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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs Desktop
Having just bought a copy of Massive Attack's new CD, I eagerly placed it into my Mac to listen to it. No go. Copy controlled. No problem if you're on a PC - you can fire up the Windows Media Player that's included on the CD. Shame they didn't consider Mac users also buy CD's.

I found that if you get info for the first track on the CD in iTunes, and choose a start time of 0:10 (10 seconds into the first track) it will then happily rip the whole CD. I can live with missing the first ten seconds of a copy controlled CD if it means I don't have to be swapping CD's in and out of my mac if I want to listen to my legally purchased music as I work. That'll teach them for ignoring Mac users!
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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: wannesdaemen on Feb 18, '03 10:52:45AM
I bought the same cd last week and also noticed the copy-control thing. I have a very cheap mp3-cd-player that won't play most of them protected discies, but will play every cd-r imaginable.
I found that, with roxio toast, when you try to copy a cd that has the sort of copy control on it that massive attacks last one has (which shows two folders/sessions in the finder, one with the tracks, and one with the control .exe shit), it only copies the session with the tracks on it. The copy i made with roxio is perfectly playable on every cd-player in the house, and it's free from copy control.


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Er, no
Authored by: gidds on Feb 18, '03 10:53:00AM
What will teach them not to issue crippled CDs is if you return the CD to where you bought it, and complain that you can't play it.  Otherwise, next time it might not just be the first ten seconds...

---

Andy/

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Er, no
Authored by: dario on Mar 19, '03 04:53:45PM

WELL I CONFIRM TO ANYONE CAN HEAR THAT COPY CONTROLLED CAN BE EASILY DEFEATED WITH "EASY CD-DA EXTRACTOR" USING ANY PLEXTOR READER! :)

HAVE FUN AND SHARE THE MUSIC U LIKE!

DADO



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Thanks for the warning
Authored by: deleted_user18 on Feb 18, '03 10:56:55AM

I was about to buy the new Massive CD :-(



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: sn00py on Feb 18, '03 11:14:35AM

F*** that!!!
Return it for a refund! The more of us who do this, the more (perhaps) they might get the message that this crap is unacceptable! (In the meantime, rip it anyway so you can continue to listen to it while you're waiting for them to release a non-broken version :)

Then again, are you saying the first 10 seconds of the first song are cut off? Call me nitpicky and/or a purist, but to me that's not even acceptable.

Oh by the way, what you just described is a workaround against an access control device. You can expect the FBI to break down your door and arrest you.

...Oh yes, this also means iTunes itself is a circumvention device. So 5 million people ought to be put in jail right now for breaking the law, including all employees and shareholders of Apple Computer, Inc. Should be sent down to Guantanamo Bay in Cuba with the rest of the terrorists and beaten to a pulp, with no attorney privileges, no trial.......

I'm sorry for this extended rant that trailed off into something completely off-topic, but this PISSES me OFF to no end!!



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Tape and Marker trick
Authored by: thoughts on Feb 18, '03 11:22:31AM

I read about this a long time ago, tried it, and it works for me.

If you look at the bottom of your CD, you can see that about half a centimeter from the CD's outside edge, there is what appears to be "session seperation line." Everything after that line is your normal audio CD, everything before that, up to the edge of the CD, is the "copy protection."

Solution? Take a bit of scotch tape, colour it black, and stick it so it reaches from the outside edge of the CD, right up to where the copy protection ends and the 'normal' part of the CD begins. It can and should only be a tiny piece - don't need to tape the *whole* copy protection area away ;p

Now, when you put your CD into your drive, it will automically skip the copy porotection, and mount properly.

For victory! :)



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Tape and Marker trick
Authored by: cudbany1 on Jan 16, '04 11:34:33PM

Thanks for the tip! It worked perfectly (on the first try) with Pet Shop Boys - Disco 3 & The Be Good Tanyas - Chinatown using Winamp on my PC. Yeah, I'm not a Mac user; a Google of "copy controlled" lead me to this site.

Kudos!!



