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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection Site News
There have been a number of hints submitted regarding various methods of evading the copy protection on songs bought from the iTunes Music Store. I have decided that I will not be publishing any of these methods as hints, for a couple of reasons.

The first and most important reason is the existence of the DMCA, which can bring harsh penalties to those promoting methods of disabling or circumventing copyright protection. As my primary objective is to keep macosxhints online, avoiding DMCA violations is fairly high on the list of things to do. While some of you will probably call me a "wimp" for not even trying just to see what happens, I have no interest in being a test case nor attracting unwanted attention to macosxhints.com.

The second reason I won't run any of these hints is that the information is already out there, in a number of locations (probably even posted here somewhere in the unmoderated comments from various posters, though I haven't read every comment on every hint). Those who really wish to create protection-free versions of their purchased songs can easily find out how to do so.

Finally, I will close by saying that I firmly believe in the right of fair use, and that a purchased song should be usable however you wish, as long as it's for your own use only. As a purchaser of a few songs from the store, I'm quite irked that I can't play them on my living room's MP3 player (see the Serve your MP3 collection to your stereo hint).

My personal feelings on the matter don't change the fact that publishing hints on how to work around the iTunes copy protection puts the macosxhints site at risk of attracting the wrong kind of attention. Since I don't want that kind of attention, the most realistic solution is to avoid publishing such hints. While I hope that you'll all understand my position, I'm sure I'll catch some flak for it ... so be it. I'm one person with a $0 legal defense fund, and I'd like to make sure it stays at that level...

-rob.
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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: sim on May 07, '03 11:32:28AM

I totally agree with you. Thank you for your good judgement.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: digitol on May 07, '03 11:53:21PM

Since everyone is agreeing with your descision NOT to post this hint, I will say ROB you Phucking Poosy!! Although I do understand your position, I am just having some fun here. :) :P



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: nedly on May 08, '03 02:40:52AM

Another data point:

TiVo just turned on an Home Network Stereo option on their Series 2. I
was impressed that with a little effort I had it online with my Airport
and was able to play both my iMac and iBook iTunes library from my
living room sound system.

However, my Purchased Music folder is not available on the TiVo, I am
hoping that it will be fixed in a future release. Doens't make sense that I
can see my CD iTune Library, just not songs purchaed from the iMusic
Store. Maybe when the Windows support is released later this year.

Not clear on the policy about 3 Macs. But it doens't seem that I can store
my Purchase Music on my iBook, only my iPod and my iMac. I can see
my Purchased Music on my iBook via the Shared feature. Guess that's
the way it supposed to work, just not with my TiVo.

Sigh ...



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: extra88 on May 08, '03 10:19:47AM

At this point, TiVo can't play AAC files. There's a good chance it will add AAC support in a software upgrade but it's unlikely it will ever be able to play tracks purchased through iTMS because of the DRM. To play a purhcased track a device has to be authorized. Authorization requires iTunes to contact an Apple server. Your TiVo may have a network connection but it doesn't have iTunes and it probably never will. Windows is going to get support for the Music Store because Apple is writing an iTunes for Windows.

You can play purchased tracks on your iBook just by copying the files to it just like any other file then authorizing the tracks on the iBook (which requires a network connection). Once the tracks are authorized on your iBook, they don't have to be re-authorized.



[ Reply to This | # ]
personal vs. "professional"
Authored by: saint.duo on May 07, '03 11:46:29AM

I completely agree with you. Like you, I personally believe that
I should be able to do whatever I want with my music, as long
as it stays with me. Keeping hints on circumventing the DRM in
the purchased music off of macosxhints is probably a very wise
choice, and I think the overall levelheaded and sensible
community here will agree.

---
--
duo



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: beedee on May 07, '03 11:51:22AM

you forgot the biggest reason why AAC copy protection hints needn't be posted... BECAUSE IT'S INSANELY EASY.

Anyone who can't figure out how to burn and re-rip a CD isn't worth the time to post a hint!



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: kevinv on May 07, '03 04:39:48PM

cute how you slid that in. darn funny!



