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Uptime stats in OS X? System
I am curious how long people have been able to keep their OS X systems up and running without a reboot for any reason. If you are not sure how to check this go to the terminal and type
uptime
It will then return something like:
6:00PM up 8 days, 15:04, 1 user, load averages: 1.24, 1.37, 1.45
The bit that says up 8 days 15 hours is what I am interested in. Reasons for rebooting would also be of use. For example I have found that over time my idle process time goes down so drastically that I must periodically reboot to improve overall system responsiveness and stability. But I also tend to get a kernel panic every 5-8 days as well. Others may find that they have to reboot into OS 9.x to use some app. 8.5 days is the longest I have been able to remain up thus far. I look forward to hearing about this...

[Editor's note: Seems like a reasonably interesting topic, given the relative lack of OS X news lately! Chime in ... my current uptime is 2 days, 23:15. Last reboot was due to a need to burn an iDVD.]
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Uptime stats in OS X? | 28 comments | Create New Account
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Uptime on iBook
Authored by: castellan on Jun 27, '01 12:02:54AM

So far, my best uptime is 30 days, 13 hours, 29 minutes (give or take). This is on a graphite 2000 iBook with 192 Megs of RAM. Only reason I had to reboot was a freeze after putting it to sleep with Classic up (not a problem I'd had before -- this was the last 'uptime' I'd checked before the incident).


I use this machine at home and at work (have an iMac w/ OS X, too, but haven't had uptimes of more than 10-11 days from new installations, etc) for programming, graphics, web design, etc.

Needless to say, for a laptop, I was pretty happy with the result!



[ Reply to This | # ]
Re: Uptime stats in OS X?
Authored by: eriks on Jul 28, '01 06:59:04AM
... my idle process time goes down so drastically that I must periodically reboot to improve overall system responsiveness and stability ...

Using OmniWeb????

I had the same problem and did reboot the whole system. I discovered than that Omniweb has a hugh memory problem. After a while the VSIZE column in the top tool (Terminal command) increses slowley from around 50 MB up to 200 MB and more. The whole system was effected. When I simply quit an restart OmniWeb everything is fine again.

All the best!

[ Reply to This | # ]
Best uptime for me...
Authored by: tanhauser on Jun 27, '01 03:13:50AM

This has been the best uptime for me, thus far:

9:10AM up 45 days, 18:56, 1 user, load averages: 0.19, 0.42, 0.46

This was simply because I went away on a research field trip for work and left my mac up. No problems whatsoever when I came back, even seti@home was working great on the terminal.

But usually, I stay up between 6-7 days tops, I either have to restart (OS Updates for example) or reboot into OS 9 for some reason (burning CDs or downloading images from my Nikon CoolPix). I've never gotten a Kernel Panic though.

This is on a:

G4/400 AGP 512MB RAM

F



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Historic uptimes using 'last'
Authored by: robh on Jun 27, '01 06:21:15AM

The command 'last' will show you some recent login stats which can be used to view recent uptimes, e.g.

[prompt] last
rob console chad Thu Jun 21 22:57 still logged in
reboot ~ Thu Jun 21 22:56
shutdown ~ Thu Jun 21 22:53
rob console chad Sat Jun 9 23:57 - 22:53 (11+22:55)
reboot ~ Sat Jun 9 23:57
rob console chad Mon Jun 4 16:54 - 23:51 (5+06:56)

The figures in ()s tell me the days+hours:minutes I was logged in.

OSX keeps this info in /var/log/wtmp, but it also keeps older data backed up in /var/log/wtmp.N.gz.

Here's a little script that can be used to read all the logs and spit out just the uptimes..

#!/bin/csh

last > /tmp/$$.total

foreach f (/var/log/wtmp.?.gz)
zcat $f > /tmp/$$
last -f /tmp/$$ >> /tmp/$$.total
end

rm /tmp/$$
grep console /tmp/$$.total | grep ' - ' | sed 's/.* - //'
rm /tmp/$$.total


Save it in a file, type "chmod +x filename" to make it executable and then type "./filename | less" to run it and pipe the output into the "less" tool that displays one page of output at a time.

