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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info OS X Server
While looking at a server share point I admin, I learned an interesting anomaly that I hadn't been aware of before. When I login to the server remotely, I login as jmserver. Say I create a folder on the mounted sharepoint. That is, I don't drag it from the client machine to the server, but rather create a folder directly in the folder of the sharepoint.

When I look at that folder with the Finder of the client machine (ie I'm not working on the server directly), "Get Info" tells me that the owner of that file is "blank." Why doesn't the Finder know that jmserver is the owner?

MacManager tells me that the UID for the user jmserver on the server is 1035. New folders created on that share point then are owned by jmserver with UID 1035 (you can see the UIDs of a given file with ls -n).

NetInfo is the tool that associates the UIDs of files with the names of the owners. In this case, there are two NetInfo Databases -- one on the client machine, and one on the server. NetInfo on my client machine doesn't have an entry for a UID of 1035, so when the (client) Finder asks NetInfo who is associated with 1035, it reports back with a "blank." I tested this by creating a new user on the local machine with a UID of 1035 -- and, bob's your uncle, the Finder began reporting that the owner was the new user.

The bottom line is that the Get Info view of permissions is not be trusted when looking at a server share; you can only believe the terminal. And, if you need to change permission settings, you will only be able to do this in the terminal, not with the Get Info view, since it only allows owners to make those changes, and it doesn't recognize you as an owner.
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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info
Authored by: foobar104 on Aug 18, '03 10:59:59AM

I'm unclear as to why this is a hint, exactly. This is the expected behavior. If you log in to a remote machine as <i>another user,</i> anything you create or touch on that machine will <i>not</i> be owned by the user you're logged into your local machine as.

The best practice (the only acceptable practice, really) is to keep user names and UID synchronized across clients and servers. In a small environment, the databases can be maintained manually quite easily. In a large environment, Mac OS X Server is your solution.



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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info
Authored by: lee1 on Aug 18, '03 03:27:41PM
I'm unclear as to why this is a hint, exactly. This is the expected behavior. If you log in to a remote machine as another user, anything you create or touch on that machine will not be owned by the user you're logged into your local machine as.

It seems to me that was exactly his point; more specifically, that the Finder fails to recognize the correct ownership and permissions. Perhaps you need to read the hint more slowly.

Personally, I avoid mounting remote volumes, because the Finder is so bad at dealing with them. The only times I've had to reboot recently were when I made the mistake of trying to use personal file sharing; if there is a lack of response of the server or anything about the mounted volume that the Finder doesn't like, I get the eternal beachball, and the locked-up Finder quickly brings down the entire GUI. There is no force-quitting or Finder-relaunching available. This is in 10.2.4.



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It'll time out
Authored by: spudly on Aug 18, '03 04:46:30PM

This will time out after 2 minutes and you'll get your Mac back without rebooting. An annoyance held over from a bygone era i know but hopefully will change in 10.3...



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It'll time out
Authored by: Ganymede on Aug 18, '03 11:17:38PM
2 minutes? Excuse me, more often than not OSX never comes back. Despite the grandiose claims of stability, herein lies the nether region where OSX is, for me at least, not only a crashing bore but an unbearable waste of time - I've resorted to holding down the power button until it reboots more than on all my other Macs combined (I started with a 128K, when you were just a gleam in -oops, don't go there).

I'll agree it's unfortunate to run classic apps (old, perhaps geriatric?) while using a VPN tunnel to aging PC networks in order to talk to far away VAXes, especially as I'm neither networking expert nor unix guru (and my employer's tech support staff won't/don't/can't support home workers on Macs). But the relentless, eternal beachball is unforgivable. I know that success must lie just beyond the pane of this looking glass! Yet I've been unable to make VPC or VNC work - even on my local Mac network.

Is there an OSX time-out setting I can adjust somewhere, so I can avoid permanent deep-space?


Ganymede

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It'll time out
Authored by: stevanreese on Aug 19, '03 08:58:26AM

The 2 minute time out is per connection. 2 lost connections 4 minutes...



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It'll time out
Authored by: lee1 on Aug 19, '03 04:14:57PM

Some else who needs to read more slowly....

I did mention that the hung Finder starts taking out the rest of the GUI, and that force-quitting doesn't work. In light of this, what magic do you think is going to happen after my two minutes are up?



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It'll time out
Authored by: n9yty on Aug 19, '03 05:10:49PM

Two minutes on crack.....


Well, two minutes is not the answer. As others have said... I have exactly ONE connection I mount on my laptop at work. If I forget to unmount it before I leave for the day (from a MacOS X Server 10.2) and I go home and wake up the computer, I'm hosed.

I let it sit for over two hours one day with the spinning beachball... No luck at all.

The only thing I've found to be of any help at all is if you first notice the problem in an app other than Finder (when they try to write to disk is when the problem hits), and you still can switch your network connection over to where the server is, SOMETIMES it will reconnect and continue normally. However, when I go home, this is never an option, and so a reboot is the only fix.

This is the only remaining type of "crash" or "freeze" I encounter on MacOS X, at least with the work I do.



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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info
Authored by: JimMueller on Dec 20, '03 02:48:30AM

> In a small environment, the databases can be maintained manually quite easily.

Probably "quite easily" if you know what you're doing!

I guess two PowerBooks, a G5, a couple of printers and a G4 Sawtooth with Personal File Sharing turned on acting as our file server would count as a small environment in anyone's book, so what databases should I be maintaining, where are they and what am I doing to maintain them?

Is this something like using "yp" in unix to synchronize usernames & passwords? I never had anything to do with it, but I recall hearing it mentioned.



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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info
Authored by: stevanreese on Aug 18, '03 03:55:50PM

Both the hint and the above reply are good information. UID's are not a traditional Mac environment issue and, a UID mismatch does not prevent the user from doing any other task that they have rights to do. For the general user this will not be an issue unless they have a need to change ownership of a file. Of course it is always better to be complete and follow best practices when ever possible.
stevan



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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info
Authored by: amacaulay on Aug 19, '03 04:02:23AM

While I'd say this was expected Unix behaviour, I agree that it's well worth pointing out to Mac users. Unix sysadmins working with me in the past used to maintain consistent UIDs across machines to ease this sort of problem.



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Server share points, ownership, and Get Info
Authored by: Bobson on Aug 20, '03 08:17:33PM

I'd like to point out that while the owner/group associated with a file on a share may not show up right, the permissions themselves do. So if you just want to change someone from read-only to read/write, you can do that without worrying about whatever name shows up in the Get Info.



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Update for Tiger
Authored by: JohnnyMnemonic on Oct 31, '05 08:42:22AM

In looking through my old submitted hints, I found this one--and it looks like it's now out of date.

In 10.2 and above, the Finder now uses "Privilege Mapping"--so you may well see the file's owner from the server reflected in the Get Info--but not actually on the CLI.

See kBase 107485 for more.



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