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Strike a real blow for fair use: Return It.
Authored by: notmatt on Feb 18, '03 11:34:58AM
I have to agree with the other people - return the CD complaining you can't play it. This will either: a) encourage them to let Mac users play the discs, or b) encourage them to drop the whole miserable implementation of copy-protected CDs.

Now, I don't feel any particular need to defend the idea of fair use to the inevitable rabble-rouser who will claim we just all want something for free, and how artists have a right to protect their works, and so forth and so on. Instead, I'll just preemptively direct you to the relevent part of the EFF's site.

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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: inajar on Feb 18, '03 11:49:07AM

That's weird, I too bought the new Massive Attack CD last week and the first thing I did was rip it to iTunes so I could listen to it on my iPod. And I didn't have any problems doing that. I can see the session seperation on my CD, but I only get the audio session when I put it into my Mac.

One of the other posters was right, your "workaround" doesn't really show the record company anything other than how to make the copy-protection better next time. The way to get the record companies to stop doing this is to return the disc as unusable, most of the large chain stores now have policies in place to accept returns of copy protected CDs without making you just exchange it for another copy of that CD. I know that's what I would have done if the new Massive Attack disc hadn't worked on my computer.

-tim



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: chabig on Feb 18, '03 12:01:19PM

Who cares if they make you exchange it for another copy of the same CD? Open the new one, return it. And so on, and so on, and so on...



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Return it...
Authored by: mholve on Feb 18, '03 11:52:23AM

I wouldn't put up with that.

---
--
Everything Mac - http://everythingmac.org



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What market are you in?
Authored by: smv on Feb 18, '03 11:58:10AM

I'm in the Dallas area and the copy I purchased ripped flawlessly in iTunes. I'd be interested to learn which areas have the copy-protection.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: frogmella on Feb 18, '03 11:59:25AM

Of course, if a significant number of people don't buy CDs with copy protection, the music industry will just blame the drop in sales on music piracy, and lobby even harder for stronger laws against fair use.

Incidentally, I always get my CDs (here in the UK) by mail order from abroad, and they're usually something like 35% cheaper than the High Street, and have (so far) not included copy protection where their UK equivalents have done so. For example, the new Massive Attack is £8.99 at cd-wow versus £13.99 at HMV.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: notmatt on Feb 18, '03 07:04:58PM
...if a significant number of people don't buy CDs with copy protection, the music industry will just blame the drop in sales on music piracy...

This is why returning them is a good idea - the music store knows they've actually lost a sale because of the protection. This, in effect, puts the retail side of the industry firmly on the side of the consumer. Divide and conquer.

Personally, I'd like to see the industry admit that they shot themselves in the foot. They've dropped new title issues by something like a cumulative 33% since 1999, and sales have only dropped by about 15% in the same timeframe. Personally, that sounds like demand is increasing, or at the very worst, remaining steady.

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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: uli on Feb 18, '03 12:50:37PM

I urge everyone to boycott any artist(s) that allows this kind of implementation on their CD's. I really enjoy the music of Massive Attack, (purchased their last two albums,) but I will not purchase ANY new CD if I cannot play it on my Mac.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: david-bo on Feb 22, '03 06:10:12PM
Remember to post a note about this in the forums on the official Massive Attack web. I have already done it.

http://www.massiveattack.co.uk

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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: twenex on Feb 18, '03 02:15:07PM
How odd. I put it in and ripped it in my mac (G4 with DVD player) with no problem. Today, however, I put the disk in and had the copy protection problem, removed it and put it in again and it worked fine. Whatever copy protection there is obviously doesn't work too well. Perhaps try it a few more times before giving up.
What an annoyance, though, and I certainly agree with those who are returning the disk.

Does anyone know if DVD players are less or more tolerant to this type of copy protection than other drives (CDs, CDRs, DVD-Rs, etc). Please post your config if you have a comment regarding if this works or not!

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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: robarmo on Feb 18, '03 05:04:32PM

The SuperDrive Firmware update description mentions something about
also fixing problems with copy protected CDs, so maybe your onto
something about some Macs not being affected, as non-SuperDrive
systems would lack this updated software.