Here's the output of mine:

22:53 (11+22:55)
23:51 (5+06:56)
crash (1+16:59)
crash (2+20:41)
crash (4+03:35)
crash (2+22:50)
19:39 (1+01:42)
17:47 (5+22:54)
crash (1+09:16)
09:32 (8+11:01)
00:09 (2+08:39)
15:27 (00:19)
15:08 (00:07)
15:00 (00:19)
14:40 (00:01)
14:39 (00:14)
14:21 (20:04)
18:17 (8+07:03)
crash (18:10)
16:59 (17:59)
22:55 (02:49)
10:44 (21:43)
13:00 (00:02)
12:58 (3+17:35)
18:47 (00:23)
18:24 (01:29)
14:54 (00:00)
crash (1+00:29)
14:06 (00:01)
shutdown (23:40)
13:19 (2+00:42)
12:37 (2+21:51)
14:45 (00:26)
crash (00:11)
14:07 (00:32)
13:35 (12+15:21)
crash (4+00:17)
crash (2+20:40)
shutdown (1+03:04)
shutdown (7+18:49)
crash (01:07)
crash (09:07)
14:53 (00:01)
14:49 (00:03)
shutdown (00:02)
shutdown (00:01)
14:20 (10+23:10)
crash (00:36)
shutdown (04:17)
10:04 (10:01)
crash (00:08)
23:45 (00:29)
23:15 (00:41)
shutdown (00:02)


The best I've managed is 12 days of uptime.
Notice all the crashes ?. I haven't seen one for a couple of weeks now which is promising.
I found the public beta to be more stable. I could keep that one up for weeks.



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Historic uptimes using 'last'
Authored by: Anonymous on Jun 30, '01 11:45:22PM

This looks like a great script, but for some reason it's not working on my machine (PB Wallstreet 233, 10.0.4)

I get a "foreach: No match." and the script dies.

Any help would be appreciated :)

-THX1138



[ Reply to This | # ]
Never mind...
Authored by: Anonymous on Jul 01, '01 02:50:55PM

I tried it again this morning, and it seems to work just fine. I think the problem was because I didn't have any "wtmp.0.gz" files in my /var/log directory. Perhaps my wtmp just got big enough to make a gzip backup of it this morning...

-THX



[ Reply to This | # ]
Uptime stats
Authored by: friedmaj on Jun 27, '01 10:11:29AM

"up 5 days, 8:16, 1 user, load averages: 0.80, 1.18, 0.97"

My last re-boot was for the 10.0.4 update. I've never had a kernel panic. I usually reboot for: thunderstorms or burning CDs (my Que USB CD-RW is still unsuported).



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Good, but could be better :)
Authored by: babbage on Jun 27, '01 03:30:00PM

Having just upgraded, my iMac only has 5 days, 20 hours or so right now. That's not bad, but I've
had better -- I think my record was something like three weeks before our marketing department
made me reboot so I could get screenshots of OS9. But even that could be better...

My iMac:
3:15:04pm :chris% uname -v
Darwin Kernel Version 1.3.7: Sat Jun 9 11:12:48 PDT 2001; root:xnu/xnu-124.13.obj~1/RELEASE_PPC
3:15:08pm :chris% uptime
3:21PM up 5 days, 19:51, 4 users, load averages: 1.57, 1.29, 1.23

Our webserver:
[buttercup] $ uname -rs
Linux 2.2.5-15
[buttercup] $ uptime
3:16pm up 365 days, 4:23, 2 users, load average: 0.06, 0.20, 0.12

Yes that's right -- our main webserver at work had hit one year of uptime this morning. It's my
boss' birthday; this made a nice little present for him... :)

I don't think OSX will have any trouble reaching this level of stability in time...



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not so good
Authored by: krusty76 on Jun 27, '01 06:52:32PM

my best is 13 days and 7-odd hours. there are a few reasons that this isn't exactly OS X's fault though.

1. i have rebooted everytime an update has come out.
2. i have had at least one crash after every one of those reboots, due to testing out my lame-ass QPS Fire 8x4x32x CD-RW in iTunes. (hot un-plugging the drive while iTunes is crashed, causes a kernel panic. now i know!)
3. to conserve power (i'm in CA), i have shut it down over weekends where i was going to be away.

thanks to the guy who wrote that little script. very cool. it's always fun to play with stuff like that.



[ Reply to This | # ]
Stats
Authored by: _merlin on Jun 27, '01 07:49:39PM

My typical uptime is about a week. However, this is not due to instability. I have to reboot when I install updates, and when I need to use Mac OS 9 for working on Classic applications (PowerMac Debugger doesn't work in Classic, and MPW has severe problems). I rarely bring the machine down. In 10.0, there was an incompatibility between a program I was writing and the CD-ROM driver, which caused kernel panics, and Classic could prevent a sleeping G4 Sawtooth to refuse to wake up. Both of those problems seem to have been corrected. Sometimes a program can refuse to exit, so that if you try to log out, the login window won't re-appear. My best uptime was 19 days with Mac OS X 10.0. I achieved over 40 days uptime with Public Beta (there were no updates to install).

Vasantha Crabb



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Public Beta DID stay up longer
Authored by: DeusExMachina on Jun 29, '01 02:53:07AM

And it was more than just not having so many updates.

For example, I used to amaze my linux-using friends by taking my simplistic killall script (killall is a utility to kill groups of processes by name or user which is absent from OS X for whatever reason) and kill -9 ing EVERYTHING. The result was a drop into single-user land, and a control-D later I could be back up and running with sequential PIDs. This after annihilating every running process!

