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Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting System
Three methods to prevent your machine from booting OS 9...

Method One - Using Disk Utility:
Format the hard drive without OS 9 Drivers.

Method Two - Using diskutil from command line:
Leave out the <OS9Drivers> option! For example:
diskutil partitionDisk <Device Node> <numberOfPartitions> \
  <bootable> HFS+ Disk1 <size>G HFS+ Disk2 <size>G ...
where <DeviceNode> = /dev/disk0, /dev/disk1, etc [robg adds: Line break added for readability]. To get more info type sudo diskutil partitionDisk.

[robg adds: The remainder of the article details a third method for removing the OS 9 driver partition from an existing drive. This is not for the faint of heart, and the making an error would probably lead to a pretty bad outcome. In addition, I'm not 100% positive why you would wish to prevent OS 9 booting on a machine that is capable of doing so (security reasons?). But as my main role here is to provide information for those who may wish to know, here you go. Consider yourself warned before proceeding! Have you hugged your backup today?!]

Method Three - Using pdisk on already formatted, partitioned disk to delete OS 9 driver partitions.

step 1:
Unmount all volumes associated with the device to be edited

step 2:
Edit the partition map deleting Apple Driver and Apple Patches partitons. In the terminal, type sudo pdisk and use the following sample to help guide the process:
Top level command (? for help):e (type e and hit return)
Name of device:/dev/disk0 (type device and hit return)
Command (? for help):p (type p and hit return)
(sample output)
/dev/disk0  map block size=512
   #:                 type name                 length   base     ( size )
   1:  Apple_partition_map Apple                    63 @ 1       
   2:       Apple_Driver43*Macintosh                56 @ 64      
   3:       Apple_Driver43*Macintosh                56 @ 120     
   4:     Apple_Driver_ATA*Macintosh                56 @ 176     
   5:     Apple_Driver_ATA*Macintosh                56 @ 232     
   6:       Apple_FWDriver Macintosh               512 @ 288     
   7:   Apple_Driver_IOKit Macintosh               512 @ 800     
   8:        Apple_Patches Patch Partition         512 @ 1312    
   9:            Apple_HFS PBG4 1             17251680 @ 1824     (  8.2G)
  10:            Apple_HFS PBG4 2             29627888 @ 17253504 ( 14.1G)
  11:            Apple_HFS OSX                29627888 @ 46881392 ( 14.1G)
  12:            Apple_HFS Classic            17249832 @ 76509280 (  8.2G)
  13:           Apple_Free                           0+@ 93759112

Device block size=512, Number of Blocks=93759120
DeviceType=0x0, DeviceId=0x0
Drivers-
1: @ 64 for 23, type=0x1
2: @ 120 for 36, type=0xffff
3: @ 176 for 21, type=0x701
4: @ 232 for 34, type=0xf8ff

Command (? for help): d (type d and hit return)
Partition Number: 2 (type 2 and hit return)
are you sure you want to delete this driver> [n/y]: y (type y and hit return)

Command (? for help): d (type d and hit return)
Partition Number: 3 (type 3 and hit return)
are you sure you want to delete this driver> [n/y]: y (type y and hit return)
Repeat the d command with partition 3 six times. This is because driver partitions will actually get deleted and consolidated into a single free partition at partition 2. In other words the number of partitions will be changed each time partition is deleted. Use the p command each time to get a new list of partitions)
Command (? for help):p (type p and hit return)
(Verify that your partiton table looks something like this:)
/dev/disk0  map block size=512
   #:                 type name                 length   base     ( size )
   1:  Apple_partition_map Apple                    63 @ 1       
   2:             Apple_Free Extra                  1760 @ 64      
   3:            Apple_HFS PBG4 1             17251680 @ 1824     (  8.2G)
   4:            Apple_HFS PBG4 2             29627888 @ 17253504 ( 14.1G)
   5:            Apple_HFS OSX                29627888 @ 46881392 ( 14.1G)
   6:            Apple_HFS Classic            17249832 @ 76509280 (  8.2G)
   7:           Apple_Free                           0+@ 93759112

