Submit Hint Search The Forums LinksStatsPollsHeadlinesRSS
14,000 hints and counting!

10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther Apps
You can get Palm Desktop to work in Panther by logging in as root and doing a fresh install. Make sure you have the the latest iSync Palm conduit installed too, and iSync will work with your Palm. This hint came from the Palm Brighthand Forums.

[robg adds: I had no problems with Palm HotSync via Bluetooth on my PowerBook, but I know others have had issues...]
    •    
  • Currently 2.57 / 5
  You rated: 2 / 5 (7 votes cast)
 
[30,734 views]  

10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther | 39 comments | Create New Account
Click here to return to the '10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther' hint
The following comments are owned by whoever posted them. This site is not responsible for what they say.
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: jkramlich on Nov 02, '03 10:52:34PM

What's the potential for damaging your system by installing Palm Desktop as the root user? Am I just too paranoid or is there merit to my question?

Being able to reliably hotsync my Zire71 has been the only reason I haven't upgraded all of my machines to Panther.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: Shawn Parr on Nov 02, '03 11:52:18PM

Well, first off, there have been some reports of people not needing to log in as root, as Rob mentioned in his comment.

That being said, the most damage that can be done is to any files the Palm Desktop installer would want to modify. Theoretically it should only be adding/overwriting its own files.

In practice no one has complained about this hosing their systems. Although one user has commented that after logging in as root, upon logging out the root user was automatically disabled.

And yes, I am the same Shawn Parr that appears often on the Brighthand forums. :)



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: petruk on Nov 03, '03 02:08:45AM

Wow, many thanks for that! It made my clean install of Documents To Go finally work (by logging in as root) although my clean install of Palm Desktop (in Admin account) always worked fine for me.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: Robert Hancock on Nov 03, '03 07:13:33AM

Sorry to say this but logging in as root and trying to install Palm Desktop 4.1 still does not work for me. I get a message saying that the install was not completed and to retry or quit. This is on a clean Panther install with fixed permissions. Surely Palm had a developer preview and knew this bug was going to bite and still no sign of a fix from them either!
Some people seem able to get it to install while others can't--I wonder what the important variable is?
JFTR, Panther also fsked ViaVoice and my Epson MJ930C printer using CUPS.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: foobar104 on Nov 03, '03 09:35:02AM

I'm continually amazed by how many alleged tips or hints include the phrase "log in as root."

Thou shalt not log in as root. Period. It's the highest of all the Mac OS X commandments. There is nothing you could possibly need or want to do that requires root access, but by logging in with that level of privilege you can do great harm to yourself.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: Eravau on Nov 03, '03 12:25:22PM
Before OS X every Mac user had the equivalent of root access to their computers. And yet somehow...their computers didn't explode on a dialy basis. Why are some of you so paranoidly frightened of root?

No, you probably don't need to be logged in as root very often, but saying "You should never log on as root." as if it's the end of the world is just plain silly.

[ Reply to This | # ]

10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: babbage on Nov 03, '03 02:19:41PM

Sorry, no, foobar is right -- the burden of proof is on those who would advocate using the root account to justify why this makes any sense -- EVER.

Comparing OSX to OS9 is a straw man. OSX is not OS9. It is not a classical Mac system. It is BSD, it inherits from a 30 year old Unix heritage, and it inherits a clean, well designed bundle of security mechanisms, one of which is that non-priviliged users are deliberately prohibited from doing certain things.

Working as the root user COMPLETELY CIRCUMVENTS 30 YEARS OF ACCUMULATED WISDOM FOR HOW BEST TO WORK ON A UNIX SYSTEM. There MAY, under SOME extreme circumstances, be a good justification for doing this, but honestly such situations are best left to sysadmins and the tech staff at your local repair shop. For everything else, the sudo command is almost ALWAYS a better alternative.

There's a good reason why your car has a sturdy metal casing around the engine, with a firewall between the engine and the passenger compartment and a hood & fenders encasing the rest of the engine chamber. Sometimes it makes sense to reach in there and work on something: popping the hood, doing the repair, and then closing it again is roughly equivalent to using sudo access. On the other hand, working as root is more like dismantling that firewall and throwing the hood away, because you're so 'leet and you want to be able to reach into the engine at any time, because hey it wasn't much harder to get into the Model T's engine, so why should it be "protected" today. This is a really silly point of view, and a terrible habit to get into.

