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10.3: Manually receive an incoming fax System
When your phone rings and you realised you're receiving a fax and not a phone call, run to your computer, and type in the Terminal sudo fax receive. After you've typed your password, your computer will start receiving the fax.

It will be placed in your home folder and have a name such as 1214190520.001. Rename this to anything ending in .fax, double-click on it, and you're done!

IMPORTANT NOTE: for this to work, you must NOT have enabled fax receiving in your pref pane!
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10.3: Manually receive an incoming fax
Authored by: macubergeek on Jan 02, '04 03:43:31PM

you can also send a fax by doing
sudo fax send <areacode +phone number> filename.txt
as in
sudo fax send 3011234567 filename.txt
be sure to put a 1 in front of phone number it's long distance.



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10.3: Manually receive an incoming fax
Authored by: jiclark on Jan 03, '04 11:33:00PM

Question: do you get any sort of feedback when using these Terminal commands? For instance, can you hear the fax 'handshake' being negotiated in both receive and send circumstances? Or is there maybe an -v equivalent of some sort?

Thx, John-o



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10.3: Manually receive an incoming fax
Authored by: cane on Mar 01, '04 03:31:04PM
sudo fax receive -v
should enter verbose mode. i've never used this, so i have no clue what it spits out. just type "man fax" to get a short documentation of the fax command

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10.3: Manually receive an incoming fax
Authored by: jmontana on Jun 13, '05 11:25:34PM

Replying to this very late, but I just stumbled on this hint, and it actually works in Tiger. One thing: the document will not always be in your home folder. It will end up in whatever folder you were in when you issued the command.

So:

[localhost:~] % sudo fax receive

Will create a file in your home folder. But:

[localhost:~/Desktop] % sudo fax receive

Will create a file on your desktop. And actually, I ended up with four files:

0613224013.001
0613224013.002
0613224013.003
0613224013.004

I renamed the .004 and opened it with Preview. Worked perfectly.



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