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EasyDNS dynamic IP client available Internet
If you register a domain with EasyDNS, you can use dynamic IP mapping (i.e. use your cable/DSL connection with a varying IP and map it to a fixed domain). However, there is no Mac OS X client to update the IP on connect on EasyDNS's web site.

I created a client that works perfectly with OS X. You need to use the command line to set it up, but after that you are fine and will likely never see it again. It's available for download from the EasyDNS page of my website.

[Editor's note: I use DynDNS.org for my dynamic IP naming, but if you use EasyDNS, you may wish to try Novajo's client.]
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EasyDNS dynamic IP client available | 8 comments | Create New Account
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Great to know.. but what about cable routers??
Authored by: OctavianMH on May 16, '02 12:35:35PM

Nice to see this, I'd definitely pick it up, except for one little detail.

I have a linksys cable router that I'm about to install as the front end of my soon to be 2 computer network. I would love to continue to use dynDNS (which i use now), but how would that work through the router?

Has anyone gotten one of these services to work through a router? How would I go about it?

Thanks!



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Great to know.. but what about cable routers??
Authored by: russh on May 16, '02 12:45:00PM

Yes I use a Linksys Cable/DSL Router with DynDNS.

You just set the router to forward port 80 to the box that is doing your web serving. You do this via the setup screen that you access through a web browser.

So the DynDNS service is setup to the address of your router, which then automatically forwards port 80 to the machine that is serving web pages. Easy to set up, works fine.

Hope that helps.



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Great to know.. but what about cable routers??
Authored by: OctavianMH on May 16, '02 12:54:05PM

But my cable modem gets its IP via DHCP..

I don't _get_ a static IP address. So, my PC in addition must be set up via DHCP, since my cable modem could presumably be giving a new IP at any time (though it doesn't happen very often).

I'm confused about whether the dynDNS client will be smart enough to know that it's the _router's_ CURRENT IP (whatever that may be) that it needs to send to the central servers. Instead of the PC's IP (which will be something internal like 192.0.0.1 or something)

Am I making any sense here?

Thanks!



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Great to know.. but what about cable routers??
Authored by: j-beda on May 16, '02 01:19:31PM

I think that the dyndns client for os x works well - I use it on a number of
machines, including those connected by a router (macsense) - it sends the router's
address to the dyndns.org people just fine.

Maybe we should try talking to the author of that software to get him to build in support for easyDNS.ca as well?



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Great to know.. but what about cable routers??
Authored by: Novajo on May 16, '02 02:20:57PM

I am actually in Canada and have registered novajo.ca with easydns.ca (which is the same as easydns.com). No matter if you have a .ca, .com or .etc, you always update your IP at http://members.easydns.com, so the client works anywhere. As people mentionned, there are tons of dynamic dns clients (Julien Jalon's DNSUpdate at www.dnsupdate.org comes to mind and that's the one I used to use), but they don't all support Easydns as the registrar.



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Great to know.. but what about cable routers??
Authored by: russh on May 18, '02 12:03:59AM

Hope this helps:

Here's how it works...

The Cable/DSL router "becomes" your computer insofar as the cable connection is concerned. Your cable modem delivers a DHCP addy to the router. The router then assigns addresses to your computers.. whether PC, MAC, Linux.... whether wired ethernet or through Wi-Fi Airport. You can tell the router to do this either through DHCP or through static ip. (It's all setup through your web browser.)

So your PC/Mac/whatever no longer worries what the cable modem is doing.. the connection is coming from the router. The router gets it's DHCP addy from the cable modem. (This arrangement adds a nice layer of security as well.)

You get an account with dyndns.org (Or another such service) and register your current DHCP addy and your qualified domain name (e.g. "mydomain.com") with them. dyndns.org offers software that runs in OS X (or 9) that watches your DHCP addy for changes. When it changes it alert dyndns.org and the address is updated automagically.

To wrap up, let me say that this all seemed very confusing to me until I finally took the plunge and bought a Linksys Cable/DSL router. Once I did I had my entire network running in literally 10 minutes and had the whole dyndns thing worked out in a couple days. (It only took that long because it takes a while for your address your propagate through the domain name servers on the net.

It's all sounds harder and more complicated than it is in practice.



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What about cable routers and multiple domains?
Authored by: ijustin on May 17, '02 12:20:25PM

Does anyone know if, while using a Linksys DSL Router with DynDNS setup, I can host multiple [virtual] domains on one computer?



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What about cable routers and multiple domains?
Authored by: mithras on May 17, '02 08:28:04PM

You bet. They'll be name-based, not IP-based, of course.



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