I really, really, really wish this site would stop publishing hints that advocated doing things as root. It's very irresponsible.

---
--
DO NOT LEAVE IT IS NOT REAL



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: robg on Nov 03, '03 03:06:37PM
I am a firm believer in the tennant that everyone is a master of their own machine. If a certain fix seems to work when logging in as root, then I'm going to publish it. Notice that I did not explain how to login as root, how to enable the root password, or any of that other stuff. If one has figured that out for themselves already (yes, it's all documented here), then they're perfectly capable of deciding whether they want to risk a root login to fix their problem or not.

Logging in as root isn't good. And with apps like Pseudo, it may not even be required. But my job here is to try to document ways of doing stuff in OS X, and this particular example denotes a solution that requires logging in as root. So I chose to publish it, and I think I will always make such decisions. Maybe I'll just start adding an obligatory root tag line: "Logging in as root can be dangerous and many people claim it's never necessary. Procced at your own risk, assuming you've already figured out how to enable root."

-rob.

[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: foobar104 on Nov 04, '03 10:00:33AM
If a certain fix seems to work when logging in as root, then I'm going to publish it.

That's not the greatest selection criteria in the world, I think. The question ought to be not whether a given root-related hint works or not. It should be whether it's necessary or not. Because as soon as you tell somebody to enable the root account on his computer, you're giving him the gun and the bullets. When you tell him to log in as root, you're pointing the gun at his foot and putting his finger on the trigger. One wrong twitch and it's all over.

Hints involving logging in as the root user should, in my unsolicited opinion, only be published when there is no other option. And I, personally, have never encountered a situation where there was no other option but to log in as root. Especially in this case; I installed Panther, then Palm Desktop (from the Palm website; whichever version is currently available), then the Palm iSync conduit, and had absolutely no problems. It works perfectly. So it's obvious that root access is not required.

[ Reply to This | # ]

10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: danelgran on Nov 04, '03 12:04:53PM

Hey!

Its my Mac!!! If I want to log in as root....thats MY problem. If I break my Mac, its my fault. Nobody's twisting my arm to actually use the hint.

Bottom line -- I'd rather know about the hint than not....its up to me if Im gonna use it.





[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: huzzam on Nov 06, '03 06:13:18PM
Hints involving logging in as the root user should, in my unsolicited opinion, only be published when there is no other option. And I, personally, have never encountered a situation where there was no other option but to log in as root. Especially in this case; I installed Panther, then Palm Desktop (from the Palm website; whichever version is currently available), then the Palm iSync conduit, and had absolutely no problems. It works perfectly. So it's obvious that root access is not required.

For you. I installed Panther (clean install), downloaded the Palm installer, and it won't install, complaining that "access was denied" (how War Games!). Sounds a lot like a permissions problem to me. Just because you didn't have a problem doesn't mean that no one is having it. And probably until Palm fixes their installer, the only way I'll be able to install is by installing as root.

Besides, there's no security difference between logging in as root to install something, and typing in your administrator password when an installer asks for it. Both mechanisms grant the installer root-level access. Do you never type your administrator password?



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: babbage on Nov 04, '03 12:28:21PM
I am a firm believer in the tennant that everyone is a master of their own machine.

Sure, I'm not arguing against that. But just because it's possible to turn off the safety net that a disabled root account gives you doesn't mean it's wise to do so, even if you're a very competent admin of your own machine. The account is disabled as a safety mechanism -- protecting you from yourself, protecting you from malicious intruders, and protecting the world from misconfigured systems. Sometimes, things you want to do require escalated priviliges, but circumventing the protections on root is not the responsible way to acquire those priviliges. Think of the root account like a lockbox or safe -- the box and its contents are yours, but that doesn't mean it makes sense to leave it open all the time.

If a certain fix seems to work when logging in as root, then I'm going to publish it.

And that is what seems irresponsible to me. In every case I've read where a tip on this site tells the user to log in as root, it's almost always safer, easier, and even faster to do the same thing with sudo or Pseudo.

