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Enable the Graphite appearance in all system elements System
If you're like me, you've got the graphite appearance running for Aqua. Similarly, if you're like me, you get annoyed that certain parts of the system retain the regular blue Aqua look. This is because these parts of the system (like the Force Quit and Log Out dialogs) are controlled by root.

In order to change them to have the graphite appearance, simply make sure your root user is enabled. Then, log into root through the GUI (just type in "root" as the user name and your root password) and open the System Preferences once you're logged into the GUI as root. Change the GUI appearance to graphite in the General PrefPane, log out, log back in as your normal user, and you'll be set. Everything will be nice and graphite.
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Enable the Graphite appearance in all system elements | 8 comments | Create New Account
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not a problem on my system
Authored by: j-beda on Dec 09, '02 11:31:42AM

Both "force quit" and "logout" are grey rather than blue for me, and I have
never enabled nor logged in as root.

The only administrator account on this machine is set to use the grey buttons,
I wonder if that is why?



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not a problem on my system
Authored by: DavidRavenMoon on Dec 09, '02 08:14:34PM

On my system, if I set my user pref to Graphite, the Force Quit and Login are also Graphite. Probably because this is an Administrator account?



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I actually like having the two.
Authored by: skippingrock on Dec 09, '02 03:30:36PM

For me, I actually like having the two different interfaces. Aqua for one and Graphite for the other. That way I can tell whether or not an application is running as root or not. Good little security indicator for myself.



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I actually like having the two.
Authored by: eno on Dec 10, '02 03:00:20AM

Totally agreed with you there. I like it.



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Don't enable root
Authored by: seb2 on Dec 10, '02 03:28:20AM

Well, enabling root isn't really necessary for this. A simple "sudo /Applications/System\ Preferences.app/Contents/MacOS/System\ Preferences" in the Terminal does the trick, as well. (MacOSXHints doesn't seem to want my bachslashes... add a backslash between the two occurences of "System" and the following space.)

Also, you don't have to log out and back in...



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Don't enable root
Authored by: Wevah on Dec 10, '02 02:49:53PM

You can also do this (in the Terminal):

% sudo -s

Then enter your admin password. Then,

% defaults write 'Apple Global Domain' AppleAquaColorVariant 6

and then exit the root shell. Next time you log in, all root-owned widgets should be graphite-ified.



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Don't enable root
Authored by: babbage on Dec 10, '02 04:09:49PM

Better still, just do:

% sudo defaults write 'Apple Global Domain' AppleAquaColorVariant 6

That way you don't even spawn a root shell. It can't be stressed enough that enabling the root account (or even just using root shells with 'sudo -s') is almost *always* a bad idea on OSX. There is almost nothing that cannot be done adminstratively when you have access to the sudo system, and it has nice features for auditing what actions were taken with administrative priviliges. This isn't perfect & won't always protect you, but arguing that these imperfections make sudo not worth using is like arguing that acrobats shouldn't use safety nets or couples shouldn't use condoms. It's just a smart thing to do.

Be safe. Use sudo. Never turn on your root account unless you *really* know what you're up to and can't accomplish it via sudo. I have a hard time believing that there are any jobs that sudo can't do...



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Alternative method
Authored by: dieterm on Dec 10, '02 08:40:37AM

for starters, a nice tip. i was wondering what to do about those blue buttons. Another way, use 'Path Finder.app'(www.cocoatech.com) and Command >launch as root>-choose- system Preferences.app, and make said changes. a more visual way without terminal or fully enabling root.



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