Also, its not just Macs that these CDs don`t work with. There have been
many reports of these discs not working with portable and in-car players.
These discs do not meet the original Audio CD specification, and
therefore shouldn`t be allowed to use the Compact Disc logo.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: neil_edwards on Feb 19, '03 06:50:52PM

i bought this protected cd too, after itunes failed to rip it and a PC did too, i put it back in my mac, 2 session mounted, the Audio CD one had aifs on it the other the pc copy-protection software. I just copied the aifs and ripped it from them, no problems



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: salimma on Feb 19, '03 09:46:42PM

Funny. I have this made-in-California Persian CD by Omid that would play but not rip in any DVD or CD player, and on a recording drive (tried on CD-RW, DVD/CD-RW and DVD-R/CD-RW) would do the following:

- turns Windows into molasses until you have the good sense to eject
- nothing happens in Linux
- iTunes just eject the CD

Of course, returning the CD is also much harder since I imported it :(. Bummer. No, it did not have the CD logo anywhere either. Any guess how long it will be before sale of discmans pick up again? (analog line-out -> computer line-in).

Incidentally, can anyone recommend a decent free/cheap shareware recording app? I'm using Audacity but it records nothing when I connect an audio cable from my stereo to the mic input. If I set the recording device to the internal microphone Audacity goes mad and had to be killed :(

- Michel

---
- Michel



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: pfig on Feb 18, '03 03:15:42PM

saturday morning i climbed out of bed to buy the new ma cd, and by chance i saw the fine print on the back cover while i was listening to it (luck again, there was a listening stand with the cd loaded).

i didn't buy it, because besides the mac i also run linux, and this kind of crap really pisses me off. i thought about buying it, getting out of the store and go back to return it, but since it states that it is only compatible with cd/dvd players and windows pc they would use that argument, and i didn't feel like starting the day with a fight with some braindead beancounter.

i can't find their official site to complain about these, anyone?

cheers,

pedro (lisbon, portugal)



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: gene_mc on Feb 18, '03 06:19:45PM

Avex Japan is pulling this same crap. The one Avex uses is the Midbar tech cactus shield. The CD does not in fact have the official compact disc logo anywhere on the disc itself or the package (The disc I have in question is Cyber Trance Presents Ayu Trance 2) I put it into my new PB 12" (10.2.4 installed) and it mounted and imported just fine. The extra track with the copy control dreck showed on my desktop but it didn't harm anything.

You can read about it here:
http://www.avexnet.or.jp/cccd/ (need babelfish unless you can read japanese)
and here:
http://www.avex.co.jp/e_site/press/2002/press020228.html

Copy control can never work unless the hardware and software makers are complicit. If the record companies want to try to use this copy control cd tech, I say let them if they think it will actually do anything. What worries me more is the purchasing of our legislators. (anyone remember all the DRM crap they are trying to get integrated into the ATAPI spec?) Microsoft is also gung-ho on this stuff because they want to be a distribution channel, and need a secure means to do it.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: Chris Haynes on Feb 18, '03 08:00:53PM

The phrase "CD" means Compact Disc and is a standard. When a manufacturer distributes a disc that does not conform to these standards, that disc cannot be called a "CD" (to mean Compact Disc). In other words, you are perfectly within your rights to return the disc to the shop and demand your money back, since the shop sold you something they said was a CD and actually isn't. I read this in a news article somewhere.

Now for my rant... These record companies need to realise that not just Windows users buy CDs and not all Windows users use WMP. I use a Mac and I buy CDs. I am allowed by law to make one copy of anything I buy in case the original gets destroyed. It's called the Fair Use policy. I have every right to copy my CD. Since I can't realistically listen to two copies simultaneously, they are infringing my rights to Fair Use.

I will no longer buy an audio disc that I cannot copy for MY OWN PERSONAL USE. And Massive Attack should be hit hard for allowing their record company to do this.