I'm not saying not to publish the hints -- they're a great resource! But I am saying that, as a responsible editor, the responsible thing to do would be to edit them. If the hint submitter suggests using root without justifying it, consider having the submitter rewrite the hint using sudo or Pseudo. If the submitter can't or won't make the change, consider doing it yourself. But please, please please don't run sloppy advice like this -- it dilutes the quality of the site for those who have been burned by such advice in the past.

Notice that I did not explain how to login as root, how to enable the root password, or any of that other stuff. If one has figured that out for themselves already (yes, it's all documented here), then they're perfectly capable of deciding whether they want to risk a root login to fix their problem or not.

This is where I disagree most strenuously. Advice about how to enable the root account gets passed around so much out of what seems to be nothing more than ignorance about better, safer ways to do things. Just because someone figured out how to turn on root does not mean they know what they're doing -- chances aren't bad that they're just cargo culting a bad habit they picked up from some HOWTO site that also didn't know any better.

I know how to pop my car's hood. I do not know how to change the transmission. That doesn't mean that I couldn't learn, or that I might not have a good reason to have to try it some day, but just because I might, someday need to be able to rebuild my transmission does not mean that it makes any sense for me to leave the hood off all the time just in case I feel like poking around at some future date.

For that matter, it seems like skilled mechanics also leave their cars' hoods closed most of the time. Curious, eh?

Logging in as root isn't good. And with apps like Pseudo, it may not even be required. But my job here is to try to document ways of doing stuff in OS X, and this particular example denotes a solution that requires logging in as root.

But that's the thing -- did the essential quality of this hint depend on the user turning off the safety check of the disabled root account, or was there some safer way to do this? Clearly, there were other, better, ways to do it. Running bad advice can be almost as bad as running no advice at all.

Maybe I'll just start adding an obligatory root tag line: "Logging in as root can be dangerous and many people claim it's never necessary. Procced at your own risk, assuming you've already figured out how to enable root."

That would be a fair start, but as I say above, an even better approach would be to actively discourage hint submitters from advocating such behavior. Like I say, almost every hint I've seen that suggested using root could easily be rewritten in such a way that the same task can be accomplished without putting the user's system security at such risk.

Like I said in my earlier post, the burden of proof should be on anyone advocating such unrestricted use of the root account. Such legit uses may exist, but I can't think of any, and I've been a sysadmin for a while now. With such easy & safe options as sudo and Pseudo, I have a hard time seeing why people keep advocating the much riskier, much more archaic alternative of an unrestricted root account.

----

My I wrote a lot, didn't I? Well I hope this comes across as constructive, and not just pedantic -- I really do think that the site would be a stronger resource if this kind of irresponsible advice didn't keep getting casually tossed around, and I hope you see how easy it could be to clean up the situation a bit. Please consider it -- thanks.

---
--
DO NOT LEAVE IT IS NOT REAL


[ Reply to This | # ]

10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: robg on Nov 04, '03 08:21:39PM

Constructive tone noted and understood (and after three years, I've learned to take nothing personally! :-). Given the realities of time management and hint submissions, getting authors to re-write their submissions, and explaining why, is simply not feasible. Similarly, I dislike changing what others have written (beyond correcting grammar, spelling, and formatting), so I'm not inclined to change it myself.

However, I agree in principle with your some of your statements on root, so I will do my best to remember to add a root disclaimer whenever such a hint is published (they are few and far between -- if I'm remembering correctly, there might be 10 or 20 in the database overall). Perhaps I'll even make it a hint in and of itself, and then I'll just link it in the disclaimer: "See this hint for a way of doing this without physically logging in as root" or somesuch.

-rob.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: daggerquill on Nov 04, '03 10:27:22AM

This is a myth, and a limiting and potentially dangerous one at that. There are no inherent problems with logging in as root in terms of system stability or security. The practice of not logging in as root developed as a way to protect systems with multiple administrators: the dangers are that someone will forget that they are logged in as root and accidentally do some damage, or that in an environment where the system is being constantly customized and extended that some program run from root will have unexpected consequences--probably due to a bad relative path--and hose the system. root functionality, however, is vital to system administration. And I don't mean just giving programs an administrator password to install software, I mean really going in once in a while and poking around to make sure everything looks right. On traditional UNIX systems, sudo and su provide this functionality for administrators, but permissions in Aqua don't work in traditional ways, so for a normal user to effectively administer and secure his/her system, he/she needs to occasionally log in as root. And if it is a simple way to handle or avoid permissions issues, why not? It's really no different that using sudo to launch a graphical installer in other Unices, expcept that OS X doesn't really allow users to run programs as other users effectively in the Finder.