I miss the stability of Public Beta, and some other things about it too: the ability to mount my DVD-RAM cartridges via mount -t hfs, for example. But more to the point, I wonder what they did to LOSE that stability... Musta been a lot of sloppy hacking late at night!

All that said, however, I'm no longer afraid with OS X to force quit things when they misbehave... it is a great step up from OS 9 in that it gives me the same uptimes, but without the thinking, patience, and conditioned responces 9 required :)

DeusExMachina
(1 day, 28 minutes since last kernel panic, as usual due to some filesystem extension or other; record: 40-some-odd days between trips into OS 9 for games back in the days of Public Beta)



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Great Application...
Authored by: WillS on Jun 27, '01 08:46:51PM

If you want to see 'Uptime' AND 'No Crash' times at best and accumulative then download a little application title "Mac Uptime PPC" - check VersionTracker.com. Great little program. I run every day or two just to see how I am doing. Since I am always rebooting back into 9 to play DVD (are you listening Apple?), this application keeps track of accumulative "No Crash" time - which is what I am truly interested in.



Just started so I only have 2 days 12 hours - and still ticking.....



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Only 2 days right now
Authored by: Anonymous on Jun 28, '01 03:10:24AM

But that's because QT won't play movies in "present" mode, and I managed to download a copy of the Phantom Edit. Had to go back to 9, and then plug the laptop into the TV for the full effect... In other words, I've got a damn good excuse. ;-) Before the last update I was somewhere around 2 weeks I think. Looking forward to the updates being farther apart so I can improve these numbers... ;-)



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Just had a crash
Authored by: sjonke on Jun 28, '01 02:11:01PM

Mail.app did something weird and effectively froze the entire OS. I couldn't even ssh into it from my iBook. It was getting some email from mac.com (IMAP) and it got stuck. The mouse became slow and stuttery and I couldn't do anything. I have had Mail do some weird things, and I have only started using it for real yesterday. Hmmm. Anyway, Mail shouldn't be able to put the computer into a state you can't recover from, so I have to put the blame on OS X, and not the Mail application. Mail is buggy, but it shouldn't be able to force a reboot. I'm running 10.0.4.

I had previously run into a problem with Eudora for X on my iBook a number of times - if I had the wrong location set (wrong network) and started Eudora, it would obviously fail to retrieve mail or access anything on the internet. Not surprising. However, once this happens NOTHING in OS X can get to anything even if I switch to the correct location. usually I could log out and back in and it would be fine (though that is certainly annoying), but last time this happened the only solution was to reboot - logging out and back in didn't help. It's as if the Location isn't really changing even though I change it in the Apple Menu (and I also tried in the system preferences.) After a reboot all was fine, but I was forced to reboot. This may only crop up when having usedan Airport base station for access - I'm pretty sure that every time this has happened I was using Airport in our lab and then went up to my office and forgot to switch to my Office location.

However, aside from troubles with these two mail programs and networking, OS X has been stable.

Steve

P.S. please make these type in fields size automatically to fit the browser window size - it is a REAL pain to type in a message on my iBook (2000 with the 800x600 display) with the current fixed width scheme.



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Browser window size...
Authored by: robg on Jun 28, '01 02:27:28PM

>>P.S. please make these type in fields size automatically to fit the browser window size<<

Hmm ... I'd love to do something like that -- but the TEXTAREA tag takes a COLS input for the number of columns, which is hard-coded. If someone wants to email me privately with suggestions (as I'm not sure how to accomplish this!), I'd love to make this a dynamic value based on browser width. It should be possible, assuming that window width is a returnable value.

-rob.



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Uptime for OS X is good when a server
Authored by: gbooker on Jun 28, '01 02:45:51PM

We have a machine at Texas A&M that doubles as the web server for the Mac User's Group and the Quicktime Streaming Server for the campus. It is currently running Public Beta:



[apple:~] % uptime

1:38PM up 138 days, 20:29, 2 users, load averages: 1.21, 1.08, 1.04



Before this, it was running OS X Server 1.2. Then it had an uptime of over 320 days when the power went out. Shortly after this, we changed it to Public Beta to use QTSS 3.0. Soon it will get Server 2.0.



OS X is fully capable of getting long uptimes, especially when running as a server.