Device block size=512, Number of Blocks=93759120
DeviceType=0x0, DeviceId=0x0
Now write the new partition map. Do not write the map unless you are sure you haven't accidentally deleted partition 1, or any of the Apple_HFS columes. If you make a mistake, type q instead of w and start the whole process again.
Command (? for help): w (type w and hit return)
Writing the map destroys what was there before. Is that okay [n/y]: y (type y and hit return)
The partition table has been altered

Command (? for help):q (type q and hit return)
Top Level Command (? for help):q (type q and hit return)
Your disks should automount as soon as you leave the pdisk program. OS 9 booting will no longer be possible from any volume on the affected device.
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Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting | 9 comments | Create New Account
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Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: sabi on Feb 19, '03 11:10:17AM

Be careful if you do this on a non-NewWorld machine, I am pretty sure at least one of those partitions is required to boot OS X on OldWorld PowerMacs. If you format a disk without OS 9 drivers, do any of the driver partitions remain?

Apple_Driver_IOKit - that couldn't be an OS 9 driver partition because IOKit is OS X only. So why does OS X still boot without drivers, I wonder?



[ Reply to This | # ]
Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: Eric Shepherd on Feb 19, '03 12:58:32PM

You could also simply install Mac OS 9 onto a disk image instead of a real disk, and have the disk image mount during login under OS X so that it's available for Classic. That way, it can't be directly booted into OS 9. This is a handy tactic, especially if you've already formatted and installed and don't want to have to mess with the partition table.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: Ezekiel on Feb 19, '03 04:25:41PM

Eric is completely right, why bother with changing paritions and such, when you can simply put OS 9 on a disk image an have all the benefits of classics without any of the drawbacks of having an insecure computer (from being able to boot into OS 9 that is)?



[ Reply to This | # ]
Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: klktrk on Nov 24, '03 03:18:10PM

This is a good tip, though I'm not sure how I would get a disk image to mount automatically during startup.

However, this leads to a valid reason why the route of deleting drivers might have an advantage to some: no startup/login time spent unpacking and mounting the OS 9 disk image.



[ Reply to This | # ]
This is risky!
Authored by: _merlin on Feb 19, '03 08:51:17PM

It's true, following this hint will break OS X on old-world machines. It may also break OS X on new-world machines, if you delete the IOKit driver. The IOKit driver really is for OS X only, so don't delete it, whatever you do.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: JohnnyMnemonic on Feb 20, '03 12:12:39AM
Another way is to use the Open Firmware Password, which will dis-allow booting from any external device, in Firewire Target Disk mode, from the option-boot, etc.

However, I wonder if the author is telling us how Apple broke OS 9 booting on the newest machines--and thereby is providing a method to fix it? Did Apple simply leave the OS 9 drivers off of the HDs? Did they change the partition structure? Interesting...

[ Reply to This | # ]
An interesting note...
Authored by: watson on Feb 20, '03 02:34:42PM

Just discovered that the HW diagnostics CD that came with my PB12 seems to be loosely based on OS9.
It has a System folder with Finder and a System file, but is lacking a macos rom file.
Hmmm... I wonder if it's possible to use that as a base...? :-)

Does anyone know how Apple prevents OS9 booting on the new machines? Firmware patch?

BR,
Henrik



[ Reply to This | # ]
Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: ptejad on Feb 26, '03 02:38:34PM

PS. I arrived at the list of drivers to delete by using Disk Utility to format a disk without OS 9 drivers. All that was listed was the Apple Partition Map entry and the actual HFS Partitions.

Therefore the IOKit driver is not necessary for OS X booting.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Three methods of disabling OS 9 booting
Authored by: klktrk on Nov 24, '03 03:14:53PM
Therefore the IOKit driver is not necessary for OS X booting.

On your machine.

[ Reply to This | # ]