As long as useres understand that they shouldn't be using it as a normal account to check mail, read macosxhints, etc., it is a useful and necessary tool. Would I prefer that there be other other ways of doing things? Sure, and PSuedo may be part of that way, but only part. Until Apple truly incorporates that functionality as part of the system itself, people are going to need to use the root account if the are unwilling or unable to learn the cli. OS X isn't UNIX. It's not BSD; it's BSD-based, and some of the old truisms just don't apply.

---
Always remember: pillage *before* you burn



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: foobar104 on Nov 04, '03 03:05:52PM

I consider myself to be a knowledgeable UNIX system administrator. I've been doing it for over a decade now, and I've seen a lot of things. I can find my way around in the dark, as it were.

I never, ever, EVER log in as root. Why? Because one time, just one time, I screwed myself.

I had a tar file in my home directory. I un-tarred it only to find that the resulting directory and all the files in it were owned by somebody else. No problem, I thought to myself. I'll just change the ownership on the directory.

I changed directories into the directory in question:

% cd foo

I became the superuser.

% su
Password:

I recursively changed ownership of the directory.

# chown -R me.mygroup .

At least, that's what I meant to do. Have you ever noticed that the dot and the slash are right next to each other on the QWERTY keyboard? That's right, kiddies, I typed, as root, the following magical incantation:

# chown -R me.mygroup /

The computer dutifully obeyed--I was root, after all, so it was assumed that I knew what I was doing. It started at the top of the filesystem and began changing the ownership of all the files on the computer. One by one. In alphabetical order, depth first.

It had already made it all the way through /bin by the time I slammed the interrupt key.

That was the day I learned that the computer I was using couldn't boot, not even into single-user mode, if the Bourne shell executive wasn't owned by root. Because /bin/sh was owned by me, not by root, I couldn't do ANYTHING. I couldn't even run any shell commands because the computer was unable to fork due to the permissions problem.

The only solution was to reinstall my OS.

All because of a typo.

Tell me again how, "There are no inherent problems with logging in as root in terms of system stability or security."



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: huzzam on Nov 06, '03 06:40:38PM

The exact same thing would have happened if you had typed:

$ sudo chown -R me.mygroup /

which is what the "anti-root faction" ;) is advocating. The fact is that you wanted to change the ownership of a directory tree owned by root. The only way to do that is by somehow getting root-level access, whether through logging in as root, su'ing to root, or using sudo. They all carry exactly the same risk.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: JayBee on Nov 07, '03 11:29:01PM

True-ish, but there's always the handy "please enter your password" breaker to let you think and go "uh-oh" ;)



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Using Root to make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: gdouglas on Nov 04, '03 07:29:23PM

Personally I have never had to log in as root. Of course, I haven't upgraded to Panther yet either, and I am holding off until other good folks have blazed a path for me that is completely "root free".

However it is interesting to me that Apple specifically refers to logging in as root to manually back up all users in their article at
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106941

Also Apple recently posted this article on enabling root in Panther and, per the article, has included those instructions in the Panther help file:
http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=125136

I would love to know what Apple thinks of using root to force installations.

Although I am resisting it, I guess eventually all us Mac-using people are all going to wind up knowing our way around Unix. And we will probably learn to tiptoe very carefully over any "roots" in our path.

---
G. Douglas



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: sjah on Mar 10, '04 03:44:34PM

Thou shalt not log in as root?

Is Apple infallible? Must we never go under the hood? Must we not tinker? Must we be satisfied with what we are given and never push boundaries?

I think you must have a pretty boring spread if you never log in as root.