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Countdown to Update
Authored by: Anonymous on Jun 30, '01 03:21:49AM
I can count the days between updates using the uptime command because that is the only time my machines come down. Public Beta was up the longest with 100+ days, I think 10.0.3 was up 33 days. I'd say OS X is stable. The line voltage dropped a couple of weeks ago in a sudden thunder storm and one machine (iMac DVD) came down, but that's a freak accident--beyond that, all four of my machines run the way they should. The iMac is doing server service now as punishment. Take a look at the bottom of this page: http://english.yasuda-u.ac.jp/lc/

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Countdown to Update
Authored by: Anonymous on Jun 30, '01 02:44:37PM

uptime:

1:30PM up 5 days, 20:52, 1 user, load averages: 0.35, 0.60, 0.77

Yes, the common denominator is support for hardware. I have a QUE Drive and reboot into Classic to burn CDs.

Really wish I wasn't so dependant on this. Since Apple got the CDR religion I wish my drive was supported. I would be interested to see what kind of uptime I could squeeze out of this iMac.

Not complaining. MacOSX is a dream come true. Beats the crap out of Linux (IMHO). Why, the hardware/software layer. Nuff said. Linux can't beat that. Still like Linux. Apple made the right move.


Way off topic: Nuke looks like a kick ass forum. Looks like I'm making the switch from geeklog before I get to tied to it.

Can't wait for Server to drop in the mailbox.



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Way Way Off Topic
Authored by: Anonymous on Jul 02, '01 01:22:14AM

Yes, Nuke is a good program; it's going through some development pains at the moment, but the potential is there and I know it will get better...um, sounds like a certain OS we all love! The language files for Nuke are pretty bad (most of the developers are non-native English speakers), but, again, it's not a great problem and should improve. Do check it out at http://phpnuke.org

Cheers,
ptervin



[ Reply to This | # ]
Way Way Off Topic
Authored by: Anonymous on Jul 02, '01 01:26:32AM

Yes, Nuke is a good program; it's going through some development pains at the moment, but the potential is there and I know it will get better...um, sounds like a certain OS we all love! The language files for Nuke are pretty bad (most of the developers are non-native English speakers), but, again, it's not a great problem and should improve. Do check it out at http://phpnuke.org

Cheers,
ptervin



[ Reply to This | # ]
Way Way Off Topic
Authored by: Anonymous on Jul 03, '01 11:44:15AM

Yes, I got it. Very cool. Had it running in minutes.



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Smooth sailing over here
Authored by: Anonymous on Jul 01, '01 02:21:52PM

My best uptime is the 30 day range. I did have to reboot for 10.0.4. I've never had a kernel panic but I have 3 other machines on my desk so X isn't working very hard. I love it.

g4/400 pci 512mb ram



[ Reply to This | # ]
9 days currently
Authored by: Anonymous on Jul 01, '01 03:00:44PM

I'm at 9 days of uptime, which is the most so far for me:

11:55AM up 9 days, 18:49, 2 users, load averages: 0.20, 0.03, 0.02

I'm runnning on a PowerBook G3 Wallstreet 233mhz/160MB/2GB (no cache model) on 10.0.4. It's pretty much a server, so it's running in >console mode the whole time. As you can see load averages are very low, I am only running minor stuff (apache, mud clients, and compiling for my programming classes). The only crashes I ever get are from logging out of the GUI, which seems to have stopped in 10.0.4.

-THX



[ Reply to This | # ]
Reasons for rebooting in 9
Authored by: ktappe on Jul 03, '01 04:11:36PM

1. To burn a CD
2. To use VirtualPC

If Apple could fix #1 and Connectix could fix #2, I'd stay in X 100% of the time.

-Kurt



[ Reply to This | # ]
Reasons for rebooting in 9
Authored by: scope on Jul 29, '01 01:48:30PM

Apple and Roxio both took care of #1 in thier own ways, and Connectix has fixed #2 with the Virtual PC Test Drive



[ Reply to This | # ]
Sluggish System
Authored by: Crusty on Jul 06, '01 02:36:58PM

I recently installed 10.0.4 on my PB 400 Pismo and my parents' iMac 350 on Monday, and have been pleased with it so far. My longest uptime has been just over a day, the reason being I had to reboot after waking the system from sleep. It seemed sluggish and unresponsive after letting it sleep overnight. Ever since then, I always shutdown at night.

Has anyone figured out why the system does this, or have any fixes for it?



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Idle process time goes down: Using OmniWeb?
Authored by: eriks on Jul 28, '01 07:03:35AM
... my idle process time goes down so drastically that I must periodically reboot to improve overall system responsiveness and stability ...

Using OmniWeb????

I had the same problem and did reboot the whole system. I discovered than that Omniweb has a hugh memory problem. After a while the VSIZE column in the top tool (Terminal command) increses slowley from around 50 MB up to 200 MB and more. The whole system was effected. When I simply quit an restart OmniWeb everything is fine again.

All the best!


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Uptime stats in OS X? Go to TuxTime
Authored by: hamarkus on Jun 18, '03 12:23:13PM

Everybody who is interested in this topic should have a look at:
http://www.tuxtime.dk/
They log uptimes from all types of computers.



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