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Startup and shutdown key combos System
I went looking for a quick reference containing all of the known OS X startup, shutdown, and sleep command keys. I couldn't find one, so I put this together after a little research. Most of these are the same under OS 9 and earlier.
Startup Command Keys
Close Open Windows              - Shift
Start from CD - C
Start from OS X - X (some machines)
Select Start Up Disk - Option
Reset PRAM - Cmd+Option+P+R
Start Up in Single User Mode - Cmd+S
Start Up in Verbose Mode - Cmd+V
Boot into Open Firmware - Cmd+Option+O+F
Eject CD at Startup - Hold down Mouse button
Shutdown, Restart and Sleep Keys
Deep Sleep                      - Cmd+Option+Eject
Shutdown, Restart, Sleep Dialog - Control + Eject
Shutdown, Restart, Sleep Dialog - Power key on keyboard
[Editor's note: Although many of these have been posted here before in various hints, I thought it might be worthwile to have them all in one article -- thanks to autohag for submitting the nice compilation. If there are any missing that you know of, add them as a comment and I'll revise the original article as necessary.]
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Startup and shutdown key combos | 26 comments | Create New Account
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more commands
Authored by: Garry S on Dec 06, '01 12:32:04PM

I found another one,

cmnd + control + eject = instant restart

This is the case in 10.1.1, don't know about other versions



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Bypass startup disk
Authored by: demmer12 on Dec 06, '01 12:54:52PM

I share the computer with my wife and daughter. They primarily use Mac OS 9.2.1, while I use Mac OS X 10.1.1. So that they don't have to deal with startup disk issues, I leave the startup disk set to Mac OS 9.2.1. If I want to use Mac OS X, I start or restart the machine and hold down

Command + Option + Shift + Delete

to bypass the startup disk. I hold the keys down until the flashing folder appears. My Mac is a B&W G3 400. Mac OS 9 and X are on separate hard disks. I don't know if this sequence is valuable for those who have more than two bootable drives installed.

Craig



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Easier one as far as I know...
Authored by: janpeeters on Jun 03, '03 05:51:35AM

If you press 'x' during startup it boots into OS X and leaves startupdisk as set.



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Deep Sleep
Authored by: reverie on Dec 06, '01 01:55:38PM

Pressing the large power button on the front of a G4 or B&W G3 will put it into deep sleep. That's sort of like a keyboard command. :)



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Deep Sleep
Authored by: greggomer on Dec 06, '01 03:46:53PM

what is deep sleep as opposed to sleep?

Thanks,

Greg



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Deep Sleep
Authored by: reverie on Dec 07, '01 03:42:43PM

Deep sleep is a low-power mode where the hard drive spins down, the monitor turns off, the fan turns off, and pretty much the only power consumption is going toward keeping the RAM alive. None of the programs can receive events, meaning that you can't remotely connect via the network or use an alarm program, among other things. There's supposed to be a signal that you can send remotely to get your computer to wake up, but Apple hasn't gotten this to work yet. This is the kind of sleep that you get whenever you hit the power button, use the shut down dialog, or select sleep from the apple menu.

The other kind of sleep is less deep--the hard drive spins down and monitors turn off, and other functions *may* be put to sleep, but network daemons and alarm programs will work. This is the kind of sleep you get when you check the "Wake for network administrative access" and then wait for your computer to put itself to sleep. I'm not entirely sure, but I think the machine will go into deep sleep if you don't have that box checked. The only reason this kind of fake "sleep" exists is because of the bug in network access that Apple hasn't yet resolved.



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Deep Sleep
Authored by: overstim on Dec 09, '01 08:54:26AM

Put your desktop under your desk, and THEN tell me its the same as a keyboard shortcut :)



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Another key and a comment
Authored by: grika on Dec 06, '01 02:43:27PM

Startup holding the "t" key causes computers with built-in FireWire to boot into "Target" mode which makes the computer act like a FireWire Drive (the FireWire symbol will float around the screen). Good for troubleshooting and super fast networkless data transfer.

Also, the boot drive selection screen achieved by holding down the option key on startup, is known as the "Picker".



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How does the picker work
Authored by: greggomer on Dec 06, '01 03:52:16PM

I use the Picker a lot on my G4 with multiple drives, it lets me choose which drive to boot off of. But when I use it on my Brothers Ibook which has only one partition, only one option is shown, the default in startupdisk. So how do I change that from say OS 9 to OS X?