---
darkpaw



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: Ezekiel on Feb 19, '03 01:12:48AM

I can't believe that noone has mentioned the worst thing about copy protected CD's: The fact that the quality of sound is greatly reduced. No use buying a CD if it doesn't have perfect sound quality. Only reason for most people not to break the law and copy MP3's is that a CD has much better sound after all.

The record industry is facing it's greatest threat yet, and I sincerily hope that it will fall and crumble to dust.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: austxjohn on Feb 19, '03 03:18:55AM

Has anyone run into copy protection that causes the mp3 files to "skip" or give other errors? I've got a couple new CD's that sound ok in a CD player but will not rip without flaws. One of these CD's is Diana Krall's "Live in Paris" on Verve Records a Universal Music Company. I'd love to find a way around this since I load all my music on my iPod and the CD's pretty much collect dust on my shelf now.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: chris_on_hints on Apr 20, '05 08:04:50AM

this (i think) is caused by the kind of copy protection mentioned above by Ezekiel.

most people on this hint are talking about copy protection that stops a computer from loading a CD ("mounting" it).

a different copy protection system is where the record company purposefully put errors on the CD (this is the "reduced quality" that Ezekiel referred to). These errors are small, and a CD player in a HIFI system will just ignore them and fill in the blanks.

the CD drive in a computer (because its main job is working with Data files, which cannot afford to have errors in) is tripped up by these errors as it tries to 'fix' them.

I think this might be what is causing the mistakes in your mp3's - the CD drive is reading the 'CD' so fast that it cant fix the errors and they result in errors in the mp3.

Im no expert - and could be wildly wrong on this, but this is the rumour I have heard. I have also heard of the way around this kind of protection (i think it was on the last Micheal Jackson album). Put the CD into a HIFI cd player which has a digital output and press play. Connect the digital output (or even analogue if you are happy to lose a bit of quality) to a CD-recorder (hifi) or to a computer with a digital input. Hey-presto! Your hifi CD player fixes the errors, and provides your recorder with perfect digital sound....



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Works for me
Authored by: Salamander on Feb 19, '03 07:35:44AM

Powerbook 800, 10.2.4, DVD/CDRW (not SuperDrive)

This Massive Attack CD came from Fopp in Cambridge, UK. It doesn't have the Compact Disc Digital Audio logo, but many CDs don't these days. It also doesn't have the warning about only playing on PCs that someone mentioned. It does however have the extra session at the edge of the disc.

Ripped no probs, thankfully. I agree with the sentiment here. I own over 300 CDs, and they are all ripped to my home server to allow me to access them from playlists any way I like. I also make copies of some of them to play in the car and get scratched. This is fair use as far as I'm concerned, the way it should be. The artist gets their money and I get to listen to their music any way I like.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: Anonymous on Feb 19, '03 08:28:45AM

You can get Windows Media Player for Mac from many sites, including Microsoft's. I run OSX 10.2.4 and my CD player allows me to copy legally purchased CD's with no problems. I can even convert the songs to MP3 in iTunes and copy them to a new CD.



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check the sessions!
Authored by: neil_edwards on Feb 19, '03 06:53:09PM

i bought this protected cd too, after itunes failed to rip it and a PC did too, i put it back in my mac, 2 session mounted, the Audio CD one had aifs on it the other the pc copy-protection software. I just copied the aifs and ripped it from them, no problems



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check the sessions!
Authored by: jkinley on Aug 28, '03 11:22:42PM

I tried to copy the Aifs to my hard drive and then rip them to AAC, but it didn't work. Many of the tracks had noises, pops, and skips. I am using OS X 10.2 on a PB G3. I think I'll probably take the CD back unless I can get it to work on my Mac. Especially since this is all I use to listen to my CD collection.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: pillowhead on Feb 19, '03 10:40:09PM

i got mine the day it came out in Boston, MA and mine works perfectly on my mac running 10.2.4.
i hadn't eve heard about this until now...
kookie



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Missing: 1 DMCA violation. If found...
Authored by: calroth on Feb 20, '03 03:37:13AM

Congratulations, you've just violated the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Well, possibly. I am not a lawyer, so if anybody wants to clarify, go ahead.

