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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths System
I just found out that you can use paths in the Save dialog box to navigate to hidden directories. Say you just want a quick look at something, a PDF, so you want to save it to /tmp. In the Save box, type /tmp as the filename, hit enter (in some cases my Save button even changed to Go), and you are sent to that directory.

You can also write the full path, like /tmp/a.pdf.

This works in open dialogs boxes too, as many might have figured out. The directories saved to are also visible next time you open a save dialog - presumably until you relogin.

[robg adds: I had been aware that in Open dialog boxes you could type in a path, as the input box there is labeled "Go:". But in Save dialogs, the input box is simply "Save As" and you would think it only accepts a filename ... but as the hint points out, you can actually type a path there as well! I tested this in a few Cocoa and Carbon apps, and it seems to work perfectly in all of them. The only mild trick is that you can't really use /Volumes to jump to the top of your hard drive stack (I get a scary warning about "/" not existing and would I like to create it -- I said "no thanks!"). Instead, jump directly to any drive by typing /Name_of_drive. This hint saves a lot of mouse work scrolling around in the save dialog boxes; no more reaching for the mouse to get from my Desktop to my backup drive, now I just have to type a few characters!]
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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths | 12 comments | Create New Account
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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths
Authored by: thebimbo on Apr 11, '03 10:52:29AM

It's actually been like this since the NeXT days but I'd forgotten about this so happy to see the hint; of course you can use / but also ~ (home) here AND can move to a location instead i.e.:
~ and enter/return takes you to home folder
/ and enter/return takes you to startup disk (root)
nameoffolder and return takes you into that folder (saves scrolling).
I prefer using the tab and cursor keys to navigate down a folder tree...

Enjoy... thebimbo

---
=mak



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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths
Authored by: splattertrousers on Apr 11, '03 11:26:32AM

Too bad filename completion doesn't work.



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Sure it does!
Authored by: sabi on Apr 11, '03 03:56:48PM

In Cocoa apps only, but you can complete with the F2 key.

If that doesn't work, you may need to add this to ~/Library/KeyBindings/DefaultKeyBinding.plist:

"\UF705" = "complete:"; /* F2 */



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Whaaa?
Authored by: CoolerQ on Apr 11, '03 04:24:58PM

I don't have a KeyBindings in any of my Library folders, nor do I have a DefaultKeyBindings.plist anywhere on my hard drive. Is there some place I can find it, or should I just make a new file with that line in it?



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Whaaa?
Authored by: JohnnyMnemonic on Apr 11, '03 07:30:22PM

I didn't have it either. Make a new file with that line in it in the folder indicated; log out. Works for me.

On a related note, what characters are legal instead of F2? Ideally, I could use some kind of "cmd" tab, to be more consistent with the terminal operation.



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Re: Sure it does!
Authored by: corvus on Apr 12, '03 10:09:53AM

Or maybe it's DefaultKeyBinding.dict? A google search turns that up
often, but not much shows up for DefaultKeyBinding.plist.

Or maybe they both work?

If you have dev tools installed, see:

open ./Documentation/Cocoa/TasksAndConcepts/
ProgrammingTopics/BasicEventHandling/Tasks/
TextDefaultsAndBindings.html



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Re: Sure it does!
Authored by: sabi on Apr 14, '03 04:21:14PM

Sorry, I meant .dict not .plist.

Sigh...



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path = filename
Authored by: anonmac on Apr 11, '03 02:28:49PM

i think you guys are overlooking the fact that in unix, the filename IS part of the path.

i.e.
/usr/bin/top
is not the same as
/top
while both files may be 'called' top, the only way to make sure the correct one is used, is to specify the directory it is in. (alternatively, making the path to the file a part of YOUR PATH ( 'echo $PATH') could suffice, but that could always be modded. too offtopic anyway.)

so, the tip makes complete sense from that context.



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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths
Authored by: mervTormel on Apr 11, '03 06:11:42PM

entering /Volumes does pop up an ominous dialog, but entering /volumes (lowercase Vee) takes you there :D



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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths
Authored by: rlinsurf on Apr 11, '03 07:01:20PM

Okay...as a UNIX Newbie...I've tried /Volumes and /volumes. My other hard drive is called Macintosh HD from the old days -- there's a space. So I've also tried: /Macintosh HD, /"Macintosh HD", and /Macintosh_HD (although I don't see how adding an _ to a name that doesn't already have it would work?

Anyway, for the /volume commands, I get Permission denied. Even though I have sudo -s'd in:

[64:~] root# /volumes
/volumes: Permission denied.

And I really don't want to have to log out and then login again as root if possible.

For the name commands I get:

[64:~] root# /"Macintosh HD"
/Macintosh HD: Command not found.

So far, I have not been able to access any other drives.

---
Jeffrey



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Terminal basics
Authored by: englabenny on Apr 11, '03 07:45:27PM
[This hint does not apply to terminal operations] when you type [64:~] root# /volumes, you are actually trying to execute the path, in this case a nonexsitant such. Try % cd /Volumes instead. As for typing spaces, you can escape them by putting a \ before them, or enclose the whole of the path in qoutation marks. Use: % cd /Volumes/Macintosh\ HD or % cd "/Volumes/Macintosh HD"

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Navigate save dialog boxes by typing filesystem paths
Authored by: gretchin on Apr 11, '03 10:40:40PM

the scary warning works in your favour if you want to create a whole slew of new folders. whee!

gl.



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