It it one of the joys of OSX

If anyone doesn't knolw how to log in as root here's a brief trip:

open a terminal (Applications>utilities>terminal) and

type: sudo passwd root

enter your password,

Upon the "changing password for root" prompt
enter a new password for root. (don't loose it and make sure it's a good one)

when you're done if you change your login options to ask for a username and password you can enter root, the password and log in with no permission restrictions.

WARNING: Make sure you back up often and try to know what you're doing before you experiment. This is a power tool.

enjoy freedom from permissions.

_sjah



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: jeffbyrnes on Nov 03, '03 10:02:19AM

There's a better way to install Palm Desktop than logging in as root. Pick up Pseudo, a nifto little utility that allows you to launch an application as root (like sudo in the terminal). The reason Palm Desktop installer requires root-level access is because some of the files it installs are pretty low-level, and Panther has changed how the permissions work at that level.

---
-Jeff



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: Felix on Nov 03, '03 03:10:35PM

There must be some other issue involved here for folks having problems. I'm using Panther and am experiencing no problems HotSyncing to my Palm PDA. I did have to reinstall the iSync Palm Conduit 1.2 from the Apple web site though.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: jmb on Nov 03, '03 11:32:16PM

I did an archive/install from 10.2.8 and all I had to do was copy the HotSync library from my old system to the new one. Everything now seems to work fine with my Tungsten E. And it didn't even require any root-level mojo.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: wealthychef on Nov 04, '03 12:17:49AM

This does not work for me! I don't know what I did to break it, but it has stopped working. I did a fresh install as root, and it still does not work. I seem to have all the needed files, but when I push the Sync button, it does not synchronize.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: virgquest on Nov 06, '03 05:12:03PM

After you copy the hotsync library, run Palm Desktop and click on Hotsync menu ->Setup. Make sure Hotsync is enabled. I did an archive and install of Panther and was able to successfully sync my m515 after completing the above steps.
--Virginia



[ Reply to This | # ]
ANOTHER BS HINT
Authored by: customjake on Nov 05, '03 12:01:52AM
Sorry ppl, but this hint is not true. I've been working with this Panther/Hotsync Problem for a month now, and logging in as root and running the installer will not work on a fresh install of panther.

One of the things that panther has an issue with is creating the hotsync libraries in the /Library/CFMSupport folder. Even under root, the installer will not be able to create the files.

The only way to get Hotsync to work on a FRESH install of Panther is to copy the hotsync libraries to the proper location from an install of Jaguar. This is why simply changing the ownership properties of the this folder does not allow a regular user to install the hotsync.

After copying the hotsync libraries to the /Library/CFMSupport folder, re-running the installer (which will fail again) but it will allow you to run the hotsync.

I do have the hotsync libraries if anyone is in need of them.

Jake

P.S. If you are attempting to get palm hotsync to work under a fresh 10.3, it is critical that you not try to Repair Permissions from the CD. After doing so, the installer will not even begin to copy files.

[ Reply to This | # ]
ANOTHER BS HINT
Authored by: foobar104 on Nov 05, '03 09:34:48AM
The only way to get Hotsync to work on a FRESH install of Panther is to copy the hotsync libraries to the proper location from an install of Jaguar.

Sorry, but that just ain't so. On a brand-new PowerBook G4, I installed Panther (erase and install) from the retail CD's that came in the box, installed iSync, downloaded Palm Desktop from the Palm web site, installed it, then installed the iSync Palm conduit from the Apple site.

Long and short of it? It worked perfectly.

[ Reply to This | # ]

file busy
Authored by: LenyC on Nov 06, '03 05:09:15PM

I tried your tip but it made no difference. The [Palm]conduit manager quits 'unecpectedly' at the end, I can do a hotsync but files are not being exchanged from handheld [Palm 130] to my iMac & vice versa. While the hotsync is happening I get the following messages:
volume is locked or file is busy, when I unlocked my datebook I still had the same message.

Has anyone any idea how to solve this??



[ Reply to This | # ]
re: ANOTHER BS HINT
Authored by: huzzam on Nov 06, '03 06:50:08PM

My God, I'm amazed how many people think, "if it didn't work for me, it won't work for anyone," or "if it worked for me, it will work for everyone." This is not a "BS hint." It worked for some people, including me. Nowhere is there a guarantee that every hint will work for everyone. Rob and the contributors work hard on this site and are not publishing BS. The hints are useful, and some may even work for you.