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: mm2270 on May 07, '03 11:53:57AM

Rob- you're doing the smart thing by not posting hints
regarding this. Best to stay out of the radar of the likes of the
RIAA and such. And yes, it's very easy to figure out how to get
around the protection anyway, so no point in wasting time with
it, when there are so many better hints that can be posted
here.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: robJ on May 07, '03 11:58:57AM

Good decision Rob. Those who might complain should start their own web site
for such stuff. I doubt that many are as willing to risk their own assets as they
are to risk yours.

-- another Rob



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: robJ on May 07, '03 11:59:32AM

Good decision Rob. Those who might complain should start their own web site
for such stuff. I doubt that many are as willing to risk their own assets as they
are to risk yours.

-- another Rob



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: Mr. X on May 07, '03 12:00:28PM

It's pretty obvious you're doing that only because of the DMCA-
RIAA danger. And I'm sure everyone will understand. It's a
shame to be censured like that in the "free world" but your
position makes sense in the light of what happened before w/
2600 and all the others...
It's probably a wise decision even though IT SUCKS! ;)



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: zaphon on May 07, '03 12:30:56PM

Well I'm kind of torn by this. I do understand your wish to not
get involved in an ugly DMCA case, but at the same time think
that this whole DMCA business is getting out of hand.

I think it would be one thing for you to provide instructions on
how to rip it, and than promote a free service for everyone to
share their purchased music. But on the other hand, in the
interest of your legal rights to fair use, the files being in a
protected format, only leaves you with 1 choice to fairly use
them on ALL systems.

Now at the same time, it truly is SIMPLE to do. And no you
don't have to burn a CD to do it, there are plenty of apps
already on your hard drive that have not been AAC encryption
enabled and hence will freely do the job for you. I'm sure that
the next revs of these programs will remove this ability, but who
knows.

Anyway, I personally feel it's pretty sad that a site that
promotes information can't desiminate with information that
isn't there for the mass piracy of music, but rather for the
consumer to enjoy his full rights to fair use.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: terceiro on May 07, '03 05:19:06PM
Shoot. Now I'm intrigued. I don't even have any iTMS music I've purchased yet... but I have to know what applications already on my hard drive that can remove .m4p protection...

Caveat: as I said, I don't have any files to even use it on. Even if I did, I don't support stealing music, under any circumstances.

(Was that a caveat or a disclaimer?)

[ Reply to This | # ]

Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: DougAdams on May 07, '03 12:33:15PM

Support you all the way, Rob!

---



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: Killer Terminal on May 07, '03 01:08:02PM
I totally agree with you, Rob. If anyone truly needs to know, I think that they can find out the information on their own. I do believe that the RIAA is getting out of hand with the whole Digital Millennium Copyright Act, but I still believe that the artists should be rewarded and compensated for the hard work they put into their music.

It's just plain stupid to risk all of macosxhints.com just for a few measly hints about bypassing the digital rights management in music from the iTunes Music Store, especially when it's all there on other sites for people that are really that desperate to get past the protection.

Where would we all be without this site? People, don't put Rob on the spot like this by posting hints that would get him in trouble. Think before you post!

Rob, you made the right decision by not publishing this information. I support you all the way.

[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: bussdriver on May 07, '03 12:59:29PM

Its only a deterrant protection, which is enough for most computer users who can't even switch their homepage...

We want to promote this legal solution to the problem at hand. (which has been blown way out of size by the RIAA in these bad economic times.)

I think its too expensive and still hurts artists (the true purpose of the RIAA); however, I will heavily support it hoping that everyone else follows suit. Then when the CD dies and the mp3/mp4 moves in---it will be hard for the RIAA to controll the next phase ----- artists not needing the recording "industry" (aka cartel).

---
ttfn,



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: BMarsh on May 07, '03 03:21:55PM

there are some signs of this being the beginning of the next step
already... as has been mentioned in a few interviews, Apple is
talking with Independant artists to get their work on iTMS as
well, this gets a more direct line to the artist if they can break
away from needing the big label to get started. It helps the
independants by having a (currently US wide) very wide
distribution method for very little work for the independant.