For the record, I don't approve of this law, I agree with the sentiments of most people here, I don't download MP3 files, I haven't ripped a CD for months, and I'm in Australia. (This is just due disclosure.)



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Missing: 1 DMCA violation. If found...
Authored by: chris_on_hints on Apr 20, '05 08:09:16AM

the DMCA stinks:

it doesnt protect the customer

it doesnt protect the artist

it doesnt stop people copying the music

I would prefer to see artists cutting out the record companies, and signing contracts with the digital download sites (iTunes & the others)
Then the artist would get a decent slice of the action, and we would all get the music in a fair way (ie on your mac(s), on a CD and on your iPod)



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: AMacAddict on Feb 20, '03 10:24:57AM

I purchased Ace of Base: Da Capo, and after I had ripped the music and was listening on myPod, I noticed the "Copy Protected not playable on a PC" logo on the back. After I was finished laughing, I noticed that indeed my Mac had mounted both the "COPYXA" and aif partitions. While I agree with the "return copy protected CDs" theme, I figure let them continue to use protection methods that don't work for as long as we can. When I get a CD that won't work, I'll take it back.



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One more solution
Authored by: imperium on Feb 20, '03 03:41:38PM
You could also use Audio Hijack to save an aiff stream from the Mac version of Windows Media Player. This nifty piece of software also 'hijacks' Realplayer audio streams.. but I agree that simply returning the disc is the best thing. Dammit, I regard listening to music I've bought on my iPod as absolutely fair use..

imperium

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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: fpp on Dec 27, '03 07:30:22AM

I think I found out some interesting things about this kind of copy protection. I just got such a CD (salut salon!, probably only available in Germany) and could not copy the last track. Skipping the frist 10 seconds of this track helped well but I was not satisfied with this. Trying to copy the track with Toast stopped at exactely 9.0 seconds. I kept this fragment and looked for the lowest possible start to copy the rest of the song (with iTunes). I could go as low as 9,52 seconds so app. half a second is missing. I merged the two fragments with QuickTime Player.

I still was not satisfied. I have an old Mac 7500 with OS 8.6 around. This Mac could not even mount the audio CD, but I have Astarte CD Copy and with this software I could copy the problematic track immediately. So this kind of copy protection seams to depend on the firmware of the drive.



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: jonaa on Mar 06, '04 07:03:28AM

try using ISO buster to extract the tracks from the CP CD
this is a good site

http://www.cdrinfo.com/Sections/Articles/Specific.asp?ArticleHeadline=Cactus+Data+Shield+200&index=3



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: walterchillum on Apr 19, '05 11:27:26AM

There's a couple of ways of overcoming this copy controlled rubbish. First I'm from A'stralia and there are different types of copy control. In the U.S. copy control is relatively newnot so in this country. Grrr!!!

As stated Audio Hijack is a s'ware alternative and I've had sound engineers recommend it.

Also there is the hardware option. Both my wife and myself are ex music industry so we've got a large vinyl collection that needs to be digitised.

If you're going down this path get a USB preamp (I use a Terratec Producer 26 and it gives great sound quality). I'd give Griffin products a miss as they're merely adequate.

Purchase Analogue Ripper which is cheap as anything. Then get a cd player (a good discman will do) and connect it the Line In sockets on the Preamp. Play that bastard (not a swear word in OZ) cd and presto no copy protection. The cd player won't pick up the copy controlled rubbish. Analogue Ripper will just read a totally clean signal.

So much for copy control. This latter approach may be a bit expensive but I'd be prepared to say that NO copy control will fool this option.

Walter Chillum



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Ripping legally purchased copy controlled audio CDs
Authored by: chris_on_hints on Apr 20, '05 08:12:19AM

even better - see my post above...

... use the digital output from a CD player and record it digitally onto a DAT player, hifi CD burner or to a computer with a suitable digital input...



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