Similarly, the idea that "I didn't have to do this, so no one else will either" has come up in this thread, among some who say that root access is never necessary. Is it so difficult to understand that some things work in some cases and not in others?



[ Reply to This | # ]
ANOTHER BS HINT
Authored by: cokery on Nov 08, '03 11:02:37AM

I submitted this hint because it does work for me, and has worked for others. I'm sorry it doesn't work for you, bu that doesn't make the hint BS. To say it doesn't work at all is the only BS around here.

As for root access, people shouldn't patronise. I'm not a child and if I feel enablign root is something I want to do then that's my decision. Apple made enabling root access possible for a reason, and disabled it as default for a reason. It isn't something lightly done, but it has its purposes. Why else would it be there?



[ Reply to This | # ]
ANOTHER BS HINT
Authored by: danelgran on Dec 11, '03 04:28:35PM

I could really use those hotsync libraries if you stil have them! dmunoz1@comcast.net

Thanks,

Regards
DM



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: renehinojosa on Nov 06, '03 01:40:14PM

Greetings all,

I also had the problem of 10.3 and Palm. My solution: Install Palm Desktop 4.1. Install iSync 1.3. Install iSync Palm conduit 1.2. Install the mentioned apps in that order. You don't have to login or install them as root just as long as your account is an administrator.

I can now HotSync via bluetooth(have tried cradle yet)



[ Reply to This | # ]
This doesn't work, but here's what Palm Inc says
Authored by: wealthychef on Nov 07, '03 11:38:58AM

I tried reinstalling as root. That did not work. Here is what Palm says to do. Basically, they are pointing to Stuffit as the issue. I haven't tried this yet, just passing it on for the record.

Dear Rich,

Thank you very much for your inquiry. I understand that you are unable
to install Palm(TM) Desktop software version 4.1 on the Macintosh(R)
computer.

Rich, in order to resolve this issue you will need to first install the
latest update of the Stuffit Engine updater 8.0.1 on your computer, then
uninstall the Palm Desktop software completely from your computer
including the installer file, redownload the Palm Desktop software from
our Web site and then install the Palm Desktop software on your
computer. I suggest that you please follow the steps mentioned below to
resolve the issue.

<< Installing Stuffit Engine updater 8.0.1 on your computer >>

Please visit the following Web site to download and install the Stuffit
Engine updater 8.0.1 on your Mac computer. Please click on the URL
below:

http://www.stuffit.com/mac/deluxe/updates.html

You can download Palm Desktop software version 4.1 for Macintosh
computer from the following URL:

http://www.palmone.com/us/support/macintosh/macdesk41_legal.html

<< Uninstall Palm Desktop >>

The best way to fully uninstall Palm(TM) Desktop from Macintosh OS® X
and above is by using the Uninstall feature, which is found at the
Install screen of the Palm Desktop installer.

Note: The Palm Desktop application is located in the Applications folder
of Mac Hard Drive in a folder named Palm. Your personal data in OSX
found in the Users directory: Hard Drive/Users/personal
profile/Documents/Palm/Users

*Uninstall Palm Desktop*

1. Double-click the Palm Desktop installer from the CD.

NOTE: If you do not have the Palm Desktop CD, you can download the
installer file from our Web site at:

http://palm.com/support/downloads/mac_add.html

2. Click Continue at the Read Me file prompt, then select Agree at the
License Agreement form prompt.

3. Click Easy Install and select Uninstall.

4. Place a check mark besides Palm Desktop Software.

5. Click the uninstall button.

6. When pointing the Uninstall utility, please point it at the Palm
folder in the Applications folder.

7. Restart your computer.

After the Restart, please search via Sherlock for any of the following
files. Please be aware of where your information is located and that it
does not get accidentally removed (Refer above for the path).

Do not trash everything under a search for PALM. Trash only the files
that are part of the Palm Desktop application. When in doubt consult
"Show Info". This will tell you whether it is Palm file or not.

Note: In Macintosh OS X the file you want information on, may need to be
accessed directly rather than through Sherlock.

