this is usually not a good idea.

---
charles



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Restart quickly via fast user switching
Authored by: Teshel on Mar 12, '04 04:07:35PM
You can do the same thing by opening a terminal session (/Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app) and typing:
          sudo reboot now
Then enter your password. This will -- as others have pointed out -- simply terminate any open applications. It is a very fast way to reboot, though.

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No "now" switch for reboot
Authored by: gatorparrots on Mar 14, '04 03:08:07AM
I think you are getting reboot confused with the shutdown utility:
shutdown -r now
For the reboot utility, it is simply:
sudo reboot
(no now switch is necessary)

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reboot vs shutdown -r now
Authored by: TigerKR on Mar 13, '04 10:19:43AM

I used to think that the preferred command for instant restarting from the command line was "shutdown -r now" as opposed to "reboot". But for the searching I have patience for right now, the omnigoogle says that the two commands are functionally equivalent.

I guess that will save some keystrokes for me in my remote administration capacities.



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reboot vs shutdown -r now
Authored by: PygmySurfer on Mar 14, '04 08:06:27AM

If the OS X man pages are correct, shutdown -r and reboot are definitely NOT equivalent. The reboot command seems to just flush the filesystem cache, send first a SIGTERM and then a SIGKILL to all processes, and reboot.

Shutdown warns users, sends a SIGTERM to the 'init' process to bring the system to Single-User mode, and then calls reboot.

Be careful not to confuse the OS X (and Solaris, and probably other UNIX-like OSes) reboot command with the Linux reboot command. On Linux, reboot calls shutdown, thus switching to the proper run-level, executing the shutdown scripts, etc. Looks like Linux implemented it backwards. :)



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