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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail Apps
More often than not, if you find an offending piece of spam in Mail.app, it is quite obvious before it's even opened. Usually, the subject or the sender name is a dead giveaway. Normally, you would click on the email and then on the Junk icon. This changes the email's status to junk and removes it in the predetermined way.

However, clicking on the email automatically opens it, and thus the offending material becomes apparent. Worse yet, if it's in HTML, it notfies the sender that it arrived at a valid email address. So instead of clicking, just click and hold on the email, and immediately drag it to the Junk mailbox. Go check your Junk mailbox, and you will see that the offending piece of email is now marked as junk and remains unopened.
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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail | 12 comments | Create New Account
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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: Connie on Apr 18, '03 10:27:09AM

There is another way to not open email if you suspect it is
objectionable. Just drag the bar below the email all the way
down to the bottom and it cannot be opened unless you click on
the specific email twice. You are always safe from junk all the
time then.
Connie



[ Reply to This | # ]
Not necessarily...
Authored by: notmatt on Apr 18, '03 11:21:23AM

While I'd like to think Apple was smart enough to catch this, I can't confirm it. That woeful piece of virus-spreading gunk, Microsoft Outlook, would still open a message even if the preview pane had been dragged small enough to be invisible; you had to actually turn it off to change it.

Even if Apple didn't fall into that trap, if you happen to drag your preview pane down to 1 pixel, you have the appearence, but not the effect, of safety in this regard. It's much safer to turn off HTML rendering in mail altogether.



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Preview Pane
Authored by: bigdog on Apr 18, '03 11:53:00AM

You can turn that preview pane off completely by double-clicking the divider line. Mail.app became better the day I decided to do that. No more rendering HTML emails I only want to delete.

---
also, dental



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Preview Pane
Authored by: mahakali on Apr 18, '03 09:48:46PM
Or use this applescript and YoupiKey (now iKey) or Quickeys or other tool that can run scripts using keyboard shortcut:
tell application "Mail"
set msgViewer to front message viewer
if (the preview pane is visible of msgViewer) is in {true} then
tell msgViewer to set properties to {preview pane is 
visible:false}
else
tell msgViewer to set properties to {preview pane is 
visible:true}
end if
end tell


[ Reply to This | # ]
Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: alajuela on Apr 18, '03 10:41:25AM

Uh, why not just click the Junk mail icon in the toolbar?



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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: alajuela on Apr 18, '03 10:46:02AM

Sorry, I jumped to the keyboard too fast. I now better
understand what you meant by "opening it," i.e., that it shows
in the Preview pane.

My comment missed your point and I am sorry. But here is the
one problem with either approach mentioned here: if you do
these things in an effort to avoid even viewing a piece of junk,
then you deprive the filter of the ability to learn what is junk. I
have found it invaluable when some junk arrives to turn Junk
back into Training mode, and then show it what I don't like.



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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: johnseal on Apr 18, '03 10:57:22AM

Does "showing the Junk mail filter what you don't like" require first opening the item, then marking it as junk? Or is just marking it as junk, without opening it, sufficient to show it what you consider junk?

---
Do quantum pirates make you walk the Planck?



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Assign junk mail status without opening a message in Mail
Authored by: Han Solo on Apr 18, '03 11:07:25AM
Mail.app only updates its filter in training mode? Not according to Apple (Knowledge Base article #86190, updated 3/4/03):
In automatic mode, Mail will move messages to the Junk mailbox so they are out of your way and you can easily screen them. You should periodically review the messages in the Junk mailbox to make sure messages you care about are not being identified as junk. If a message is wrongly classified, click the Not Junk button. You should also periodically delete junk messages. Correcting misidentified messages and deleting junk messages improves Mail's ability to correctly detect junk mail.
So, no, you need not switch back to training mode to "teach" Mail.app about junk, and no, you need not view the message -- it need only be selected. Add the "Junk" button to the Toolbar of your Viewer Window (if it is not there already), and click that instead of viewing the message (using the above methods, such as pulling down the horizontal split window bar to the bottom of the Viewer Window to disable message viewing). See also KB article #107401. HTH.

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The filter is ALWAYS learning
Authored by: notmatt on Apr 18, '03 11:17:35AM

The junk email filter always 'learns' according to manual junk/not junk assignments, which is nice (do a quick search of the spam articles in the Apple KB for confirmation).

While I can't say for sure, it seems likely that dragging messages to the junk box will do the same; when they're dragged in, they're assigned junk status automatically.

As for the difference between automatic and training modes, if I had to guess, I'd assume that training mode used ALL mail, both automatically-assigned and manually to train on, while automatic mode used only the manually-assigned messages to alter the filter model. Might also be less sophisticated, and simply change a couple of constants.



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The filter is ALWAYS learning
Authored by: aranor on Apr 18, '03 12:51:53PM

From what I understand, Training mode is just like Automatic mode, except that instead of moving messages to the junk mailbox, it simply colors them tan. This way you can train the junk mail filter to act appropriately before having it auto-move stuff to the Junk mail folder.

If you'll notice, the junk mail filter settings (i.e. Training vs. Automatic) simply change a rule in Mail.app's rules list.



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The filter is ALWAYS learning
Authored by: notmatt on Apr 18, '03 01:43:56PM
If you'll notice, the junk mail filter settings (i.e. Training vs. Automatic) simply change a rule in Mail.app's rules list.

Yeah, but it's the "this message is junk mail" bit where all the magic happens, and anything could be going on behind the scenes.

What makes me think there IS something is that training sets for latent semantic analysis are generally a LOT bigger than the number of mails the typical person will click on as "junk" or "not junk" before turning it to automatic. Training with that level of supervision is also notoriously slow, and even though Apple gives a pretty good default model, it seems like you'd need something more intensive at first. Similarly, you would actually want to stop intensive training at some point, or it becomes very hard to adapt to 'new' junk mail. All this makes me think that there's something else going on behind the scenes besides switching what happens to the positive results.

I tried searches on google and citeseer, but couldn't find anything. I'm getting more and more curious.



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One other way to do it
Authored by: Dephex Twin on Apr 18, '03 02:14:59PM

I don't get all that much spam, and as a result I leave things in
training mode, so I can't just drag to the junk mail folder.
Besides disabling the preview pane in some way, another way to
get around this problem of not wanting to view the email is to
highlight a piece of non-spam mail, then cmd-click on the soon-
to-be-junk mail (so now you have two selected). Then click the
"set to junk mail button". Now select the non-spam by itself,
and take away its junk mail label. This leaves you with the
spam designated as junk mail, and it was never viewed since the
preview pane displays nothing for multiple email selections.

Also, if you have multiple spams to get rid of at once, you can
select one piece of non-junk and then all the other spams
together and it won't take any longer than doing it with one
piece of spam.

Just throwing that out there as an alternative.

---
\"Alcohol: the cause of-- and solution to-- all of life\'s problems.\"
--- Homer Simpson



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