*Searching the Hard Disk*

1. Open Sherlock.

2. Search your Macintosh Hard Drive for the following files:

com.palm.*anyfile*
Palm HotSync (folder and all contents)
Palm Desktop *anyfile*
HotSync *anyfile*
User Data...TF (with and without additional numerals)
Transport Monitor

3. Do not remove the following files, they are not Palm Desktop files:

Palm Sync Installer (Outlook Express)
Palm folder in 'Users' profile.

<< Install Palm Desktop >>

Please follow the steps provided below to install the Palm(TM) Desktop
software on a Macintosh® computer.

<<Before installing Palm Desktop software>>

Before installing the Palm Desktop software on your Macintosh, there are
a few settings that should be verified on the computer. File Sharing
should be Off, and AppleTalk® should be Inactive if you are using a
stand-alone computer. If you are using a Macintosh on a Network, you
may wish to leave the AppleTalk On. However, disabling AppleTalk often
helps with establishing HotSync® connections.


*Turning File Sharing OFF*

1. Click the Apple Menu, then select System Preferences.

2. Click on Sharing.

3. Stop the File Sharing by clicking on the Stop button.


*Disabling AppleTalk*

1. Click the Apple Menu, then select System Preferences.

2. Click on Network and select AppleTalk.

Note: For AppleTalk to be visible under Network on your Macintosh, you
have to configure your Macintosh for an Ethernet connection setup.

3. Uncheck the box next to ?Make AppleTalk Active?.


<<Installing Palm Desktop on a Macintosh computer>>

NOTE: If you do not have the Palm Desktop CD that was shipped with your
Palm handheld computer, you can download a full copy of Palm Desktop
version 4.1 for Macintosh from our Web site at:

http://www.palmone.com/us/support/macintosh/macdesk41_legal.html

1. Insert the Palm Desktop software CD into the CD-ROM Drive. This
should place the Palm Desktop CD icon on your Macintosh desktop.
Double-clicking this icon will open the Palm Desktop folder that
contains the Installer file. Double-click the installer icon to begin.
(If you have downloaded the Palm Desktop for Macintosh, simply
double-click the Installer icon.)

2. A window should appear informing you that you are about to install
the Palm Desktop software.

3. Click Continue, and proceed through the windows until you arrive at
the Installer window.

4. In the upper-left corner, click the drop-down menu and select Easy
Install if you want the Mac OS to install all applications associated
with the Palm Desktop software. Select Custom Install if you wish to
set your own preferences during installation. We suggest the Easy
Install for the installation of the Palm Desktop.

5. Click the Install button in the lower portion of the window. This
should bring up a window asking you where you would like to install the
Palm Desktop software on your hard drive (select the Applications
folder).

6. Once you have selected the location for the Palm Desktop software,
click Choose in the lower-right corner of the window. The installation
should begin and a status bar should appear, indicating the number of
items to be installed.

7. This should bring up the Palm Setup Assistant window, and you should
be prompted to set up the HotSync® Manager software. Click Next.

8. If you are installing the Palm Desktop software for the first time or
after uninstallation, select the 'Create new user' radio button and
click Next. If you have been using Palm Desktop software and are
upgrading, select the ?Locate existing users? radio button, then click
Next.

9. Proceed with the onscreen instructions until the 'Installation was
successful' window appears. Click OK and restart your Macintosh
computer.

Palm, Inc. would like to thank you for your continued patronage. Palm,
Inc. values you as a customer and we look forward to helping you in any
way we can.

For further questions you may send another e-mail message or use our
telephone support at:

(847) 262- PALM (7256)

PLEASE NOTE: Palm handheld products may be subject to a telephone
technical support fee of $25 per incident after 90 days from the date of
purchase. However, if it is determined your handheld requires repair or
if we are unable to resolve the issue, this fee will be waived.

U.S. customers may also purchase the Palm On Call Plan, which provides a
full year of telephone technical support. For more details about this
plan, please visit our Web site at:

http://warranty.palm.com

To learn more about Palm handhelds, software updates, set up guides and
other solutions, be sure to visit the palmOne, Inc. support web site at:


http://www.palmone.com/us/support/

Please take some time to complete the Customer Satisfaction Survey that
will be e-mailed to you for this case. Your response will help us in
our ongoing effort to continually improve our customer support services.
Thank you!