It will be interesting to see where it all goes =)
Personally I'm saving any money I was going to be spending on
CD's until Apple gets the Canadian iTunes Music Store going...



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: Auricchio on May 07, '03 01:06:10PM
Add another vote for good judgement.

In a time when record companies (and their money) seem to be able to proceed unchecked toward their goal of eliminating illegal copying, it's wise not to give them cause to look your way.

This situation is a frightening one, because it appears that money can make anything legal, no matter how invasive or potentially destructive it may be. We can only hope that smarter heads will prevail and reign in this witch hunt. Illegal copying is a problem, but as long as the public cannot separate corporate weasels from creative composers, the situation will continue.

Remember how everyone hated "The Phone Company" in the 60s? Nobody hated the individual engineers, operators, or linemen: they hated the monopoly and what it represented.

---
EMOJO: mojo no longer workin'

[ Reply to This | # ]

Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: shannprice on May 07, '03 01:24:15PM

I agree.

You briefly spoke of fair use... Does anyone know if the
purchased music can be streamed to a "Media Option" enabled
Tivo like the rest of your MP3 collection?



[ Reply to This | # ]
No
Authored by: daveschroeder on May 07, '03 01:28:38PM

The TiVo/TiVo Desktop currently does not support AAC.

Of course, you can just burn and rerip as MP3 (what
degradation in quality there is won't be noticed by the vast,
vast majority of listeners).



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: haniel on May 07, '03 01:31:11PM

Rob,

I applaud your decision, but I would respect it more if it weren't based on fear of reprisal from the DMCA.

To me this is not about censorship but good judgement. Few would question your integrity if you refused to publish instructions on using a Mac to detonate a fertilizer bomb. So should it be different because music piracy is a crime with fewer consequences?

There's a time to take a stand. Now that there is a legitimate legal alternative, I think it's time for some of us to show leadership in supporting artists.



[ Reply to This | # ]
About fair use...
Authored by: robg on May 07, '03 02:31:20PM
The reason I would be willing to publish such hints, if it were not for the DMCA, is that I think there are legitimate uses of an unencrypted song that one has legally bought -- the example of streaming it to my living room MP3 player, for example.

So it is a good thing to know how to do, and can be used for legal purposes (assuming fair use still applies), unlike the fertilizer bomb scenario. I for one would use such a process to allow my entire home to have access to the tunes that I have legally purchased. I would not, however, ever allow such a tune to be given away to others for that would be hurting the artists in the long run...

So that's why the DMCA came up as the primary reason -- it's preventing me from publishing info that I think has good value and can be used in a non-copyright-infringing manner.

-rob.

[ Reply to This | # ]
Legitimate use of explosives
Authored by: _merlin on May 07, '03 07:39:53PM

If you published a hint on getting a ProfiBus card working on OSX, and the application was detonating explosives, woudn't this be legitimate? Explosives are used in mining, construction, emergency services...

Aside: I wouldn't be using it for detonating explosives, but I would very much like to see ProfiBus and ProfiNet supported on OSX. It would make OSX viable for industrial control.



[ Reply to This | # ]
About fair use...
Authored by: haniel on May 08, '03 10:56:01AM

I too have an auditotron and would like to be able to play my aac files over it (although I'm thinking of ditching it for a rendezvous enabled tivo). I think it's logical to assume that these devices will soon be aac compliant which is why I'm thinking of going to tivo. They seem to be a more mac friendly company.

Your editorial policy is your decision. I just think it's time for responsible people to advocate responsible use. No matter how evil the record companies are, the artists who give us so much happiness deserve to some compensation. I wish people would take more of a stand on this and stop worrying about pissing off the internet culture.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: miles_thatsme on May 07, '03 01:31:50PM

Fair enough--no one can demand you assume legal risks on their
behalf. That said, I would hope that you rely upon your
disclaimer with respect to posted comments. If people choose to
submit 'hints' in their comments, you are in no way endorsing
the described behaviour.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Yep!
Authored by: robg on May 07, '03 02:25:54PM

Since I don't moderate, see, or otherwise touch the comments, I
have no interest in starting to do so now. There wouldn't be
enough time, for one thing ;-).