Thanks,

Greg Montgomery



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How does the picker work
Authored by: Hes Nikke on Dec 06, '01 06:39:24PM

if your brothers iBook has Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X on the same partition, the picker will only show the 1st OS it finds.

if it is partitioned (like on my TiBook) it'll show the 1st OS it finds on any partition (Partition 1 - Mac OS 9.2.1, Partition 2 - Mac OS X, Partition 3 - Mac OS 9.2.2, used for classic)

also the Picker only works on UMA and newer macs, that means any iBook, slot loading iMac, AGP PowerMac, and >= Pismo PowerBooks.

the boot other featurs added with UMA was FireWire Target Disk mode (T), FireWire Booting, and forced Mac OS X boot (X)

so here is your solution:

if your Brothers iBook defaults to a Mac OS 9boot, just boot with the X key, to get into Mac OS X
if it boots into 9, use the Picker (as far as i know, the picker always sees 9 1st)



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Thanks
Authored by: greggomer on Dec 06, '01 08:06:03PM

Thanks for the tip, I can't tell you how much time that is going to save us in the long run.



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How does the picker work
Authored by: raynehem on Dec 07, '01 06:51:05PM

When I use the option it defaults to X and shows the 9.2.2 drive, but the arrows keys does not move. Any ideas on how to select it?



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How does the picker work
Authored by: mithras on Dec 08, '01 08:16:55AM

Use the mouse.



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How does the picker work
Authored by: raynehem on Dec 07, '01 07:04:16PM

When I use the option it defaults to X and shows the 9.2.2 drive, but the arrows keys does not move. Any ideas on how to select it?



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Another key and a comment
Authored by: Mikey-San on Dec 08, '01 12:52:14AM

Actually, the region of firmware that allows you to choose a boot device by holding option at startup has a real name. It's called the "Startup Manager".

The boot device can also be specified in Open Firmware, but one wrong step could make your machine inoperable, so it's recommended that people use the Startup Manager.


-/-
Michael Watson
Apple Product Professional
Apple Authorized Service Technician
http://www.bungie.org/



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Not all keyboard commands work everywhere
Authored by: monickels on Dec 06, '01 04:05:08PM

It's important to remember that not all of these commands work with all Macs. In reality, this chart should include another column that indicates which work where. This is particularly important when writing troubleshooting tips: you cannot assume that a user can hold down certain keys at startup and go into single-user mode, for example.



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Not all keyboard commands work everywhere
Authored by: bprior on Jan 01, '10 03:09:25PM

It's also important to remember that the wireless keyboard doesn't boot right away so keyboard boot commands like Command-V and Command-S won't work because OSX Aqua will pick up before the keyboard commands do.

Edited on Jan 01, '10 03:11:46PM by bprior



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More key modifiers
Authored by: cybergoober on Dec 06, '01 05:21:40PM

On some machines pressing "X" at startup will force-boot into 10 regardless of Startup Disk CP/SP settings. Also on some machines CNTL+OPTION+CMD+EJECT= Shutdown (does not generate a dialog, just shuts down).



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More key modifiers
Authored by: balthisar on Dec 07, '01 12:02:03AM

And of course, don't forget that a lot of Macs don't have Eject keys!



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More key modifiers
Authored by: gf on Dec 07, '01 01:26:39PM

Actually, it's "a lot of Macs don't have 'power' buttons". When Apple decided no one would ever turn off their Macs again, and removed the power button from the keyboard, they had to do something with the various keyboard combinations that used it. What they did was to replace "power" with "Eject", so (in theory) anywhere you see "power" you can press "eject", and vice versa.

Command-option-power/eject (deep sleep) doesn't seem to work on OS 10.1.

Also, add command-power/eject to enter MacsBug (OS 9 and earlier).



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More key modifiers
Authored by: reverie on Dec 07, '01 03:47:56PM

Not *quite* true. Eject is still eject. I think what you mean is that you replace power with CONTROL-eject. So:
power = control-eject = dialog
cmd-opt-power = ctrl-cmd-opt-eject = reboot (no dialog)
...and probably some others that I'm forgetting.



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What is Eject button?
Authored by: bozhe_moy on Dec 11, '01 12:30:59AM

I don't have eject button on my powerbook. What is it anyway?



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Can I always force verbose boot
Authored by: dbl0busa on Mar 15, '02 01:10:22AM

I would like my machine to *always* boot, verbosely. Is there a way to force it to do so without having to hold down the cmd+v combo? I don't know if this would require a firmware hack, or what.

-thx



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Can I always force verbose boot
Authored by: memeemeee on Jun 02, '03 11:06:46PM
one year later...
To turn on verbose boot logging all the time:
In the terminal, type
sudo nvram boot-args="-v"
If you want to reverse the change, the command is
sudo nvram boot-args="" (THATS QUOTE QUOTE)
you can find out the status of your boot args with
sudo nvram boot-args

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Startup and shutdown key combos
Authored by: memeemeee on Jun 02, '03 11:12:21PM

Is there a combo to log in as user: >console ?
I would love this. I am set to autologin, but sometimes, I dont want to have to log out and in again as >console to use DarwinBSD sans GUI.

Is there an exhaustive online list of all the startup key combos?
links would be appreciated! thanks



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Startup and shutdown key combos
Authored by: zammie on Jan 14, '04 11:51:44AM

hey there, did you ever find a key command to boot into the login screen while auto login is set?
I have not yet been able to find a way...

thanks!

Jason
zammie@mac.com



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