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What to do about a deleted root account System
I installed the final release of OS X today. I set up my account just as I did with the public beta, except when I am in terminal at the command line, and I try to become superuser, it doesn't let me. It says "sorry" and that is the end of it.

I tried changing the root password in the NetInfo Manager app, but that was unsuccessful. So I deleted the root account! Now I can't do anything with netinfo manager and I can't "su" at the command line, as it says, "su: unknown login root."

What can I do without wiping out my disk and starting from scratch? Is there a way to create a new root user?

Any help would be appreciated.
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root
Authored by: robh on Mar 25, '01 09:11:32AM

Oh dear, sound like you've made a mess of it.

You could try booting into single user mode. I think you hold down the 's' key at boot-time.

However, if you've done too much damage that might not buy you much and you'd be better off biting the bullet and starting from scratch again.

Do a search on this site for tips on how to correctly enable root on OS X via netinfomanager.

Good luck.



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can't login as root...
Authored by: Anonymous on Mar 25, '01 11:25:16AM

i've got a similar problem that might be related. on a fresh install of X, on a separate hard drive that was erased by the installer, i can do everything *but* login as an administrator to make system preference changes. some preferences, like Startup Disk, don't even let me try to login as an admin - the button is grey. for others, like Network, when i login, it never completes autentication. if i enter a bad password, it says it's bad. if i enter the right password, it just gets stuck authenticating.

any ideas?



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root user
Authored by: Anonymous on Mar 26, '01 12:41:24AM

If you boot from the install disk, you can choose "reset password" and it will give you a list of users, including the "root user". This should solve your problem.



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Root Password
Authored by: Anonymous on Mar 26, '01 03:18:11AM

The root account has to be activated before you can use it. Run Netinfo Manager from the Utilities menu. Choose Domain->Security->Authenticate from the drop-down menu. Then choose Enable Root User from the same menu.



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Heh, I'm a moron
Authored by: Anonymous on Mar 26, '01 03:27:34AM

I totally misread the original post. Do the CD thing :)



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me too
Authored by: clong@mac.com on Mar 29, '01 02:28:39PM

I've done the same thing. The CD thing doesn't work because "root" doesn't show up as a user. I'm looking into the single-user option, but I haven't found concrete instructions on what to do when I get there.



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success!!!
Authored by: clong@mac.com on Mar 29, '01 05:22:23PM

Well, I got my root user back by setting up another OS X machine the same way I configured mine, then exporting the NetInfoManager info. to a ZIP and importing it on the original (previously messed up) machine. I guess if anyone else has this problem, I could set them up as a user on this extra machine, then export and email them the resulting file (you would of course want to delete me as a user so I couldn't hack into your system) LOL.

Chris



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Superuser access
Authored by: Anonymous on Mar 31, '01 02:59:58AM

Pull up your terminal window, and use the "sudo" command. ie: sudo passwd xxx
where "xxx" is your desired password. you can then use that password to step into superuser mode.
you can also use the sudo to run apps / commands from your normal user login that can normally only be run from root.



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