But more importantly, because what others write is freely posted
without my review, and I don't allow anonymous comments,
anyone that wishes to can have a follow-up conversation via the
author link at the top of every comment. Right or wrong, I
think this gives me an out if I'm asked about it, as the comment
system is unmoderated.

-rob.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: robd on May 07, '03 03:08:40PM

Gee, another reason to not publish hints on breaking the
protected AAC format is so we can help our
good friends at Apple! The Apple Music Store DRM is pretty
darn reasonable. Why do we have to subvert it?! Let's help
make Apple Music and iTunes the next killer app! Let's help
Apple be the best computer company ever. Let's help make this
whole music downloading thing work! Let's make the idiots
at the RIAA go away in shame because the Apple Store really
works.

Keep up the great job Rob!



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: cocoamix on May 07, '03 03:16:38PM

I agree with Rob's decision.
If you REALLY want to know, I'm sure Google will provide leads. I don't want to see OS X Hints get in trouble for any reason.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Don't forget what Apple have achieved
Authored by: johnny Panix on May 07, '03 03:20:45PM

I totally agree with this. Although I'm sure most of us support
the Fair Use movement, we also support Apple, and they've
certainally done an amazing job in convincing the record
companies to sign up to a 'relatively' liberal usage policy.

I work for a record company, and I know how paranoid and
illogical they are about music downloading, so when i first heard
of the itunes store policy i was quite frankly amazed. If this
more laid back approach can proven to be a success, it could be
an important stepping stone to a more measured approach from
the music industry.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: mbrewer01 on May 07, '03 04:01:54PM

Whether or not you agree with the DMCA, it is the law
and the decision to respect and, dare I say, obey the law is a
good one.

Instead of wrestling with whether or not to obey the DMCA, one
should be actively engaged in trying to overturn it, especially
since it does take away a lot of our fair use rights. http://eff.org

I agree with the decision to not post those circumvention hints.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: unconfused1 on May 08, '03 03:30:02PM

Yes, it is the law. But you have to know when civil disobedience is a necessary step to deal with legal irrationality.

I'm certainly not saying that this is the time or the place. But sweeping statements like, "Its the law...therefore respect it..." and such comments like that makes my stomach go a little queezy.

The DMCA and Super-DMCA's really need to be opposed. Fair use is a victim. The AppleMusic.com site is being fairly reasonable in this respect.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: macubergeek on May 07, '03 04:33:59PM

My only caveat here is that I'd like to verify that Apple isn't transmitting my credit card number in any form embedded in the ACC file format somehow....



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: exsilio on May 07, '03 06:01:47PM

Good call..always best to cover you butt.

But this is why I wont buy ANY iTunes. If I buy a CD I can do
whatever I want with it. Personal usage or loan it to a friend and
let him make a tape or CD copy of it.

For years I have gone over to friends houses and copied their
CDs, Tapes, LPs...with no feeling of guilt..why should there be?
And by that same token I have bought a lot of music as well.

I say SCREW the record companies and the artist. I am not
selling the music...if I put it online and someone downloads it,
good for them..it's the same thing as a friend coming over to
make a copy of it and listen to it.

You'll have to excuse me if I don't shed a tear for the obscenely
overpaid 'artist' and record moguls. Boo hoo! They'll only make
10 million instead of 12..whatever.

iTunes is convenient but far too restrictive. When I own the CD I
can rip it at whatever quality I want, share it with ANY of my
firends and play it on ANY damned MP3 I have...in my car, my
mobile player, my living room..and take it to work and play it.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: exsilio on May 07, '03 06:03:32PM

Good call..always best to cover you butt.

But this is why I wont buy ANY iTunes. If I buy a CD I can do
whatever I want with it. Personal usage or loan it to a friend
and let him make a tape or CD copy of it.

