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Test web pages for color dependence Web Browsers

One of the core principles of access for people with disabilities is that information should be understood even if the user can't see color.

Mac-using Web developers can test their pages for color dependence by viewing pages in grayscale. Here's how you do that in Mac OS X:

  1. Open System Preferences and select the Universal Access panel
  2. Select the Seeing tab.
  3. Click on "Set Display to Grayscale." Ta da!
  4. View the pages in Safari or another browser. Change back by repeating these same steps to reset the display.

This technique can also be used by application developers to ensure their apps meet Apple's Human Interface guidelines for color dependence. The Universal Access settings are actually quite useful beyond simply enabling access by people with disabilities.

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Test web pages for color dependence
Authored by: runoffgroove on May 05, '03 10:53:12AM

To successfully switch to grayscale, I first needed to uncheck "Show modes recommended by display" and then set the number of colors to 256, which is normally unavailable (grayed-out).

Without doing so, the display would only briefly switch to grayscale then would be in what looked like 256 colors.

I'm using an eMac with 10.2 (original Jag).



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Test web pages for color dependence
Authored by: Kynn on May 05, '03 03:01:07PM

Oh, good point. It is probably dependent on what Mac OS X
thinks your monitor can do. Good catch, thanks.

--Kynn

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http://www.maccessibility.com/



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Test web pages for color dependence
Authored by: leejoramo on May 05, '03 12:11:53PM
Great hint. I have used this feature of Mac OS for years and years. Not being able to switch to gray scale was one of the few reasons that I use to boot into Mac OS 9. Thankfully, Apple added the ablity to change to gray scale with OS X 10.2. I wish that this feature was availble via the Displays panel as well, but that is a small nit to pick.

Lee Joramo

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X-Proof
Authored by: Paul Burney on May 05, '03 03:32:39PM
X-Proof by Colorfield Digital Media allows you to view a section of your screen as it would be seen by someone with one of three kinds of colorblindness. It also lets you simulate windows gamma, sRGB and a few other screen color translation issues.

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X-Proof
Authored by: Kynn on May 06, '03 12:24:19AM

A broken HTML comment on that page makes it impossible to find the download link -- at least in this version of Safari (v73). Here's the link to the download page:

Download an evaluation of X-Proof

--Kynn

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http://www.maccessibility.com/

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