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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode System
While trying to trouble shoot a strange problem I am having with the Finder, I started up in single user mode (Apple-S during boot) to run fsck (the unix File System Check utility). When I ran it, I was told that I could not run fsck because File System Journaling was enabled. However, I did not enable it. It looks like it is enabled by default in Panther. The shiny new Disk Utility application would not let me disable it. But if you want to force fsck on a Journaled disk, you can use fsck -f.

[robg adds: Journaling is on by default in Panther, but I thought one of the key benefits was that there was no longer a need to run fsck? Can someone in the know clarify for us?]
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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode | 7 comments | Create New Account
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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode
Authored by: PapaJosh on Oct 30, '03 11:53:04AM

The reason you can't run fsck is because journaled file systems don't need file system checks. Since every file system operation is "journaled", the system will always know what operation was taking place with a system failure occured. It can then go back and finish the operation or reverse the operation.



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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode
Authored by: diamondsw on Oct 30, '03 11:57:46AM

Journaling certainly makes it harder for directory corruption to occur, but it can still happen in certain instances (I had a corrupted superblock a while back, but nothing could fix that). For instance, a bug in the filesystem code could allow bad information to be written to the directory, and the journal wouldn't protect against that.

Your everyday run of the mill disk corruption will be avoided (usually caused by freezes and whatnot), but there are still cases where a journal is not bulletproof.

I don't know about fsck, but DiskWarrior is still your friend, even in these days of journaled file systems.



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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode
Authored by: jonahlee on Oct 30, '03 11:59:23AM

Yes this may be true that you are not supposed to need fsck, but try running /sbin/fsck -f after a major crash, and you can still hit some errors. I found this on Jaguar journaling, and I have gotten it on Panther so far. Maybe my system had some problems previously, but I did still find some issues so...

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- Jonah Lee



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turning off journalling
Authored by: SOX on Oct 30, '03 05:00:18PM

Disk Util will turn of journalling. its just not a button. look in the menus for this option.
fsck -yf



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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode
Authored by: momerath on Oct 30, '03 05:28:13PM

You can make the "disable journaling" button show up in the toolbar by doing "customize toolbar" or one of the shortcuts.



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10.3: Force a file system check in single user mode
Authored by: leslieart on Oct 31, '03 07:46:39AM

According to Apple, running fsck on a journaled disk will generate false errors. See http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=107250 for details

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leslie



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Use fsck to find troublesome files
Authored by: dand on Oct 31, '03 08:29:35PM

I was having trouble with my iBook (in 10.2.6 and 10.2.8 with journalling enabled) whenever I tried to boot into OS 9. Often, but not always, it would get stuck during the boot with a flashing question-mark disk icon. Booting from a backup HD, I ran fsck on my internal drive and I got a couple of "overlapping extent files" errors. fsck did not fix these after numerous attempts.

Finally I found some piece of information online that suggested these bad files were created by certain Limewire downloads. The problem was fixed by removing the bad files after looking up their inode numbers ("find / -inum ###" I believe). At least it appears to be fixed for the moment...

So the moral of the story is, it may be wise to run fsck -fn every once in a while even if you have a journalled drive.



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