For years I have gone over to friends houses and copied their
CDs, Tapes, LPs...with no feeling of guilt..why should there be?
And by that same token I have bought a lot of music as well.

I say SCREW the record companies and the artist. I am not
selling the music...if I put it online and someone downloads it,
good for them..it's the same thing as a friend coming over to
make a copy of it and listen to it.

You'll have to excuse me if I don't shed a tear for the obscenely
overpaid 'artist' and record moguls. Boo hoo! They'll only make
10 million instead of 12..whatever.

iTunes is convenient but far too restrictive. When I own the CD
I can rip it at whatever quality I want, share it with ANY of my
firends and play it on ANY damned MP3 I have...in my car, my
mobile player, my living room..and take it to work and play it.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: hayesk on May 07, '03 09:40:00PM

Actually, it's people like you that causes the RIAA to act paranoid and
require things like DRM. You are so mistaken on a couple of fronts:

1. You believe every artist is rich. Wrong, only the very successful
artists are rich. Most artists barely scrape out a comfortable living.
And what about the song writers and studio musicians? They certainly
aren't rich. If everyone acted like you, there would be no musicians or
writers and you would have no music to copy.

2. You think serving your music up and if someone copies it, it is not
your problem. Wrong, you offered it up to be copied illegally. When
you buy the music, you own the medium, and the right to listen to it
yourself. You do not have the right to allow others to copy it. That is
illegal, whether you like it or not.

Like in any business, people who produce the products you consume
deserve to be compensated. Do you work for no pay? Why should
artists? If you believe that you deserve to either get it for free, or
deserve to allow others to get it for free, then you are both selfish
and a hypocrite.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: exsilio on May 08, '03 02:50:05AM

wow..aren't you the ignorant slut.

actually you are more likea sheep. And it's sheep like you that
get fleeced. You don't see the big picture. you don't see that the
consumer has rights..you blindly follow what you are told by the
recording industry and behave liek the good lil sheep you are
baa baa

I understand business far better than you ever will..I have been
involved in consumer products at the highest levels for quite
sometime..and it disgust me. we love people like you cuz you
do what we want, you are like a mindless drone that consumes
and nevers stops to consider why or at what cost..perfect for big
business.

I'm out of business now, because fleecing people like you
bothers my conscience.

And regarding copying music...I want you to go and arrest every
person that made a mix tape for a girl or boy and sue the,. then
sue their parents. Where do you draw the line little sheep?
Consumers have rights and we need to flex our muscles more. If
I buy it and want to make a copy of it I WILL. Will I sell it?
Make money off it? Nope...but I will gladly let ANYONE copy it
from me and I, in turn will copy from them.

Now go away and graze like the good lil sheep you are...don't
stop to ask why? Or how much is too much? And what are my
rights as the consumer.

FYI: There have been studies of the "lesser" paid unknown artist
liking programs like Kazaa and Napster because it gets their
music out there and then people still go to the store and buy it.

Baa baa.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: andriven on May 08, '03 11:53:56AM

Ummm....the previous poster was articulating was some rational thoughts. You answered with cursing, insults and ad hominem attacks.

Nuff said.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: exsilio on May 08, '03 03:58:19PM

I love nubs like you.

You offer nothing of substance or value...you act as the defender
of the universe..go away.

So this is rational?
"...it's people like you that causes..." (nice absolute)

"... You believe every artist is rich." (Gee, don't remember
saying that..that's quite an assumption)

"If everyone acted like you, there would be no musicians or
writers and you would have no music to copy." (wow...talk
about a bleak outlook and gross generalization.)

I want bother with addressing the rest. But you sir should shut
the hell up and go hug a tree or save a whale. This nub you are
defending is not worth it...and neither are you. Not one of you
understands what it is you are referring to.

Get...a....clue.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: hayesk on May 08, '03 05:35:59PM

Can you debate anything without resulting to childish insults?

You copy and allow others to copy music - which is illegal. This is also the reason record companies are trying to put in DRM technology into music. My comment "people like you" is perfectly valid.

