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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool Apps
Using TeX and LaTeX to write technical documents is undoubtedly familiar to lots of readers, but what might not be so obvious is the fact that a TeX engine in concert with the latest version of TeXShop makes for an immensely useful PDF manipulation package.

TeXShop will open any PDF file dropped on its icon, and you can copy and paste any rectangular section of a PDF file into, for example, OmniGraffle, Keynote or PowerPoint. Even easier, you can drag across a section of the PDF file using the selection tool in TeXShop and then drag-and-drop that section into a document from another application. (Drag and drop to the desktop produces a PDF file called "texshop_image.PDF".)

This is incredibly useful if you're adding equations to a diagram: just typeset all of the equations using LaTeX (for example) in a single document, and drag and drop the individual portions whereever they're required. As true PDF files the resulting insertions are resizeable without a loss of clarity. PowerPoint presentations containing equations are incredibly easy to manage, and of course the output that TeX/TeXShop produces is vastly superior to that from, for instance, equation editor. Keynote presentations also accept dragged PDF documents. This sort of capability has previously required a separate application (such as "LaTeX Equation Editor").

If you don't have a TeX installationm there are clear instructions on Richard Koch's TeXShop page (linked above). It's a big download, but the quality of the documents produced using the resulting packages make it well worth the effort. The PDF manipulation mentioned here is really the icing on the cake. Finally, if PDF isn't your favoured format, the dragged sections can be exported/dragged in either PNG, JPG or TIFF format.
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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: ateles on Aug 14, '03 11:17:58AM

Yeah, these new editing capabilities of TeXShop really rule! Although I prefer PDF as the format I ran into some trouble when dragging PDF cutouts into Keynote and then exporting to PowerPoint (for some reason PowerPoint doesn't deal very well with PDF's). But since you can select the export file type, that is easily fixed. Now we need Texshop to be able to produce RTF's from TeX files to enable sharing and edition of documents for non LaTeX or TeX users (i.e. Word people). Has anybody run into anything that works in this area?

---
Eco-programmer by heart



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LaTeX2rtf
Authored by: bonzo2000 on Aug 14, '03 12:37:36PM
latex2rtf (also available as a Fink package).

And yes, TeXShop is a great program. I've used LaTeX on and off since 1991, and this is the best integration of writing and previewing LaTeX documents I've seen. The drag-and-drop of selected areas of PDFs is killer.

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LaTeX2rtf
Authored by: ateles on Aug 14, '03 02:32:07PM

I have not been able to use Latex2rtf successfully...it always gives me errors...Do you know of any other way?

thx

---
Eco-programmer by heart



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: ianstanley on Jan 16, '04 11:46:49AM

As I am normally writing long or complex reports in TeXShop then the last thing I need is some windows user editing my nice report and forwarding a word document to the intended recipient messing up the format, content and quality.

I have yet to find a use for such an export. However, a built in option to do the reverse would be handy.

;)



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: ejensen on Aug 14, '03 01:10:34PM

One other use for TeXShop is to convert encapsulated postscript .eps files into nicely cropped .pdf files. Just drag the file (with a .eps extension) onto TeXShop (or use Open...) and TeXShop converts it (actually it just calls a command line tool). This is handier (and cheaper) than using an image manipulation application such as Photoshop). Also it works better than using the print dialog to save as a .pdf, since that will leave a lot of whitespace around the graphic.



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is there a fink version?
Authored by: SOX on Aug 14, '03 03:55:04PM

I like installing via fink since it makes updates transparent to the user. is there a fink version of texShop



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is there a fink version?
Authored by: herbs on Aug 14, '03 05:23:20PM

Howdy,

No fink version needed since TeXShop is a Cocoa Program that is a front end for TeX/LaTeX, Ghostscript, etc.

You will need a TeX distribution and it is possible to set up TeXShop to use either Gerben Wierda's teTeX/TeXLive (my favorite) or the Fink distribution.

Go to the TeXShop site: <http://www.uoregon.edu/~koch/texshop/texshop.html> to get more information.

Good Luck,
Herb Schulz


---
Herb Schulz



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is there a fink version?
Authored by: slacker on Aug 14, '03 06:58:48PM

I started poking around in the package. It looks like most of the external files are called with wrapper scripts. If you insert "source /sw/bin/init.csh" below #!/bin/tcsh line it should find them in fink if I trace the logic correctly. You need to do it in every file with wrap at the end in the Contents/Resources directory.

/Applications/TeXShop.app/Contents/Resources$ more contextwrap
#!/bin/tcsh

# This short script calls texexec to run a conTeXt job
# Richard Koch; September 14, 2001

set mytexexecpath = "$argv[1]"
if (-x ${mytexexecpath}texexec) then
setenv PATH "${mytexexecpath}:${PATH}"
rehash
endif

set filename = "$argv[2]"

texexec --pdf "${filename}"



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is there a fink version?
Authored by: herbs on Aug 17, '03 11:40:17AM

Howdy,

I think it's easier than that. You can change the paths to the software from the preferences within TeXShop.