Sincerely,

Pierce M.



[ Reply to This | # ]
StuffIt Matters if you START with 8.0
Authored by: wcattey on Feb 04, '04 05:24:57PM

Mine is one of those cleanly installed Panther systems
that refuses to sync. I have tried EVERYTHING, and I have
this additional information to offer:

<begin pointy hat mode>

I extracted PalmDesktopMac41E.sit
with both StuffIt 8.0.2 and StuffIt 7.0.3.

The resulting Palm\ Desktop\ Installer hierarchies are BIT FOR BIT IDENTICAL.

I believe that 8.0.2 matters if you have StuffIt 8, but not StuffIt 7

----

I have two iMac systems, a 15 inch that is a year old, and a 17 inch that is a couple months old.

The 15 and 17 inch models place their USB ports in different places, so I believe the Logic board on the two are SIGNIFCANTLY different.

BOTH systems were, "Erase the disk and install MacOS 10.3" systems. Both were then updated to 10.3.2.

Using my PalmVx and the SAME Palm-branded USB serial cable, the OLD iMac WILL sync. The NEW iMac will NOT sync.

I believe that copying in libraries from 10.2 is not necessarily an issue.

I am now trying to figure out how to run tests the idea that it's the vintage of the USB on the logic board that matters.

<end pointy hat mode>

-wdc



[ Reply to This | # ]
This doesn't work, but here's what Palm Inc says
Authored by: robandale on Sep 06, '04 04:31:32PM

This advice worked for me, but only when I first logged in as root.



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: MtnBiker on Jan 07, '04 03:15:01PM
I get an error on booting and this error if I try to launch the HotSync program:
The application "HotSync Manager" could not be launched because of a shared library error: "4"
I manually moved the /System/Library/SyncServices/PalmBladeConduit.bundle. I don't think this was a problem in the first version of Panther, but started with 10.3.2 or maybe .1. I can launch Palm Desktop from another hard drive, but can't install it on the current hard drive. In other words I can't HotSync.

---
Hermosa Beach, CA USA

[ Reply to This | # ]

10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: wcattey on Feb 10, '04 12:36:10AM

For those of you still having trouble getting Palm HotSync to work
in Panther, I have a new bit of lore that may be of value:

Plug your Palm USB Serial adapter into the Apple Keyboard's USB hub!

Detail:

I have a 1.25GHz iMac that was installed fresh with Panther, and I
JUST TODAY got it to Sync successfully.

Plugging the Palm HotSync USB adapter into any of the USB ports on the main logic board did not succeed. None of the lore (and I tried it ALL) got
things right.

I assembled a similar setup at the office on an older iMac and it worked.
Yes, Virginia, PalmDesktop 4.1 installed with Pseudo on a CLEAN install of 10.3 (updated to 10.3.2) and uncopressed with StuffIt 7.0.3 that comes vanilla with the Panther distribution, DOES work even with the ancient PalmVx.

Noticing this fact, I went back to my new iMac and plugged the Palm USB Serial adapter into the USB hub on the Apple keyboard, and TA DA! Sync worked.

I've got a bug open to Apple now reporting all this.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Yep, that worked
Authored by: jamesg on Feb 13, '04 12:59:01PM

I can confirm that this previous hint worked.

Running 10.3.2, clean install of Palm Desktop 4.1 by dragging on Pseudo (Kyocera 6035 with PalmConnect USB Adapter).

It absolutely would not sync connected to my USB hub.

The second I plugged into the keyboard port it worked.


Why, Why, Why.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Yep, that worked
Authored by: wcattey on Feb 13, '04 10:03:13PM

I actually think its a USB 2.0 subtlety.
I'm hoping that the USB wizards at Apple sort it out.
I'm gratified to hear it worked for you!



[ Reply to This | # ]
10.3: Make Palm HotSync work in Panther
Authored by: wcattey on Mar 07, '04 12:53:56PM

Further information of use:

I just bought one of those USB/Firewire hubs to organize my cables and to give me more ports. It has USB 1.1 ports.

USB 1.1 WORKS!

So if you have any old hub that speaks USB 1.1 instead of USB 2.0 you should be fine!



[ Reply to This | # ]