You also referred to artists as being rich. Do you personally verify the net worth of every artist from whom you steal? Again, my point seems valid. Maybe you don't believe *every* artists is rich, but I don't believe you think about that when offering up music to be copied or copy it yourself.

You also made up a story about you being some kind of consumer "big-wig". Based on your grammar, spelling, and inability to debate or state an opinion in a mature manner, I don't believe you. What I believe is that you are under the age of twenty, and haven't learned what it means to work for a living. I could be wrong, but we'll never know unless you admit it. I'll let others decide if I am correct in my assumption or not.

Back to the point: if an artist works hard to produce music that people want, it is the artist who decides if compensation is due, and it is the artist who decides who gets the right to distribute. Somewhere along the line, you mistakenly believed you have that right. I fail to see how you can justify deciding who has the right to freely copy and distribute a product that you had no part in creating.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: dMacX on May 08, '03 07:39:33PM

I haven?t decided on which side of the issue I support at this
point, but some of your logic is flawed. You say that sharing
coping music is illeagal, which is true. But, there are many
things we do daily that are illeagal and yet we continue to do
them because they are just plain stupid. Do you speed? I speed.
Yet, I could make the arguement that we are threatening
national security because we are causing our police to have to
occupy their time monkeying around with us when they could,
potentially, prevent a terrorist attack. I know that is extreme
and plays on some serious emotions, but it is true.

Now as far as distributing music. If you look at the topo music
that is being downloaded from iTMS, I can make a good
arguement that those same artists are are high up on the
GNUTella network downloads as well. And please don?t tell me
Bono is hurting for the scatch.

Like I metioner before, I still don?t know where I sit on this, but
I can say I don?t feel bad for the artists or the recording industry
execs.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: hayesk on May 08, '03 11:29:40PM

Do I speed, sometimes. If I get caught, I will pay the fine because I
deserve it. But that is a flawed analogy. Revenue from speeding
tickets pays for the cops that patrol for speeders. Because of
speeding tickets, police precincts can afford to hire extra cops - so it's
not like they'd be out finding murderers or anything. They'd be
working at other jobs.

Also, Bono is not hurting for cash, but he is hardly an "average"
musician. But who cares? It's irrelevant. How much money should a
musician make before it's ok to copy their music? How about a record
company? How big do they need to be before it's ok? Who is any of
us to decide it's ok or not? Who are we to decide who has a right to
copy and distribute music made by someone else?

What if everyone copied the music? Who will pay the musicians to
make the music? Who will pay to produce and distribute the albums?



[ Reply to This | # ]
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: dMacX on May 09, '03 07:52:53PM

My point about the cops is we do things that are illegal, that
they really are not issues that are too terribly important. There
obviously are extremes consequences for breaking the law, but
how often do they occur? Not very often. So when you say ?what
if everybody copied mp3s,? I say that will never happen. It is
stupid to think that would happen. Its ridiculous. People are
always going to steal music, but there is always going to be a
market to sell it as well.

My comment about Bono is not irrelevant. I was illustrating my
perception of what bands? music are being taken off the gnutella
network and other services. Bands like The Clarks are bands I
think would be hurt by these free music services. But, people in
EBFE are not going know about The Clarks until they reach a
level of success that is probably significantly above the poverty
line. A level of popularity beyond the city/region they are from.



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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: zarqman on May 08, '03 11:09:51PM
1. You believe every artist is rich. Wrong, only the very successful artists are rich.

agreed.

If everyone acted like you, there would be no musicians or writers and you would have no music to copy.

as a musician and a composer i heartily disagree. i do music because it's in me itching to get out. any commited artist is the same way. if they're able to make a living doing it, great! (wish i could.) but the assumption that we'd have no music (or other art) simply because artists can't make a fulltime living at it is a bit short-sighted.