Good Luck,
Herb Schulz


---
Herb Schulz



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: macman13 on Aug 14, '03 04:45:49PM

Anyone know of a simple way to combine multiple pdfs into one pdf file???
Thanks.

---
\\\"I can do everything on my Mac I used to do on my PC, plus alot more ...\\\"
--Me



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: herbs on Aug 14, '03 05:28:21PM

Howdy,

If you have TeX/LaTeX with the pdfpages package (part of Gerben Wierda's i-installer teTeX/TeXLive distribution, I don't know about the Fink distribution) it's easy. See the documentation.

I know there are other solutions, some quite expensive, but since we're talking TeX/LaTeX here...

Good Luck,
Herb Schulz


---
Herb Schulz



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: pmccann on Aug 14, '03 08:56:22PM

Here's a way that works fine: make a document in TeXShop with the following contents, and simply process away. This will produce a new pdf containing all the pages from 1.pdf, pages 4 to 6 of 2.pdf and pages 4 to 5 and 10 to 14 of 3.pdf.

Cheers, Paul

\documentclass[letter]{article}
\usepackage{pdfpages}
\begin{document}
\includepdf[pages=1-]{/Users/pmccann/Desktop/1.pdf}
\includepdf[pages=4-6]{/Users/pmccann/Desktop/2.pdf}
\includepdf[pages={4-5,10-14}]{/Users/pmccann/Desktop/3.pdf}
\end{document}


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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: pmccann on Aug 14, '03 08:59:05PM

Sigh... will I ever learn? Preview bites again.

Please prefix each and every one of the lines in my previous message with a backslash.



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: Miga on Aug 14, '03 09:19:31PM

Use Macros Menu in TexShop.

1 - Choose Open Macro Editor.

2 - Click on new item

3 - Give a name to your macro (for example: merge pdf) in the name field

4 - Type the following in the Contents field

\documentclass[11pt]{article}
\usepackage{graphicx}
\usepackage[final]{pdfpages}
\begin{document}
\includepdf[pages=-]{/Users/yourusername/Desktop/file}
\end{document}

5 - Click on separator to make a clear separation between the default macros and your macros, if it is the first one.

6 - Use key and modifiers if you want a shortcut

7 - Click on test (it should work providing you have a pdf file named file.pdf on your desktop

8 - Click on save

This gives you a skeleton to merge pdf files.
When you want to merge two or more pdf files, just duplicate this line as many times as you have files to merge and just change the path for the files and eventually the number of pages:

\includepdf[pages=-]{/Users/yourusername/Desktop/file}

Note that you don't have to put the files on the desktop, that's just my way of doing that.

---
Michele



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: gedalin on Aug 15, '03 07:03:40AM

Try Combine PDFs



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: vincenth on Aug 18, '03 07:24:46AM

I tried using the selection tool of TeXShop (1.30) in the PDF view of my TeX file. I got the file called "texshop_image.pdf" ; but when I try to include this PDF file in a PowerPoint presentation and set the size of the image to 200 %, I can see the pixels in the image. So in my case, the resulting PDF insertions are resizable, but with a loss of clarity. I think that the generated PDF file is (in my case) the pdf conversion of the screenshot of the preview window, and not a really true PDF file...

Did I miss something ?

PS : I am using tetex distribution of fink, and not the one provided by Gerben Wierda



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: LEFrank on Aug 19, '03 05:06:10AM

I experienced the same thing: the resulting PDF insertions are resizable, but with a loss of clarity. I tried saving the selection in different formats (tiff, jpg) but all show a loss of clarity. I discoverd however that setting the scale to 300% or more in the original pdf document from which the selection is copied, yields a better result. It confirms, I think, the idea that the copies are not true pdf files, but conversions of the screenshot of the preview window.



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: googoo on Aug 19, '03 09:33:43AM

The problem is in PowerPoint--not TeXShop. PowerPoint creates a bitmapped image when you insert a PDF file because it does not have native PDF graphics. The workaround is to open the PDF file in a PDF viewer (I use Acrobat Reader for this). Then, magnify the image to some ridiculous size (i.e., 500% or more). Use the graphics selection tool to copy the image and paste into PowerPoint. Then, in PowerPoint shrink the image to the correct size.

I used the above procedure for years before I discovered Keynote with its native PDF graphics. I hardly ever use PowerPoint any more.

-Mark



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attention !
Authored by: nbd on Nov 08, '03 11:48:34AM

if you are using the rectangle drag from texshop preview to define your cut-out-area, be shure to set preview to 100%. otherwise it won't capture the whole content of the rectangle.



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Use TeXShop as a PDF manipulation tool
Authored by: Torben E Lund on Jul 14, '04 03:44:39PM

TeXShop ideed is a nice program, but does anybody know of a program, other than acrobat, in which you can ad comments in the PDF file?

Torben



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