2. You think serving your music up and if someone copies it, it is not your problem. Wrong, you offered it up to be copied illegally. When you buy the music, you own the medium, and the right to listen to it yourself. You do not have the right to allow others to copy it. That is illegal, whether you like it or not.

you're lumping the legal in with the illegal here. 'serving' up music online for others is illegal, agreed. however, it is legal for anyone in the u.s. to copy something, from an original, for themself. don't believe any of it? check out the audio home recording act (ahra). now, it's odd how the law appears to be written. you cannot make a copy of an original cd and give the copy away. however, you can borrow your friend's original cd, make a copy for yourself, and give the original back. if it's a digitial copy, and you don't own/keep the original, the copy probably does need to be copied onto media for which a copying-tax has been paid. this would be "audio" cdr's, minidiscs, or dat tapes. analog copies, because of the inherent degredation, are also legit. i have heard an argument that mp3s or other lossy compressed formats should be considered like analog copies, but that's definitely stretching the law and has not been tested in court.

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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: Power Factor on May 07, '03 07:22:19PM

This will all change one iTunes is brought to the immoral
majority (Windows Users). Once in that community the piracy of
music originating from the apple music store will dramatically
increase.



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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: chrisgregory on May 08, '03 02:13:23AM

At least most of you guys can use the Apple music store. It's not
available to Australian users as of yet, and given Apple
Australia's history, it probably never will be...

We're still waiting for Sherlock to offer any localised Australian
services. But we still pay the same money for each system
upgrade...



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score one for the bad guys
Authored by: jasonxz on May 08, '03 02:48:53AM

It is surprising that there are so many supporters of your stance; nothing seems quite as dis-heartening as a media source that is timid to publish.

It is understandable to be afraid of the DCMA legislation, but it is a bad set of laws. It may also be melodramatic to compare the DCMA to the House Un-American Committee or McCarthyism, but it seems to have had the similar effect of imposing rule through fear rather than sound judgment.



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Not a "media source"
Authored by: robg on May 08, '03 10:26:11AM
I'm not a "media source." I'm one guy running an OS X website. If you want to get really really technical about it, there's nothing even OS X related about avoiding copy protection -- it has nothing to do with using the system, as anything that runs OS X can play the purchased music perfectly. So on those grounds alone, even without DMCA, I would feel fine with my decision. Removing copy protection from protected music is not an OS X hint.

When you add in DMCA, it's a no brainer. Like it or not, it's the law. Like it or not, when you publish things that break the law, it only takes one person's comment to start a wave of troubles. Witness the recent college kids settlement -- $12,000 each, and all they were doing was running a SEARCH ENGINE that found music and any other SMB shared files. Given that I've invested roughly 4,000 hours of my life over the last three years in macosxhints, I have absolutely no interest in destroying what I've worked hard to create by posting ridiculously easy instructions that can be found in roughly 25,000 spots on the web already.

Sorry if you feel that way, but I'm very comfortable with my decision.

-rob.

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Hint that (possibly, maybe, who knows) violates the DMCA
Authored by: calroth on May 08, '03 04:33:25AM
Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: Greenfruit on May 08, '03 06:41:19AM

completely agree here to, well done.

---
http://www.greenfruit.net/ - mysite | http://www.somefoolwitha.com/ - blog
"Coming up, I'll tell you exactly what to think." Chris Morris, Brass Eye
-iBook/G4



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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: hayesk on May 08, '03 11:20:55PM

If people didn't pay for music, you are right, some would still make
music because they like it. But who would press the CDs, market and
distribute them? You'd be left with only locally produced music. I
don't have anything against local musicians, but there's a lot more
music out there that costs money to promote and distribute.

Also, I was not referring to copying one's own music. I thought that
was implied. I'm referring to Kazaa and other file sharing software. I
am well aware of fair use rights.



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Regarding hints on evading iTunes Store copy protection
Authored by: newbish on May 09, '03 09:07:33PM
I'm behind you 100% on this one. My attitude towards trying to circumvent the DRM on the file is: "Why bother?" I paid a fair price for the songs I'm listening to, and I can play and listen to them however and wherever I wish.

For those who wish to reveal the processes to circumvent the DRM, please take it to a different forum. We'd like to protect this forum.

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